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The British at War: Cinema, State and Propaganda, 1939-45 (Cinema and Society) Paperback – 3 Nov 2000

4 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 319 pages
  • Publisher: I.B.Tauris; New edition edition (3 Nov. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1860646271
  • ISBN-13: 978-1860646270
  • Product Dimensions: 15.6 x 2.5 x 23.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 180,352 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

About the Author

James Chapman is Lecturer in Film and Television Studies at the Open University.


Inside This Book

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First Sentence
The potential of the cinema as a medium of national propaganda was widely recognised before the beginning of the Second World War. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book considers the production of war films,including features and shorts during World War 2.The author gives us an insight as to the propaganda apparatus and a view on how well or badly it functioned.The book stictks strictly to its aim to cover only war films and does it in an informative and interesting manner.Only in the conclusion at the end does it lapse in to that dreadful acadamese beloved of those who dwell in higher learning.
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Format: Paperback
There is ultimately a disappointing work with a very conventional viewpoint. There is surely much more to be said about British cinema of WW2 than this. Surely comedy played an important role in British films during the war: Let George Do It and such films were as important as Henry V. Much better to find a copy Raymond Durgnat's inspired A Mirror for England in a second-hand bookstore. Three stars top.
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Format: Hardcover
James Chapman manages to balance the role of cinema and propaganda in the overall context of the Second World War and the home front.
The debate between the feature film and documentary film provide an excellent backdrop to discussion and analysis of the films produced in that era.
A fascinating insight to how cinema and propaganda developed as the Second World War progressed. A very comprehensive piece of work.
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