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The Candy Shop War [Audiobook] [Audio CD]

Brandon Mull , Emily Janice Card
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Shadow Mountain; Unabridged edition (Aug 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590389336
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590389331
  • Product Dimensions: 17.1 x 15.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,757,828 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
By Amanda Richards VINE VOICE
Format:Hardcover
World domination has a sweet tooth in Brandon Mull's latest fantasy adventure, about four kids who discover that too much candy can be REALLY bad for your health.

After a rather exciting prologue, the book slows to a moderate pace, with the new kid in town having to prove himself in order to join three other kids in their club. He does this by performing an impetuous* act which establishes him not only as a club member, but as a firm enemy of the inevitable gang of neighborhood bullies.

The next phase of the story revolves around the owner of a new sweet shop, who makes original confectionary in various forms, ranging from magical to addictive. Mrs. White, owner of the aforementioned shop, soon has the kids doing odd jobs in exchange for treats, but as the jobs get odder and odder, they begin to think there may be more tricks than treats in her bag.

Before long, the kids are breaking and entering, operating voodoo dolls, shape shifting, defying gravity and robbing graves, until an encounter with another magical sweet maker and a meeting with a stranger shifts their respective perspectives** somewhat. By the time you wrap your brain around all of that, Mull throws in a few space-time continuum mind teasers, takes you through the looking glass and then channels Ponce de Leon and the Holy Grail a la Indiana Jones.***

The sour drop I mentioned in the title of this review hit me early in the book, where the author on several occasions gratuitously* describes minor characters by their skin color, and then when the children magically change their appearances, he takes pains to mention not only that they change race, but also unnecessarily gives them a few stereotypical* traits in case you missed the previous race reference.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A great read! 14 July 2011
Format:Paperback
This was the first Brandon Mull novel I ever read and I have to say, I thoroughly enjoyed the experience! The imaginative, unique storyline kept me engaged and I never knew where it was going to take me. I then started reading the Fablehaven series and they haven't let me down either. Mr Mull is a very good writer. The Candy Shop War is an easier read than the Fablehaven stories but, as all good children's literature should be, well written and fun! Buy it!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars  194 reviews
58 of 63 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars something fantastic and full of action 11 Sep 2007
By Heather Brush - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Never take candy from a stranger! Brandon Mull, New York Times bestselling author of "Fablehaven," likes to use the messages we all hear as kids, like, "Drink your milk," and this traditional warning to stay away from strangers bearing sweets. The similarities to anything you've heard before stop there. "The Candy Shop War" is something completely new and different, and I might add, something fantastic and full of action.

Brandon Mull has created a whole new world where special candy can make kids float, shoot electric shocks from their fingers, and even enter the land of wonder through the looking glass...but it isn't anything wonderful in there! Nate is new to the neighborhood, having just moved in, and the friends he makes in the first days will become the truest sort he can hope for. They will come to rely on each other in ways they never could have imagined. The kids start doing after school chores for the owner of a new candy shop in return for special treats. Here's where that warning comes in to never take candy from people you don't know. The chores turn into assignments, which turn out to be quite dangerous and progressively wrong. The temptation might seem sweet but Nate and his friend Trevor decide to hang in there for other reasons. There is a mystery to be solved, and it turns out that there is a rival candy seller who has an interest in what is discovered. A great legend comes into play, and while talking dogs and horses are very cool, what is going on is becoming terribly bad. It's up to Nate and his friends to put a stop to it, if they aren't eaten by giant black widow spiders, or turned to bones and dust first.

This middle grade reader is fantastically full of adventure and fun of a completely different sort. While there is magic and wonder involved, it isn't like anything published in recent history. The underlying messages are well thought out, while the characters steal the show. Kids aged 8-12 will see themselves as Nate figures out what to do to save the day, and even as he bounces from rooftop to rooftop. Who wouldn't love to give their teacher fudge in order to make her forget about assigning homework? The writing is, as always, a pleasure to partake of. Brandon Mull is a gifted author who knows how to reach out to his readers even when giving them those important reminders to drink milk and not take candy from strangers. I will anxiously await even more published work from this author, and Shadow Mountain.
26 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another hit! 20 Sep 2007
By ST - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
My students (I really am a school librarian)love Brandon Mull's books as much as I do and I'm thrilled to know that a Utah author is making it big. If you haven't discovered him, I promise you won't be disappointed! The action is lively right from the beginning, the characters are well-written and engaging and Mull doesn't talk down to his readers. You can't go wrong.
One note: How did all the editors of this new book miss a glaring error? It says (page 38) that Jefferson and Madison died on the same day, July 4th. Jefferson and ADAMS died on the same day, July 4th, 1826, and Monroe, not Madison, died five years later on July 4th.
29 of 36 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Definitely Different 25 Jun 2008
By Dr. Jane Nixon White - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
The Candy Shop War is definitely a departure from Brandon Mull's highly successful Fablehaven series. A stand-alone book, though as full of magic as the Fablehaven series is, that is where the similarity ends. The magic here is darker, and more violent, and could be frightening to younger children. The main characters are believable as children, but the narrative is often stilted to the point of feeling almost contrived. The vocabulary level is extremely rich, but the author seems to go out of his way to use the most difficult word choice possible, which at times distracts, and is sometimes annoying. After enjoying the Fablehaven books, I was disappointed in this book. I had to make myself keep reading to the end.
20 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A sweet idea, but with a few sour drops in the mix 29 Oct 2007
By Amanda Richards - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
World domination has a sweet tooth in Brandon Mull's latest fantasy adventure, about four kids who discover that too much candy can be REALLY bad for your health.

After a rather exciting prologue, the book slows to a moderate pace, with the new kid in town having to prove himself in order to join three other kids in their club. He does this by performing an impetuous* act which establishes him not only as a club member, but as a firm enemy of the inevitable gang of neighborhood bullies.

The next phase of the story revolves around the owner of a new sweet shop, who makes original confectionary in various forms, ranging from magical to addictive. Mrs. White, owner of the aforementioned shop, soon has the kids doing odd jobs in exchange for treats, but as the jobs get odder and odder, they begin to think there may be more tricks than treats in her bag.

Before long, the kids are breaking and entering, operating voodoo dolls, shape shifting, defying gravity and robbing graves, until an encounter with another magical sweet maker and a meeting with a stranger shifts their respective perspectives** somewhat. By the time you wrap your brain around all of that, Mull throws in a few space-time continuum mind teasers, takes you through the looking glass and then channels Ponce de Leon and the Holy Grail a la Indiana Jones.***

The sour drop I mentioned in the title of this review hit me early in the book, where the author on several occasions gratuitously* describes minor characters by their skin color, and then when the children magically change their appearances, he takes pains to mention not only that they change race, but also unnecessarily gives them a few stereotypical* traits in case you missed the previous race reference. The book would have felt no pain from the surgical removal of these references.

As imaginative and innovative as Fablehaven and its sequel Rise of the Evening Star, Candy Shop sometimes gets carried away with its cleverness, at times overdosing the reader with too much of a good thing. Notwithstanding* the aforementioned problems, however, the unique story line and interesting characters and character development makes for good reading if you don't mind the occasional inedible bit.

* big word
** two big rhyming words
*** I watch a lot of movies, don't I?

Amanda Richards, October 30, 2007
18 of 24 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Dissappointing book 5 Oct 2010
By R. Hansen - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
After reading the entire Fablehaven series outloud to my kids we were all excited to start The Candy Shop War. Unfortunately we only made it through the first 7 chapters before we decided it was not for us. I cannot complain about the writing, it's great. What I simply could not overlook was the fact that all the main characters were morally corrupt. In the Fablehaven series the kids (although some poor choices were made) were basically good kids, trying to do the right thing, as were many of the main characters. There was a clear distinction between good and evil. Where is the good in The Candy Shop War? The old lady running the candy shop is manipulative and using the kids. The kids are willing to lie and mislead their own parents, break in and enter a museum to steal artifacts, and even amongst the supposed best friends quartet, one kid was made fun of by the others. It was impossibly to feel a connection for these kids, or cheer them on for that matter. There are plenty of books available with kids who have admirable qualities. The two stars are given for the technical quality of the writing which is really good. Too bad this story was so flat and uninspiring.
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