Changing Places and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£2.64
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Delivery, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Changing Places: A Tale of Two Campuses Paperback – 25 Feb 1993


See all 14 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 25 Feb 1993
£0.01
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.


Product details

  • Paperback: 250 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books Australia; 2nd edition edition (25 Feb 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140170987
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140170986
  • Product Dimensions: 13.7 x 1.5 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,957,511 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

David Lodge's novels include Deaf Sentence, Changing Places, Small World, Nice Work, Therapy, Thinks... and Author, Author. He has also written stage plays and screenplays, and several books of literary criticism, including The Art of Fiction, Consciousness and the Novel and, most recently, The Year of Henry James. Formerly Professor of English at Birmingham University, David now writes full-time. He continues to live in Birmingham.

Product Description

Review

"A magnificent comic novel" (Guardian)

"Three-star rating for a laugh a line" (Evening Standard)

"Not since Lucky Jim has such a funny book about academic life come my way" (Sunday Times) --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Book Description

The first of the hilarious novels in the campus trilogy, Changing Places is a funny and wise tale of academic ill-manners - David Lodge at his comic best. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mighty Mouse on 6 Dec 2009
Format: Paperback
I've not read any David Lodge before and picked this up on holiday. Within a few pages I was hooked and pulled into a tight and funny story. I'm particularly interested in UK/US differences anyway, so this played towards my inclinations and interests. And there were some very funny moments.

Clearly this novel is a little dated now (not just from the late sixties setting, but also from the mid seventies writing?) and some of these differences in culture are not as stark as they once were. Also, I found the ending a little disappointing. But overall, I enjoyed the back and forth between Zapp and Swallow and watching their transformations through Lodge's set pieces on a plane, in letters, in prose and in drama.

Many people seem to think this is his best, but I think I will try some more Lodge some time.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By "marklee35" on 12 Jun 2001
Format: Hardcover
The story takes place in 1969 as two professors, American Morris Zapp and Englishman Philip Swallow swap places at each other's universities. Swallow goes to Zapp's Euphoric State University (California, probably Berkeley) and Zapp goes to Swallow's University of Rummidge in England's Midlands, (probably Birmingham). In Changing Places David Lodge is an academic writing about academics.
In the background students are revolting, feminism is beginning, US consumerism is rampaging and the prominent English welfare state is becoming more and more worn out. In the foreground the comparison of the two worlds of academe, English and American, becomes a microcosm for the two nations as a whole. The novel explores how the two professors (and their respective wives), become reciprocally aware of how much their life-style and their set of values, inside and outside the Academe, owe to what they progressively recognize as one's own and the other's national identity and character. Literary criticism too is a distinct feature of national identity: Zapp is a champion of specialization, while Swallow despises theory as something un-English.
Swallow sees the Americans as being better off but not having a better life than the English. They are more cynical and he is uncomfortable with the way they place the pursuit of their own ends above nearly everything. Zapp sees England as gloomy, poor, shabby and boring, linked to welfare solidarity and unaware of the power of free enterprise, but he is impressed by family bonds, the warmth of human relationships and the survival of moral scruples.
Neither side wins and no sterotypes are allowed since the narrator invites the reader to sit beside him and at his detached height judge by his own common sense.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kiwifunlad on 24 Oct 2010
Format: Paperback
This book is not without its failings but like Boyle's "The Tortilla Curtain" I gave it five stars for its excellent entertainment value coupled with wonderful writing.
Published in 1975 and set in 1969 this book bubbles with picturesque observations and a penetratingly accurate portrayal of the differences between English Academia versus American Academia. Policeman Plod versus Sherriff Shlick.
The book revolves around the exchange posting between two lecturers, one an American from California, Morris Zapp, and the other from the Midlands England, Philip Sparrow. David Lodge weaves a wonderful tapestry around the six months each lecturer spends in the other's campus. Albeit at times slightly over political with regard to the student unrest in the late 60's which is less of interest to today's reader, this novel is an excellent depiction of its period.
Lodge's sharp wit comes to life very early and I especially enjoyed Zapp's surprise on learning that he was the only man of the 156 passengers aboard the charter flight to Heathrow. If you cannot guess why, read this wonderful novel and find out.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By ncm0@aber.ac.uk on 8 May 2001
Format: Paperback
Changing Places was Lodge's first campus novel and arguably the best. When the Californian Morris Zapp the English Philip Swallow swap jobs for a semester thay swap everything about each other's lives, which obviously has hilarious consequences, but their very diifferent takes on the situation provide a thoughtful aspect to the book. This is not only about a situation but also about an era and is based on Lodge's real life experiences on an academic exchange. This lends an interesting edge to the book, however this is such a work of genius, you forget the critical aspect and just smile your way through. I would recommend this book, but beware of the academic aspect. If it is new to you this book will either be a confusion or a delightful insight!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Christine Adams on 3 Jun 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed this. Living in Birmingham and having been here during the student sit ins this was a trip down memory lane in parts. It is well written using lots of different writing techniques to continue the story. I particularly liked the two airplanes travelling in opposite directions across the Atlantic with an account of what is happening in real time on each plane.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bacchus TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 7 May 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Changing Places has been selected for my reading group and I have had so much fun reading through it.

For me, the book has a nice glow of nostalgia. I was myself a student at the University of Birmingham, the model for Rummidge and it is clear from the descriptions of buildings etc that Rummidge is no other place. Changing Places was written in 1975 and describes events in 1969.

The story concerns two academics, one from Rummidge, a mild mannered and rather buttoned up English academic called Philip Swallow and an American from the Euphoria State University of Esseph (which I suppose is San Francisco) called Morris Zapp, who is brash and opinionated. They engage in a 6 month exchange. While neither relishes the change of job, they both have reasons for escape.

The story turns into quite a journey for both, with plenty of bed hopping and cultural misunderstandings. There are plenty of different literary devices used from straight narrative, to the epistolary novel, to news articles (which are occasionally quite absurd) to a kind of Noel Coward drawing room comedy. David Lodge's literary background shows as bits of Shakespeare, WB Yeats and Jane Austen are slyly pushed into the dialogue - its great fun.

There are also moments of farce. One thing I had almost completely forgotten about from my time at Birmingham was using the paternoster lift in the library, a terrifying continually moving elevator which passengers just step on. The description of the chase involving a mad former professor was one of the highlights of the book for me.

Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback