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The Broken Ear (The Adventures of Tintin) Hardcover – 18 Jul 2003


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Egmont (18 July 2003)
  • Language: French
  • ISBN-10: 1405208058
  • ISBN-13: 978-1405208055
  • Product Dimensions: 22.5 x 0.8 x 30.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 262,457 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Hergé  (Georges Remi) was born in Brussels in 1907. Over the course of 54 years he completed 23 albums of The Adventures of Tintin series, which is now considered to be one of the greatest, if not the greatest, comics series of all time. With translations published in over 80 languages, more than 230 million copies sold worldwide and a Hollywood movie to its name, Tintin dominates the Comics and Graphic Novels chart even today. Sadly, Hergé died in 1983, leaving his 24th album, Tintin and Alph-Art, unfinished, but his hero continues to be one of the most iconic characters in both adult and children’s fiction.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Keris Nine TOP 500 REVIEWER on 14 Jun. 2010
Format: Hardcover
There's an understandable tendency to look dismissively at the earliest solo Tintin adventures - justifiably in some cases. The artwork is somewhat naïve, as are the depictions of the countries that Tintin visits and the racial stereotyping, and the stories themselves suffer from the episodic format that they were originally published in, and there's often no clear overarching story, just a series of adventures based around a theme. On the other hand, the attraction of Tintin's character and the foundations of his investigative nature are established in his exploration of exotic lands, delighting in the diversity of a world rather that is more complicated than it would seem.

In this respect, The Broken Ear is certainly one of the best earliest Tintin exploits and, packed with incident and adventure, it's also one of the most memorable. More than just a series of adventures in a foreign land, there's some real-life relevance to the nature of South American republics in constant revolution, one dictatorial regime replacing another and not appearing to be any different or less cruel, while American investors, oil companies and weapons dealers manipulate the situation for their own ends.

The story starts off innocently enough with Tintin becoming interested in the disappearance of a South American fetish from a museum only for it to be replaced the next day, with its formerly broken ear now suspiciously intact. It's clearly been switched, but why would anyone go to such trouble for an object of little more than ethnographic interest? Tintin follows up the trail of a murdered sculptor and a talking parrot, before finding that the trail leads him right back to San Theodoros and the Arumbaya tribe living in its jungle.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Sebastian Palmer TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 23 Mar. 2012
Format: Paperback
As a grown man I've just finished collecting all the Tintin titles I owned as a kid, plus a few I never had 'back in the day', and I have to say, that while I've changed lot, and that dreamlike state of childhood innocence is hard to recapture, the Tintin books, on the whole, help me get close. They remain enchanting.

I love the hapless ill-fated villains in Tintin And The Broken Ear, Alonso and Ramon. There's a talking parrot, an amnesiac, and general Alcazar makes what I believe is his first appearance. As usual there's some beautiful 'bandes dessinées' artwork from Hergé, the lushly rendered jungle being very evocative, and he pays his usual attention to detail, basing the 'Arumbaya fetish' on a real statuette from an ethnographic museum that, I believe, he discovered in his locality.

As others have noted, this is one of the better Tintin adventures from Hergés earlier period. I loved them all back in the day, and I still love them now. Whether you're a child reading the Tintin adventures for the first time, or an adult returning to them, they remain enchanting.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ernest Maylip on 6 Dec. 2010
Format: Hardcover
I read this when I was 11, in the early 1970's, and thought it was wonderful. It was only years later that I appreciated the humour of the translation (into English). The conversation between the old scientist(missing presumed dead) and the Arumbaya tribe members looks like some foreign language but when read carefully is actually English written phonetically, with a heavy cockney accent. Wonderful stuff.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By birchden on 16 Jan. 2010
Format: Paperback
This is one of the best of the early Tintin stories, with a decent plot and some nicely observed details. Unlike some of the early Tintin adventures, this one has also aged pretty well.

Taking us from Europe to the world of feuding South American dictatorships, this adventure is always entertaining, and also has some jokes that will amuse the grown ups too - like the tongue in cheek references to the Chaco war and arms trader Sir Basil Zaharoff.

There are also some good characters along the way, like General Alcazar who makes his first appearance in this story. Watch out for the nicely drawn jungle landscapes too.

I remember getting this title as a kid in 1976 when it was only just available in the UK - and only then in hardback format. Years later I still kick myself for giving it away to a charity shop when I was a teenager!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There are lots of good Tintin adventures out there (The Black Island, the trip to the Moon, Flight 714 and so on), but I would say that this is my favourite. It has everything you need for a really exciting story - loads of action, daring escapes, mysteries, heroes, villains and very varied settings. It's also one of the most diverse adventures - you get to see Tintin in Europe solving the murder mystery, then in South America, firstly as a colonel then investigating the Arumbaya tribe, and then back to Europe again to finish, with the fast-paced rescue of the Arumbaya fetish - all in one adventure, which doesn't happen very often in the Tintin series. Also a very varied range of characters, such as General Alcazar, the Indians, the villains Alonso and Ramon, and others too. This is the type of adventure where you just want to keep reading on to find out what happens to Tintin next. This could serve as either an excellent introduction to the Tintin series or a fantastic read for those well used to the series too. A really good book all round!
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