Cargo Liners: An Illustrated History and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more

Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading Cargo Liners: An Illustrated History on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

The Cargo Liners: An Illustrated History [Hardcover]

Ambrose Greenway
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.


Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition £7.34  
Hardcover --  
Paperback £18.99  

Book Description

16 April 2009
For 100 years, between 1850 and 1950, the cargo liner grew to dominate the world's trade routes, providing regular services that merchants, shippers and importers could rely on; they carried much of the world's higher value manufactured goods and raw materials and their services spread to most corners of the world. This new book, evocatively illustrated with a magnificent collection of more than 300 photographs, begins with the establishment of routes around Europe and across the North Atlantic in the 1850s. Not until the Liverpool ship owner and engineer, Alfred Holt, developed high-pressure compound engines were coal-powered vessels able to steam further afield, to the Far East and Australia. The opening of the Suez Canal in 1869 cemented the dominance of the cargo liner and not until the appearance of the first container ship in the 1950s was that dominance threatened. With its informative introductory texts and abundant photographs, this book will appeal to all those who mourn the passing of the golden age of the steamship.


Product details

  • Hardcover: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Seaforth Publishing (16 April 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 184832006X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1848320062
  • Product Dimensions: 26.4 x 24.6 x 1.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 853,554 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

About the Author

AMBROSE GREENWAY has had a lifetime interest in merchant shipping and is involved in many aspects of the maritime scene, ranging from journalism to parliamentary matters. He has written a number of books on cross-channel and North Sea passenger ships and is also a well-respected marine photographer. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
37 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A tribute to the golden age of the steamship 22 July 2009
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
This is a beautifully produced and profusely illustrated book, although it's a pity that the cover is not that depicted in the image on this site.

As the dust jacket states, cargo liners were "some of the most handsome and elegant ships ever built" and this book is indeed a "feast for ship enthusiasts and for all those who mourn the passing of the golden age of the steamship".

Well over 2,000 different ships are listed in the index and over 300 excellent photographs cover the century of the classic cargo liner - "the backbone of empire" - until it was eclipsed by the container ship in the 1970s.

As a teenager in the 1960s I watched some of these cargo liners sail past Tilbury. I was privileged to see the classic lines of these majestic vessels close up and, later, when at sea in HM Ships, I saw some of the last of these fine ships at sea. This book is a lovely trip down memory lane and many other readers who lived near a major port, or went to sea themselves, or who just love ships, will feel so, too. For who cannot look at the photograph of the Ellerman liner "City of Coventry", in Singapore, and see something of beauty, the smell of the sea, the mystery of the Orient and the tale of an ancient mariner? Who cannot look at the silhouette of the unnamed ship on the back cover and wonder who she is and where she goes, and what does she carry - a cargo of ivory or diamonds, of cedarwood or cinnamon, or just iron-ware and cheap tin trays?
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A feast for ship fanatics 8 Mar 2010
Format:Hardcover
This book comprehensively covers the cargo liner from its Liverpool origin in the 1860s through the exciting period as the nations of the world bounced back from World War II to compete on the oceans with style and grace - ending with its decline as the container revolution changed shipping forever. These were the days when ships looked like ships rather than office blocks! The book is full of excellent pictures but more importantly provides background and history on the ships, ship types, their companies and the trade in general. Within these pages the reader can enter the world inhabited by the last true Mariners. No slight is intended on today's seafarers but the life and culture of those times was closer to the traditions of men committed to a life and love of the sea. The ships had character and the industry style. Without overstating it Ambrose Greenway manages to convey this romance to the cognoscenti.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Sheer excellence in print! 17 Jun 2014
By Ned Middleton HALL OF FAME TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
Earlier this year, I was introduced to “Tramp Ships: An Illustrated History” and “Coasters: An Illustrated History” both of which are by Roy Fenton and Seaforth Publishing. To complete a trio of extraordinary books, this work in the same series, albeit by another author (Ambrose Greenaway) is a further example of sheer excellence in print.

As I frequently mention, I am a shipwreck historian (it’s what I do) and, in order to completely understand any ship which was lost at sea, I find myself studying almost anything and everything associated with the subject. Most vessels fall easily into an appropriate category such as; passenger-liner, passenger-ferry, vehicle-ferry, bulk-carrier, tanker, aircraft carrier or whatever. The cargo-liner, however, is often regarded as something of a crossbreed - being neither a freighter nor a passenger-liner but still possessing something of both.

Instead of ignoring the ‘awkwardness’ of such hybrids, Ambrose Greenaway has produced a remarkable document which traces the origins and the history of the cargo-liner from the earliest years right through to the latest designs and innovations and, of course, the decline of the type in favour of containerisation. How sad that ‘Travel by Cargo Ship’ is no longer as easy or as cheap (and, therefore as much fun!) as it used to be - but I digress!
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars excellant book 21 Jan 2011
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
An excellant book, with information in it that would be hard to find elsewhere. The introductory section alone has some excellant information, such as the differences between between tramp and cargo-liners. Throughout, the fantastic black and white photos. The authour should be congratulated on his knowledge, and willingness to share it with the world. The only very small gripe is that the cover is not as illustrated. Having said that it is probably a better picture so it isn't really a gripe!
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.7 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sheer excellence in print! 17 Jun 2014
By Ned Middleton - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Earlier this year, I was introduced to "Tramp Ships: An Illustrated History" and "Coasters: An Illustrated History" both of which are by Roy Fenton and Seaforth Publishing. To complete a trio of extraordinary books, this work in the same series, albeit by another author (Ambrose Greenaway) is a further example of sheer excellence in print.

As I frequently mention, I am a shipwreck historian (it's what I do) and, in order to completely understand any ship which was lost at sea, I find myself studying almost anything and everything associated with the subject. Most vessels fall easily into an appropriate category such as; passenger-liner, passenger-ferry, vehicle-ferry, bulk-carrier, tanker, aircraft carrier or whatever. The cargo-liner, however, is often regarded as something of a crossbreed - being neither a freighter nor a passenger-liner but still possessing something of both.

Instead of ignoring the `awkwardness' of such hybrids, Ambrose Greenaway has produced a remarkable document which traces the origins and the history of the cargo-liner from the earliest years right through to the latest designs and innovations and, of course, the decline of the type in favour of containerisation. How sad that `Travel by Cargo Ship' is no longer as easy or as cheap (and, therefore as much fun!) as it used to be - but I digress!

By repeating the `Contents Page' of this richly illustrated work, the reader will gain an appreciation of what to expect: Origins & Early Years, Consolidation, Innovations in Machinery & German competition, World War 1, Difficult Trading and the Rise of the Motorship, Depression & Renaissance, US Maritime Commissions Shipbuilding Programme & WW2 Construction, Postwar Reconstruction, New Design and Innovation and, fin ally, Apogee & Decline as Containerisation Spreads. The work then concludes with a Bibliography and Index. Having started at the very beginning, each subsequent chapter skilfully adds the next relevant segments of information so that the complete story of the cargo-liner is fully explained. In addition that `explanation' is both well-researched and well-written.

The book itself measures 10¼ x 9½ in (260 x 241 mm) and contains 184 pages. There are 1-3 first class historic photographs of ships on every page and those, coupled with an informative, well-researched and easy to read text, makes this book outstanding by any standards.

Whereas the history, development and evolution of, for example, big passenger ships and warships (of all types) are well documented, the same is not so for the many different types of less glamorous commercial vessels. Of these it might (only might!) be argued that the cargo-liner is possibly the most overlooked of all. Now that gap is filled by a work which is unlikely to disappoint anyone at all.

NM
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A history of marchant shipping 17 Feb 2013
By John A. Fornshell - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This book is in fact primarily an illustrated history. The figure captions are very well written. The black and white images are excellent, large format and of good quality. As a ship modeler, I found it to be very interesting as a source of visual information about a form of merchant shipping that is rapidly disappearing from the seas.
4.0 out of 5 stars If you are fascinated by maritime things like I am 22 July 2014
By Bayard B. - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
If you are fascinated by maritime things like I am, then this is a book for you! It describes cargo liners for the past 140 years with pictures and text that discusses the technological advances incorporated into the many ships and also a little history of the companies that operated them. It includes cargo ships as well as more specialized ones such as refrigerator ships. It discusses advances such as welding, development of cranes and derricks, coal and oil fueling, VTE engines, diesel, and steam turbine propulsion.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback