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The Changes: A Trilogy Paperback – Dec 1991


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Product details

  • Paperback: 428 pages
  • Publisher: Dell Publishing Company (Dec 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0440504139
  • ISBN-13: 978-0440504139
  • Product Dimensions: 22 x 15.8 x 2.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 244,409 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Peter Dickinson was born in 1927 in Livingstone, Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia) the second son of British colonial civil servant and a South African farmer's daughter. The family returned to England in 1935, but his father died suddenly in the same year. He was educated at Eton College and was researching for a PhD in King's College, Cambridge,when in 1952 he was offered a offered a job on the editorial staff of Punch magazine, where he stayed until l969.

In 1968 he published his first two books, a crime novel, Skin Deep (aka The Glass-sided Ants' Nest) and a children's adventure story, The Weathermonger. Since then he has published about 50 books in both genres , and has been translated into many languages. He has won a number of prizes and awards (see Bibliographies for details.)

He has been chairman of the Society of Authors and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature. He was awarded and OBE for services to literature in 2009.

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31 of 31 people found the following review helpful By A. Craig HALL OF FAME on 25 April 2005
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One of my favourite books as a child was the third in this trilogy, The Weathermongers, about a brother and sister who are half-drowned because the boy is a "weathermonger" - someone who can change the weather just by willing it. The England they live in has been overcome by a kind of mass hysteria, or hatred of machines, forcing its people back into a medieval way of life. The pair escape to France, where the French are mystified by this new England, and the sudden change in their own weather. The children get sent back and discover the madness and magic are due to the reawakening of Merlin...I've admired many subsequent Dickinson novels, but none has haunted me quite like this one, and now I find there are two other books, The Devil's Children and Heartsease, which precede it. The first tells of the coming of the madness, and of a moving journey made by Nicky, abandoned by her parents and picked up by a family of Sikhs. They use her as their "canary", to warn them of when they're about to do something dangerous, and eventually settle near a village where they are regarded as fairy folk or devil's children, painfuly relearning the craft of smithing. Of course, Dickinson isn't jst telling a story but a parable about how different cultures and races need each other, and about trust - the theme of the next novel. These are wonderful stories, making the familiar strange, and like John Christopher's Tripods Trilogy would be perfect to read and discuss in a class - if the National Curriculum allowed for more imagination.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Mr. B. T. Ellis on 9 Sep 2009
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If you where alive in the early seventies, and you watched the dramas aimed at 12-13yr olds then I suggest you buy this. The quality of the story binds well with the feeling of being 12-16yrs old during the height of the Cold War. The feeling that you were not in control of your own destiny and that fate was the only thing that decided your destiny. This rinds well with the teenage power that 'The Children will provide their own destiny', whilst the adults got busy with the destruction of society, the Children would get on with it, with a little help from Children that were really adults (Young adults felt like Children).

If you are a child of the Cold War buy this and remember the feeling that at any time, that the clock for armageddon was ticking.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Hunnymonsta on 10 May 2014
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I watched the series as a child in the 1970s. Sadly there seems to be no watchable media version of this frightening story today though. Shame. It would be worth revisiting, if only for nostalgia's sake.
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By David Everett on 2 May 2014
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I read this book as a child and really enjoyed it. It was good to be able to read it again and still enjoy it.
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Excellent book. Written 1969/1971 or so. Still relevant now.

In the Children's selection. But enjoyed by adults equally (as so many books are, if we are honest)
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