Start your 30-day free trial

Quantity:1
The Class (Single-disc ed... has been added to your Basket
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Sold by madbrad93
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Will be sent within one working day of you placing your order - will be sent in a padded envelope to protect your product. Has been watched and is in a good condition. Plays perfectly. Ex rental
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£4.99
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.00. Details
Sold by: The World Cinema Store
Add to Basket
£5.99
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.00. Details
Sold by: A2Z Entertains
Add to Basket
£7.95
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.00. Details
Sold by: FILMNIGHT
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • The Class (Single-disc edition) [DVD] [2008]
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

The Class (Single-disc edition) [DVD] [2008]


Price: £4.50 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
26 new from £3.23 10 used from £3.00 1 collectible from £10.28

LOVEFiLM By Post

Rent The Class on DVD from LOVEFiLM By Post
£4.50 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Enjoy £1 credit to spend on movies or TV on Amazon Instant Video when you purchase a DVD or Blu-ray offered by Amazon.co.uk. A maximum of 1 credit per customer applies. UK customers only. Offer ends at 23:59 BST on Tues, June 30, 2015. Here's how (terms and conditions apply)
  • Check out big titles at small prices with our Chart Offers in DVD & Blu-ray. Find more great prices at our DVD and Blu-ray Bargains Store.

Frequently Bought Together

The Class (Single-disc edition) [DVD] [2008] + Etre Et Avoir [DVD] [2002] + Petit Nicolas [DVD]
Price For All Three: £17.75

Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product details

  • Actors: Juliette Demaille, Nassim Amrabt, Francois Begaudeau, Cherif Bounaidja Rachedi, Arthur Fogel
  • Directors: Laurent Cantet
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: French
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Artificial Eye
  • DVD Release Date: 22 Mar. 2010
  • Run Time: 130 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0034KX5MS
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 9,454 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

The greatest lessons are learnt when life enters the classroom. The tense environment of a tough inner-city school where cultures and attitudes often clash is revealed in this award-winning drama based on François Bégaudeau s best-selling novel Between the Walls. Bégaudeau himself stars as an idealistic teacher of a class of unruly 15 year-olds, whose spiky independence present a constant challenge to his sometimes unconventional teaching methods. Featuring an outstanding non-professional cast of real teachers and students, Laurent Cantet s gripping and sharply observed film offers a microcosm of contemporary society and explores the issues and challenges of education today. SPECIAL FEATURES Interviews with director Laurent Cantet Theatrical trailer

From Amazon.co.uk

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By C. MacLellan VINE VOICE on 14 Aug. 2009
Format: DVD
The Plot
Working in a tough Parisian suburb, teacher François Marin (François Bégaudeau) thinks that he can turn around the fortunes of his unruly class. That is until his class turn on him.

The Review
The winner of the Palme d'Or at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival should definitely come with a health warning prior to viewing. It should warn all potential teachers to avoid watching the film, as once they watch it, they're likely to be put off teaching for life. They should then be provided with an emergency copy of School of Rock and a tub of Ben and Jerry's.

The Class's original French title, Entre les murs, or Between The Walls, is probably a better title for the film, as the classroom at its centre serves as a cauldron of clashes, not only between the teacher and his 24 students, but between the students themselves. During the school year, there are many ups and downs, with the cauldron continuing to bubble and boil over at certain points. What makes the film all the more brilliant is that this could be any class, in any school.

François Bégaudeau has the real life experience, having written a book on his time in the classroom and this comes across in his performance in the lead role. He is an idealist, constantly pushing the boulder up the hill, simply for it to continue slipping back down. The use of real students, teachers and parents also adds to the authenticity of the film.

The Verdict
A lesson in conflict and communication, The Class has much to teach us about education and attitudes towards it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By 3inarow on 23 Dec. 2009
Format: DVD
A very good film to watch. Unlike other reviewers, I didn't find this at all ponderous or too talky. Instead, it was thought provoking and scarily accurate. Although a primary teacher, there were still many scenes which struck a chord e.g. the pupils' apparent disinclination to learn, the awkwardness of parents' evening and the powerlessness of teachers to understand the viewpoint of their students. Particularly scary is one of the final scenes when a pupil confesses that she has understood nothing and the teacher can only utter useless platitudes.

The film offers no solutions to the underlying conflict between teachers and pupils. There is no Hollywood-type ending and the film is all the better for it.

I had a few problems with the translated subtitles and would have appreciated subtitles in French to understand some of the slang the children used.

Highly recommended.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By William Cohen VINE VOICE on 4 Dec. 2010
Format: DVD
I didn't know whether this film was a documentary or a drama, it turns out that it's the latter, but its appeal is that it feels like reality and evokes the dilemmas and problems experienced by teachers in a secondary school.

It's long, but I stuck with it and it's very satisfying. I don't know how they managed to act it so beautifully, the teacher, Mr Marin, is superb. You really get into his shoes and feel his idealism and his frustration. You see when he makes a mistake by calling two pupils- petasses - and you can see the trouble that's coming. I also enjoyed the perspective on teaching children from many different cultures. Also, it's a great way to refresh your French as there is loads of dialogue which is clear and engaging.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By jrhartley on 17 July 2009
Format: DVD
I had been looking forward to seeing this film since first hearing about its achievements at Cannes in 2008. The story is loosely based on the book "Entre Les Murs" - between the walls, François Marin is a teacher in a school for special needs / wayward and disadvantaged children, many of them from France's overseas territories or former colonies.

The first hour or so the film develops well, introducing the main protagonists and the inevitable tensions between them all starting to build - François's frustrations at their inattention to his teachings, the student's frustrations at his inability to empathise and defend them against bad behaviour charges, the frictions of a new boy from the West Indies arriving and clashing with the existing top student dog from Mali, the risk of the class itself turning the tables on the teacher and seeing him expelled from the school.... you have the feeling that the film is building to a crescendo.

I don't want to spoil the movie for others by revealing the end, but all I will say is that, as is so typically the case with some modern 'art house' French cinema, there seems to be a huge reticence to leave anything on the cutting room floor. The scene where the teachers were voting on the future of Souleymane is verging on OTT as the camera follows the transparent ballot box around the teachers and they drop in their folded voting slips. I expect the director may believe there is huge visual metaphor in that - the 'supposed transparency yet closedness' of the school disciplinary process, but I found it laboured and pretentious. And disappointingly, after about 75 minutes in, this is how the films goes, overly ponderous and lingering.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
26 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Elias M VINE VOICE on 15 May 2009
Format: DVD
The Class, set in a tough, ethnically diverse comprehensive school on the edge of Paris, follows a group of students and their teacher, whose interactions with one another are sometimes amicable and, at other times, combative. The Class is neither a documentary nor is it, strictly speaking, a docudrama. It is a drama which blurs the line between fiction and reality. Cantet achieved the film's true-to-life feel by using real kids and their teachers from Francoise Dolto Junior High in Paris's 20th arrondissement instead of actors - in much the same tradition as Gillo Pontecorvo's masterpiece, The Battle of Algiers; Ken Loach's Poor Cow and Kes; and more recently Saul Dibb's Bullet Boy. These directors were successful in "engineering" an understated simplicity in their works, as well as creating a heightened sense of realism, achieved by using non-actors to play the main roles, and diverging from a written script. In an interview Cantet revealed no dialogue was written, although a framework story for the students was provided. He also held weekly improv sessions for eight months with the actors, including Francois Begaudeau (who plays the teacher, and also authored the novel and co-authored the screenplay). This process created a sense of spontaneity in each of the scenes. The Class was made with the relatively low budget of 2.3 million euros: It was shot using three high definition cameras (one pointed at the teacher, another on the student at the centre of the scene, and a third camera poised to capture moments of digression).
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
Can the subtitles be turned off? 0 7 Oct 2012
subtitles 1 23 Dec 2009
See all 2 discussions...  
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback