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The Bromeliad Trilogy: Truckers - Diggers - Wings Hardcover – 5 Nov 1998


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Doubleday Childrens; First Thus edition (5 Nov. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385410441
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385410441
  • Product Dimensions: 14.7 x 3.9 x 22.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 260,820 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Sir Terry Pratchett was the acclaimed creator of the global bestselling Discworld series, the first of which, The Colour of Magic, was published in 1983. In all, he was the author of fifty bestselling books. His novels have been widely adapted for stage and screen, and he was the winner of multiple prizes, including the Carnegie Medal, as well as being awarded a knighthood for services to literature. Worldwide sales of his books now stand at 70 million, and they have been translated into thirty-seven languages.

Sir Terry Pratchett died on 12th March 2015

Photography © David Bird

Product Description

Amazon Review

"In the Beginning there was Arnold Bros (est 1905), the great department store...." and so begins Terry Pratchett's hugely entertaining and effervescent The Bromeliad trilogy.

From the First Book of the Nomes, Truckers where the nomes have to face up to the harsh reality that their comfortable and somewhat lazy lives beneath the floorboards of mankind are threatened; through to Diggers where the battle for survival really begins; culminating in Wings as the intrepid Masklin, with the aid of the electrical Thing, plots to return the nomes to Home on a Ship that will take them back to the stars where they belong, Pratchett never fails to excite.

With his amazing sense of the ridiculous and his sly, witty, ironic wordsmithery this intelligent and occasionally totally ludicrous three-in-one fantasy combo certainly does nothing to detract from Pratchett's reputation as one of the coolest and cultiest writers of his era. --Susan Harrison

Review

"TRUCKERS, DIGGERS, WINGS" "As always, [Terry Pratchett] is head and shoulders above even the best of the rest. He is screamingly funny. He is wise. He has style...Splendid" The Daily Telegraph

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 28 Mar. 2004
Format: Hardcover
Say the word gnomes and most people will think of those rather horrid little figurines that some people in suburbia will insist on littering lawns and gardens with. You know the ones - they have fishing rods, red hats and rosy cheeks.
Well, not these. These are Nomes, thank you very much, and as you will discover they certainly don't have fishing rods. Well...maybe they do if you think of bins as a metaphorical fish pond and a rat as a real treat of a meal.
The story basically follows Masklin and his band of 'outside' nomes who travel indoors (although the Store nomes don't believe in outside so they reckon Masklin is mad). The book follows the trials of this little band of ten inch folk until their eventual adventure. To say more would spoil the story but it is well worth a read. Children will love it and adults will find an excuse ("I was going to read it to my kids, honest!).
Buy it, read it and wonder whether those small blurs really were mice.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By V. Senathit on 16 Jun. 2001
Format: Hardcover
Indeed, being only 4 inches tall does have its advantages, and disadvantages. 4 Inches is the average size of a nome, and they live (apart from other places) in holes and under the floorboards..
I'm not about to give the plot of this book away, all I know is that after reading the first few pages, I was hooked. It is funny and intelligent, and makes you smile and laugh and wanting to read more.
I found this book whilst looking for books from Douglas Adams (RIP), and will continue buying Pratchett's work. If you like a humorous book, buy this one..
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Amy Silverston on 25 Sept. 2009
Format: Paperback
My ten year old and I read this to each other - he did a chapter then so did I. The humour is pitched at the level where he can understand and really appreciate it; often revolving around the nomes' (sic) very literal interpretation of meanings, such as a sign reading 'road works', which they see as superfluous as how can a road not work? This sort of thing really amuses children of this age and they are so pleased when they understand word play. He also understood and agreed with the meaning of various morals along the way. The language was good - construction not too complex for him to read aloud and he learned the meanings of the odd new word.

We both enjoyed it thoroughly and he wants to read more Terry Prachett books whilst waiting for the latest Charlie Higson to come out in paperback (if you haven't tried the young Bond books, do - they are very good indeed, best we have read of that genre of exciting adventure stories).
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Kurt A. Johnson on 23 April 2003
Format: Hardcover
Unknown to the humans, they share the Earth with another intelligent race, the nomes. The reason they don't know about the nomes is that they are four inches tall, and live at a pace ten times that of humans. This is the story of Masklin, and other heroic nomes who lead their people out of the dangerous world of humans, in search of their home. In the course of this story the overcome great obstacles, all with wit and humor.
This book is actually a collection of three book: Truckers, Diggers and Wings. The stories showcase Terry Pratchett's wit and humor, his ability to examine the human experience from a very different viewpoint. The action is gripping, and the humor outrageous. I highly recommend this book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 7 Jan. 2001
Format: Hardcover
When I first started reading the Discworld novels by Terry Pratchett, my Dad thought it was all a load of rubbish and "you wouldn't catch him reading Pratchett." What is it they say about famous last words? Then on a long journey with a friend, he listened to the "Truckers" audio cassette (narrated brilliantly by Tony Robinson), and then had to get the Bromeliad. From there he's gone onto read every Discworld novel, nearly as quickly as me! The Bromeliad is quite simply put, a superbly witty and skilfully written collection, whether for the younger reader who sees it as a story about the "wee folk" or for the older, who can see the parallels with real life, and understand the things that confuse the nomes (such as "and Arnold Bros (est. 1905) put up signs saying "Dogs and Pushchairs must be carried on the escaltors"." And Arnold Bros (est. 1905) waxed wroth, for some people used the escalators carrying neither dog, nor pushchair. "Surely," said the nomes, "humans are stupid, and understand nothing about the world."
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By D.T.Scott on 12 Nov. 2009
Format: Paperback
This is a wonderful, eloquently written work, by Discworld author Terry Pratchett. It's one of those books, that when you finish, you sigh softly, and recall all the great, and bad times the characters have had. If you have so much as a morsel of imagination, this book will leave with a faint, lingering feeling, that somewhere, in your house, a Nome is watching you from behind a crack in the wall... This isn't a bad feeling, just a pleasant, happy feeling, something you probably wouldn't have felt since you were six, when Santa Clause was real.

Read this book, not with the idea that it will have you rolling on your back, stifling your laughter with a fist. Don't expect to be left, sobbing uncontrollable, as you crawl through the last pages of the book. As I said before, this story is a comfortable, cosy sigh. It's something to treasure. Something to come back to on those cold, dark nights. Something to read, remember and recall as you trundle along your life.
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