£19.95
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Trade in your item
Get a £3.12
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Building of the Green Valley: A Reconstruction of an Early 17th-century Rural Landscape Paperback – 15 May 2006


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£19.95
£13.71 £12.49

Frequently Bought Together

The Building of the Green Valley: A Reconstruction of an Early 17th-century Rural Landscape + Tales From The Green Valley [DVD] + Tudor Monastery Farm [DVD]
Price For All Three: £37.85

Buy the selected items together


Earn a Free Kindle Book
Earn a Free Kindle Book
Buy a book between now and 31 March and receive a promotional code good for one free Kindle book. Terms and conditions apply. Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 210 pages
  • Publisher: Heritage Marketing & Publications Ltd (15 May 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1905223137
  • ISBN-13: 978-1905223138
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 17.1 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 185,405 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

About the Author

Stuart Peachey graduated from Reading in 1977 with a BA Hons, in Human Geography doing his postgraduate teaching qualification at St Paul's College Cheltenham 1978-79. His other qualifications vary from mountain leadership to food hygiene. Interested in military history from an early age, after arriving at Reading he was recruited to a new English Civil War Unit based at the University. When asked in 1983 to run a living history in Gosport he found there was no suitable venue and suggested that they built one from scratch. Recruiting a team of 35 volunteers who worked 15 hours a day for up to 15 days they constructed a hamlet which the council decided to retain. The funds accidentally raised by this project were used to buy the Green Valley site where over nearly 20 years over 500 volunteers from 28 countries have toiled to restore and maintain an early 17th century agricultural landscape. Stuart carried out the majority of the supporting historical research and the organization of the site development in parallel with careers in lecturing, commercial banking and the Yorkshire Dales National Park. He has written or co written over 110 small specialist publications on period food, agriculture, living history topics and the English Civil War and contributed to a substantial number of radio and TV programmes and magazines on historical matters. In 1987 he co founded Historical Management Associates Ltd which has developed a publishing arm, runs period feasts and carries out consultancy work among other activities. In his spare time he is an active mountain walker and caver and father of three boys.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Morning Star on 15 July 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the only book to accompany the Tales of the Green Valley DVDs and is an account of how the landscape and the buildings used in the series came into being. The whole valley was created by volunteers, and reading this account gives an idea of how long and hard the journey was. I wish I'd been there. Mr. Peachey manages to convey the joys as well as the difficulties of this immense project and it is a pity that he was not allowed to discuss the making of the BBC documentaries. Looking at the lavishly produced coffee table Victorian Farm and Edwardian Fram books, one feels regret that the BBC/powers that be could not be bothered to collaborate with Mr Peachey on a similar volume for the Green Valley. Shame, BBC. Until that happens, if ever, this small but very enjoyable volume will have to stand in its place. More plaese, Mr Peachey.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Nicholas Casley TOP 500 REVIEWER on 5 Nov 2014
Format: Paperback
‘The Building of the Green Valley’ is not the book of the TV series that was the progenitor of the ‘Victorian Farm’ etc programmes. Instead, the subtitle of Stuart Peachey ‘s book places the focus elsewhere: ‘The Restoration of an Early Seventeenth-Century Agricultural Landscape’.

Peachey’s team (not the four in the TV series) worked for fifteen years prior to the arrival of the film crews and continued long after they had gone. Peachey himself relates how, “the filming was only a minor episode in the site’s history, which served to raise funds for the site and caused a modest amount of damage and irritation, soon forgotten. The real work of reconstruction continued.”

He is perhaps a little curmudgeonly here, since the series showed that he did get a new cowshed and an enlarged privy as well as a field cleared of bracken and brambles. Of the fourteen chapters, only one short one is devoted to the year of filming. It is full of the myriad preparations that were made but Peachey informs us that, “For contractual reasons I cannot reveal what actually occurred during the filming.”

Peachey’s story in fact starts in Gosport in June 1984, at a Living History week sanctioned by the local council. Having caught the bug, he and his group ended up in the south Welsh Marches where the ‘green valley’ can be found (if you look hard enough). He writes, “We had a clear idea of what we were setting out to achieve. Our aim was to restore the whole agricultural landscape, from buildings to weeds, to its probable condition in the early seventeenth century.”

In the meantime there are battles with the planners, battles with the locals, battles with thieves. We must take into account that we only hear Peachey’s side of the story, of course.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By S. Clark on 2 Sep 2009
Format: Paperback
This is a great book and made watching the DVD even more enjoyable! It gave you a real insight into what they had to do for the series.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Stargazer on 14 Feb 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
An interesting read about how the Green Valley settlement came into being, but next to nothing about the series itself: probably what prompted most people to have bought the book in the first place. To be fair to Stuart Peachey, he does mention that contractual problems prevented this, in which case when can we expect a book about the experiences of Alex, Chloe, Peter and Ruth during the year they lived there?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It is a fascinating read. I appreciate the list of heritage fruit, etc. included in the book, and he extensive bibliography.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback