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The Chase Hardcover – 1 Nov 2007

4.3 out of 5 stars 133 customer reviews

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Hardcover, 1 Nov 2007
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Michael Joseph Ltd (1 Nov. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0718152794
  • ISBN-13: 978-0718152796
  • Product Dimensions: 16.1 x 3.7 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (133 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 774,537 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Clive Cussler is the author of many "New York Times" bestsellers, most recently "The Spy" and "Lost Empire." He lives in Arizona.


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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
This was my first experience of Cussler's writing, so I can't compare it with his other work. Someone already used an analogy with the Hardy Boys style and, whilst that's perhaps a little harsh, it's not too far wide of the mark. In the opening pages we learn about how the sunken locomotive was found via clumsy text along the lines of "it was lucky that fisherman lost his outboard motor overboard and decided to try to fish for it" - I don't have the book to hand for the exact quotation, but on various occasions throughout it I half expected a Scooby-Doo style speech along the lines of "those durned kids" or "those durned Van Dorn agents". Some of the scenarios in which the agents second-guess the movements of Cromwell were highly improbable and tended again towards the Hardy Boys school of writing. I found the agents' characters very shallow and 100 pages into the book was in two minds whether to carry on with it or not, but finally I was glad that I did. The later section that included the chase with the Locomobile versus the train was worth waiting for, and the detail of driving early cars (manually retarding the ignition ignition to start, pumping the petrol by hand, etc.) was quite a reminder of how far we've come in motoring. The earthquake/fire were an interesting extension to the plot, though I noticed that when Marion first realises that the piano has fallen into the street she says it's her grandmother's, but it's then referred to as her mother's - printer's typo, I guess. All in all a good read, but to draw one more parallel, it's not so much like "Silent Witness" and more along the lines of "The Sweeney".
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Format: Hardcover
Clive Cussler certainly deserves his title "The Grandmaster of Adventure". Since "Raise the Titanic", he has blended historical fact with fiction of a truly exciting nature. Normally this is focussed in a maritime environment, but "The Chase", unusually, is primarily land-based. Cussler's love of all things mechanical now includes railway engines, but I'm still not convinced that an 'Atlantic' (4-4-2) could outpace an equivalent 'Pacific' (4-6-2)! (cf.'Mallard'). However, this does nothing to detract from the joy of reading this novel; his new hero, Isaac Bell is every bit as interesting as Dirk Pitt, Kurt Austin or Juan Cabrillo and the crew of the 'Oregon', and also continues the romantic twists. The historical significance of San Francisco on April 18th,1906 adds to the suspense!
I am one of those irritating readers who examine the end of a novel to see what happens; but I had to read every page carefully to fully enjoy this experience. And it IS good to enjoy Cussler on his own; not to decry the assistance of Craig Dirgo or Paul Kemprecos with some of his other novels. I suppose you'll eventually retire, Clive: don't do it yet, because there many readers around the world who love your unique style of fiction blended with fact, and enjoy the care and attention that you show in your writing. Thank you for thirty-one great reads, Clive!
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By Clashcity Rocker TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 6 Sept. 2009
Format: Paperback
Big fan of the Dirk Pitt and Oregon Files novels, this one fits into neither series, it's a standalone novel from Cussler, and very good it is too. Set in the early 20th century, a bank robber is robbing banks in western mining towns and murdering all witnesses.

If you love Cussler's regular story series, you will love this standalone novel too.
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Format: Hardcover
I was worried when I didn't see Dirk Pitt's name anywhere, but i need not have been. Clive Cussler has taken an already popular genre "detective/adventure" and has produced a masterpiece. It may be different to his usual books but it should not be sniffed at. I just hope there is more from this new Bell character aswell as more Pitt and Austin!
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Format: Hardcover
A change from Clive Cussler's normal undersea adventure writing, but a thoroughly enjoyable read. I found it hard to put this book down. Definitely recommend this title to all who enjoy a good 'detective/adventure/thriller' novel. Look forward to more of Cussler's stories like this in the future.
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Format: Hardcover
I am someone who buys Clives books the moment they come out. This one is a very different style to his previous ones and once I got over the disappointment of this I actually enjoyed the book more and more as I got into it. He has proved his versatility as a writer.
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Format: Hardcover
After the Clive Cusslers Last offering in The Navigator, I was worried he had lost his touch. When Chase arrived I was even more worried when I saw there was no Kurt Austin or Dirk Pitt. I need not have been concerned. Cussler is back on form with this ripping yarn, a great read. Cussler fans will not be disappointed!
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Format: Paperback
Are you looking for novel full of complex storylines and believable characters? If so, then don’t read any of Cussler's work. If you are looking for a book to enjoy for what it is: an escapist adventure, then you could do worse then read The Chase.

The Chase was my first Clive Cussler novel. I wanted to read a straightforward tale where a larger than life action hero (in this case Isaac Bell), takes on and triumphs against insurmountable challenges. Along the way he solves a mystery, thwarts a pantomime style evil villain, gets involved with various vehicular chases and gets the girl.

Of course, the formulaic plot is bordering on the insane, so much so that its hardly even worth describing. Suffice to say it’s a familiar, fast paced action packed book. In fact, Cussler is at his best when he describes out and out action.

But be aware that his language is flowery to say the least. He could have some done with a ruthless editor to slash out the massive amount of redundancy in every single sentence. It’s this verbiage which makes Cussler an acquired taste. The authors of some of the best thrillers I’ve read, write in a lean and frugal manner. This adds pace and tension. Cussler is at the opposite end of the scale. He subscribes to the idea of why use one word when twenty will do? Why not add as much of my research to every single paragraph as I possibly can?

I’m guessing that in less capable hands this style of writing would quickly become gibberish. So it’s a testament to Cussler that he can pull together all the far-fetched story strands in a readable way. And the result is so enjoyable that you're happy to overlook the many holes in the story.

I did like the way Cussler opens the book, set in the 1950s.
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