or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
Id like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism [Abridged, Audiobook] [Audio CD]

Doris Kearns Goodwin , Edward Herrmann
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
RRP: 28.31
Price: 25.00 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
You Save: 3.31 (12%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it Monday, 25 Aug.? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, Large Print 21.66  
Paperback 12.31  
MP3 CD, Audiobook 23.53  
Audio, CD, Abridged, Audiobook 25.00  

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Audible.co.uk, an Amazon Company, is home to more than 100,000 audiobook downloads. Start a 30-day free trial today and get your first audiobook for FREE.




Product details

  • Audio CD: 13 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio; Abridged edition (5 Nov 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1442362626
  • ISBN-13: 978-1442362628
  • Product Dimensions: 14.6 x 13.5 x 3.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,051,857 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Doris Kearns Goodwin is the doyenne of US presidential historians, and one of the most acclaimed non-fiction authors in the world. She won the Pulitzer Prize for History in 1995.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great work of history and politics literature 14 Jun 2014
By Denis Vukosav TOP 100 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
"The Bully Pulpit" by Doris Kearns Goodwin is a comprehensive book about the events that marked the American and world history, events which due to 100 years gap seem far away, but in many ways they're similar to those of today because history repeats itself...

Doris Kearns Goodwin who won Pulitzer Prize for "No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt" is renowned biographer and historian, while most attention attracted her biographies of several US Presidents.
This time she's telling the story about great friendship of William Howard Taft and Theodore Roosevelt that was in grand style terminated in 1912 and resulted in ferocious battle for the Republican Presidential nomination.
As is well known, Taft had been nominated for Republican candidate, but Democrat Woodrow Wilson took the victory overwhelmingly defeating Republican candidate.

Wilson's election had a huge impact on world history due to American entry into World War I, but also major impact on US due to the adoption of a number of laws that in many ways changed the American society and economy.

Therefore it can only be guessed which direction would national and world politics, as well as the history go, if the conflict of these two close friends didn't happen.

One of the important aspects of the book which the author gives a lot of space is press of those days and the origins of term "muckraking".
She's giving extensive explanation of situation that caused this type of journalism to appear, that since then, in some variations, accompanies not only the US but world politics as well.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Bully!" 30 Mar 2014
By D. C. Stolk TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
According to the Oxford English Dictionary, "bully pulpit" means "a public office or position of authority that provides its occupant with an outstanding opportunity to speak out on any issue." It was first used by Theodore Roosevelt, when asked for his view on the presidency, in this quotation: "I suppose my critics will call that preaching, but I have got such a bully pulpit!" The word bully itself was an adjective in the lingo of the time meaning "first- rate," somewhat comparable to the recent use of the word "awesome." Hence the title of this review. The term "bully pulpit" is still used today to describe the president's power to influence the public.

"The Bully Pulpit" clocks in at a hefty 928 pages in the hardcover edition and is lavishly illustrated. Each chapter starts with a contemporary photograph or cartoon beneath the chapter-title, and there's a separate photograph-section that has 68 photographs. Although a massive tome, it should be noted that "only" about 56% of the book consists of the main narrative. The rest of the volume is taken up by the extensive endnotes and index.

Rather than write another biography about a famous American President, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Doris Kearns Goodwin has chosen for a different approach. In "The Bully Pulpit", she recounts the birth of America's Progressive Era through the close friendship between two Presidents: Theodore Roosevelt and his successor William Howard Taft. But rather than focusing exclusively on these two, she enlivens her account by twisting through the narrative the story of the "muckrakers" (another term coined by TR): the group of investigative journalists from magazine McClure's.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Format:Hardcover
The Bully Pulpit is another great book by Doris Kearns Goodwin. Doris Kearns Goodwin has written some exceptional books in the past (No Ordinary Time, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, The Home Front in World War II “which won the Pulitzer Prize for History in 1995”, Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln) but I think this book is better than all of them. In The Bully Pulpit the author profiles Theodore Roosevelt and the Progressive Era and what she believes is the golden age of journalism. The book explores what made Theodore Roosevelt what many experts consider one of our greatest presidents in American history. The book also goes into Roosevelt's great relationship with the media of the day. How that mutually beneficial relationship with investigative reporters like Ida Tarbell, Ray Baker, Lincoln Steffens, and William Allen White helped him craft the messages realized to the American people. The book looks at Roosevelt's relationship with William Howard Taft and how he played a significant role in the Roosevelt administration as a friend, confidant, and as Roosevelt’s secretary of war. This book is expertly written as all of Doris Kearns Goodwin's books are. I found myself in traced within the world she sculpts within her narrative.

Thank you for reading my review.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars The Bully Pulpit by DK Goodwin 19 Dec 2013
Format:Hardcover
A Great Book - splendid and I love every word of it. DKG always wins
with writing around
history with these compelling personalities as anchors.

BUT
I have the CD version of it from Amazon- for some reason it is
not on Audible - and the CD version is not working properly
on my IPHONE. I thus have downloaded the Kindle version to
search as needed. If you want CDs for the car etc
that's fine but I am most annoyed with the download onto
the Iphone.

However, it is such a strong book that I enjoy every (repeated:)
minute of the listen. I would v much like to see DKG's
Lyndon Johnson book on AUDIBLE.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars  1,199 reviews
194 of 234 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Book for Our Times To 5 Nov 2013
By BookVodney - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
A bully pulpit is a position sufficiently conspicuous to provide an opportunity to speak out and be listened to. Teddy Roosevelt coined this term and lived by it to set the direction of the 20th century with regard to role of the Presidency versus the capitalist elite. This wonderful book frames the man's character by presenting Roosevelt as a man making a stance by enforcing the Sherman Act of 1890 (an antitrust law) that was basically over looked while the big business bosses established their vast monopolies & power in the late 19th to earlier 20th century. Roosevelt a New York upper-class milieu confronts his fellow upper class rival J.P. Morgan by braking up his trans- ocean stream ship & railroad line thereby enforcing the Sherman Act. Typically monopolists caught bending this law were addressed behind closed door deals rather than on a national public stage. Roosevelt's and his people took the fight to Morgan & won a Supreme Court decision.

You will read about the friendship & common cause between two Republican comrades that wish to reform and clean up corruption in politics. William Howard Taft and Theodore Roosevelt both emerge as Progressive Republicans and soon become friends. Taft came from a privileged back ground as well, but had a mild manner wishing to please family versus Teddy's driven ambition to confront and change America. Roosevelt brings Taft along as his Secretary of war then supports him as his successor.

Ms. Goodwin has cleverly developed the story of these two men by showing the path of Taft as President to push congress to reform big business through regulatory amendments and measures to enforce them, while Roosevelt who regretted not pursuing another term wishes to take action on child labor and women's work issues. Roosevelt advocated social engineering measures such as income & inheritance taxes, food safety, political reform, and direct primaries. Too big of a step for President Taft & leader of the Republican party. The discontented Roosevelt tried to regain the nomination of his party and failed to unseat Taft who was backed by the old guard Republicans. Roosevelt the perpetual fighter dislodged the continuity of his former party by forming the Bull Moose Party. The fractioned Republicans lose - leading to a win for the Democrat Woodrow Wilson in 1912.

The book visits the beginning of "muckrakers". The author will take you deep into this subject and explain the origin which is relevant to the path of politics throughout the 20th century and thrives today. The muckrakers were investigative reporters that exposed corrupt politicians and business leaders at all levels . Roosevelt used the term in a speech dedicating the Congress Administrative building, but he did not intend or foresee the use of the word as its meaning evolved.

Ms. Goodwin, a million-selling author and television commentator, known to all for her big smile has hit the ball squarely on the bat with this grand slam of a book. This one will equal or exceed her last book "Team of Rivals", published eight years ago, a phenomenon success. "The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism" is more than 900 pages and takes you to a critical time in American history in interesting & vivid detail. It's coincidental how the disjointed Republican party of the early 20th century is not unlike the Republicans of today (a 100 years later)with the Tea Party causing a fracture in the Party's politics. History always repeats itself. No brainer - read this book!!
91 of 109 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Bully!" 9 Nov 2013
By D. C. Stolk - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
According to the Oxford English Dictionary, "bully pulpit" means "a public office or position of authority that provides its occupant with an outstanding opportunity to speak out on any issue." It was first used by Theodore Roosevelt, when asked for his view on the presidency, in this quotation: "I suppose my critics will call that preaching, but I have got such a bully pulpit!" The word bully itself was an adjective in the lingo of the time meaning "first- rate," somewhat comparable to the recent use of the word "awesome." Hence the title of this review. The term "bully pulpit" is still used today to describe the president's power to influence the public.

"The Bully Pulpit" clocks in at a hefty 928 pages in the hardcover edition, the reason why I chose the e-book version, and is lavishly illustrated. Each chapter starts with a contemporary photograph or cartoon beneath the chapter-title, and there's a separate photograph-section at the back of the e-book that has 68 photographs. Although a massive tome, it should be noted that "only" about 56% of the book consists of the main narrative. The rest of the volume is taken up by the extensive endnotes and index.

Rather than write another biography about a famous American President, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Doris Kearns Goodwin has chosen for a different approach. In "The Bully Pulpit", she recounts the birth of America's Progressive Era through the close friendship between two Presidents: Theodore Roosevelt and his successor William Howard Taft. But rather than focusing exclusively on these two, she enlivens her account by twisting through the narrative the story of the "muckrakers" (another term coined by TR): the group of investigative journalists from magazine McClure's. In this magazine, they published popular exposes of fraudulent railroads and millionaire senators, aiding Roosevelt in his quest for change and fairness.

Author Goodwin starts her narrative with ex-president TR's return from a hunting trip to Africa in 1910. Then, switching between the two in alternating chapters, she charts the lives of Roosevelt and Taft from boyhood to maturity, and presents their wives Nellie Taft and Edith Roosevelt, before introducing McClure's Magazine and it's reporters.

Through this lengthy preamble, she brilliantly contrasts their very different childhoods and careers, as well as their differences in style and personality, a foreshadowing of the causes that would lead to one of the major political feuds of the age. Polar opposites, they still became firm friends, almost from the moment they first met in Washington at the beginning of their political careers.

The meat of the book concerns the period when Roosevelt became President, after President McKinley was assassinated in 1901. As President, T.R.'s goals were: "to distribute the nation's wealth more equitably, regulate the giant corporations and railroads, strengthen the rights of labor, and protect the country's natural resources from private exploitation." Roosevelt coined the phrase "Square Deal" to describe his domestic agenda, and developed a mutually beneficial relationship with the national press so they worked together to bring on the progressive era.

His close friend Taft became an indispensable member of President Roosevelt's cabinet and later his handpicked successor, after Roosevelt decided not to run for a third term. On TR's return in 1910 he broke bitterly with President Taft on issues of progressivism and when in the 1912 election Roosevelt failed to block Taft's re-nomination, he launched the Bull Moose Party, which ultimately led to them both losing to Democrat Woodrow Wilson, who became President.

In the epilogue, author Goodwin touchingly describes how the old friends reconciled during a chance meeting not long before Roosevelt's death in 1919, how Taft in 1921 finally got the position he had always longed for, that of Chief Justice of the United States, and how the members of the original McClure's magazine staff stayed in touch with each other into old age.

Goodwin's narrative is founded upon an abundance of primary materials, like the extensive correspondence between Roosevelt and Taft; the diaries of Edith Roosevelt and Nellie Taft and the journals, memoirs and hundreds of letters the "muckrakers" wrote to one another, to name but a few of the sources she used in writing "The Bully Pulpit".

While the narrative sometimes seems to get bogged down in minutiae, you won't be sorry to read about "Will and Teedie" and the muckrakers, as this account is far more than just a biography of "that damned cowboy president" Roosevelt and of the man nicknamed "Big Bill" in his younger years, William Howard Taft. It is also a detailed portrait of an era as well as a history of the press, all of this combined into one eminently readable book.

For those wishing to read more about Theodore Roosevelt, I recommend the biographical trilogy by Edmund Morris: "The Rise Of Theodore Roosevelt," "Theodore Rex" and "Colonel Roosevelt". Or if made curious for the full story on the digging of the Panama Canal, I recommend: "The Path Between the Seas" by David McCullough.
Strangely, there is not much available on William Howard Taft, the only American ever to have been both President and Chief Justice of the United States. Maybe time for an author of the caliber of a Chernow, Isaacson or Morris to write a biography that does justice to the man.
185 of 229 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Hit, But Not a Home Run 10 Nov 2013
By Paul - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Doris Kearns Goodwin is a very popular historian, whose last work Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln was widely acclaimed, and therefore I was expectant of another such achievement in this new book, but it just wasn't for me.

The research is extensive, the notes on primary sources exhaustive, the writing style is, as with all her work, excellent, but the book is too much. I can't help but think of a George Harrison song, Long Long Long.

The first one hundred fifty pages are bios of TR and Taft, and their families. There is nothing new here. There have been so many works on Roosevelt, and I felt that Edmund Morris covered his early years best in The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt (Modern Library Paperbacks). While the information is good, it is too much.

The writing concerning the "golden age of journalism" is good and an important part of the story of our nation's reform from more than one hundred years ago.

The relationship between Taft and TR is the most interesting of the book, and that part moved quickly, and the differences in style and personality are nicely portrayed, but the inclusion of so many things from the journalism side just cluttered up the work. The book would have been less cumbersome and more interesting if the focus had been on the two men, with the journalism portion given only a supporting role.

In the end, the split between the two great men ushered Woodrow Wilson into the White House. We are all left to speculate what changes in the outcome of the Great War would have occurred had TR been in the White House when the Germans went through Belgium in August, 1914.

The book is a good read, but not in the magnitude of her last work.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Teddy and Big Bill 20 Dec 2013
By Mark R. Brewer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
The great thing about this book is that we come to know Theodore Roosevelt and William H. Taft quite well. Roosevelt was amazing--assertive, confident, and fairly bursting with energy. He was impossible to ignore, and his forceful personality enabled him to accomplish much during his seven-plus years as president. But it was Taft who was the more likable--honest, compassionate, kind, and a better president than he gets credit for. The relationship between the two is fascinating. They were intimate friends for years, and Roosevelt was instumental in Taft becoming his successor in the White House.

But their friendship fell apart when Roosevelt decided that Taft had not lived up to Roosevelt's progressive legacy. Thus, Roosevelt believed he had to run against Taft for the Republican nomination in 1912, and when Roosevelt failed to get the nomination, he decided to run as a third-party candidate. In so doing, he split the Republican vote with Taft, which allowed Democrat Woodrow Wilson to win the election. Roosevelt's decision to run against Taft seemed to be less about Taft's shortcomings and more about Roosevelt's need to be at the center of attention and power. A few years later, it was the good Mr. Taft who reached out to Roosevelt and caused a reconciliation between the two.

The relationship between Taft and Roosevelt is the best part of this book. Curiously, Ms. Kearns-Goodwin also includes a narrative of the muckraking journalists of the time, particularly those who worked for McCLURE'S magazine. I found this part of the book to be somewhat forced, taking away from the main story. As a result, the book is much longer and more tedious than it needs to be.

Ms. Kearns-Goodwin is a wonderful writer, and her book is, for the most part, a joy to read. But it seems to me she tries too hard to include too much.
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Comments on The Bully Pulpit 18 Dec 2013
By Edward E. Conrad - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
If there were 10 stars I would give them all to Goodwin for this book. I am a physical scientist, but I love to read political history for recreation. Goodwin's books are some of the best. The Bully Pulpit beautifully portrays the political atmosphere at that time and the ultimate confllict between two great Americans. it is a fine description of the personalities of Roosevelt and Taft, together with the influence of their personal home life and spouses. It also presents the opportunity to contemplate the sorry state of our political issues and processes today
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback