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The City of London, Volume IV: A Club No More 1945-2000: Club No More, 1945-2000 Vol 4 Hardcover – 17 May 2001


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 886 pages
  • Publisher: Chatto & Windus (17 May 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0701169494
  • ISBN-13: 978-0701169497
  • Product Dimensions: 23.6 x 15.4 x 5.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 550,576 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

David Kynaston was born in Aldershot in 1951. He has been a professional historian since 1973 and has written eighteen books, including The City of London (1994-2001), a widely acclaimed four-volume history, and W.G.'s Birthday Party, an account of the Gentleman vs. the Players at Lord's in July 1898. He is the author of Austerity Britain, 1945-51, the first title in a series of books covering the history of post-war Britain (1945-1979) under the collective title 'Tales of a New Jerusalem'. He is currently a visiting professor at Kingston University.

(Photo credit: Michael Burns)

Product Description

Amazon Review

The City of London. Vol IV: A Club No More is the fourth and final volume of David Kynaston's epic history of the square mile in the modern era. This lively and informative book takes the story from the post-war era, when the City was hemmed in by bombsites and austere Chancellors, through to very recent developments, such as the "Big-Bang" deregulation of 1986. This is as much a social history as a financial study, with interesting discussions of the changing class (it altered only gradually) and sexual (change was almost negligible) complexion of the City, and with fascinating details on the early computerisation of the big companies. As with earlier volumes Kynaston's style is that of an anecdotal storyteller. Colourful characters, dramatic boardroom struggles and heated exchanges between politicians and bankers dominate the pages. And memorable quotes too; the comparison of the Stock Exchange to an acqueduct for example: as one financier observed, "it argues no fault in the construction of the acqueduct that the water it conveys is often dirty". On this point Kynaston is, not surprisingly, neutral. As evidence of share-dealing, pensions and derivatives scandals mount up in the later chapters, and rogues like Robert Maxwell and Nick Leeson join the cast of thousands, the author proves reluctant to wag his finger at the accused. Only the City, it seems, and never any individual within it, was to blame. --Miles Taylor

Review

"Economic history at its most glittering." -"The Times "A rare kind of writer." -"TLS

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Chose this book as I worked in the city of London from 1960 until 1995. Found it most interesting as a lot the people mentioned I knew or knew of. Would recommend, to people who also worked in the city
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Dear All

It was excellent to receive this -many thanks.

Best wishes and many thanks to you all.

Frank Shields
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7 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 3 July 2001
Format: Hardcover
With the disappearance of village life have gone many of the City's most colourful figures, vividly depicted by Mr Kynaston. The working day has grown, and the screen has replaced the trading floor.
The incoming US banks have supplied a few figures of their own.The atmosphere of the village, where everybody knew everybody else allowed financial regulation to be an informal matter of Etonian codes of honour. The move to formal regulation was driven by a series of home-grown City scandals, from the debacle at Lloyd's to the destruction of the ancient house of Barings by Nick Leeson's speculations.
Fantastic, fascinating and forceful.
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5 of 19 people found the following review helpful By William Podmore on 29 April 2009
Format: Paperback
In this book, financial journalist David Kynaston tells in loving detail the story of the City of London since 1945.

He reminds us of all those City scandals, like Guinness, Blue Arrow, BCCI, Robert Maxwell (backed to the end by Goldman Sachs) and Barings, its endemic crime of insider dealing, and its self-serving incompetence, as when insurance firms wrongly advised more than two million people to leave their occupational pension schemes.

The City claims to help the economy by directing investment into production and growth, but it has not done this. Instead it takes money out of the economy, away from production. It seizes the wealth created by real work, and loots from the constant stream of capital hurtling round the globe - other people's money, our savings, mortgages and pensions - and gambles it away. The interests of what Kynaston calls `infinitely amoral international capital' conflict with Britain's real interests, particularly our industry.

He shows how the City has always backed the most backward forces and policies. He recounts how in the 1975 referendum on EEC membership, "The City, so far as one can tell, was almost unanimously in favour of a `Yes' vote. Two months ahead of voting the clearing banks agreed to contribute £200,000 to the `Britain in Europe' campaign."

He notes, on "the larger question of whether City sentiment as a whole was supportive of Thatcherite economics during these early, highly controversial years of the Thatcher era. Broadly, as far as one can tell, it was ..." And not just in the early years: in the June 1987 election, City traders wore stickers saying, "We all say YES to Maggie."

Successive governments - none more than Brown's - have embraced the treachery in the City. Instead, we need to put Britain, and Britain's industry, first, and make finance serve our national interest of employing all our people in useful work, making what we need.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
2 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Over-enthusiastic study of the City of London 29 April 2009
By William Podmore - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
In this book, financial journalist David Kynaston tells in loving detail the story of the City of London since 1945.

He reminds us of all those City scandals, like Guinness, Blue Arrow, BCCI, Robert Maxwell (backed to the end by Goldman Sachs) and Barings, its endemic crime of insider dealing, and its self-serving incompetence, as when insurance firms wrongly advised more than two million people to leave their occupational pension schemes.

The City claims to help the economy by directing investment into production and growth, but it has not done this. Instead it takes money out of the economy, away from production. It seizes the wealth created by real work, and loots from the constant stream of capital hurtling round the globe - other people's money, our savings, mortgages and pensions - and gambles it away. The interests of what Kynaston calls `infinitely amoral international capital' conflict with Britain's real interests, particularly our industry.

He shows how the City has always backed the most backward forces and policies. He recounts how in the 1975 referendum on EEC membership, "The City, so far as one can tell, was almost unanimously in favour of a `Yes' vote. Two months ahead of voting the clearing banks agreed to contribute £200,000 to the `Britain in Europe' campaign."

He notes, on "the larger question of whether City sentiment as a whole was supportive of Thatcherite economics during these early, highly controversial years of the Thatcher era. Broadly, as far as one can tell, it was ..." And not just in the early years: in the June 1987 election, City traders wore stickers saying, "We all say YES to Maggie."

Successive governments - none more than Brown's - have embraced the treachery in the City. Instead, we need to put Britain, and Britain's industry, first, and make finance serve our national interest of employing all our people in useful work, making what we need.
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