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The Breaking (The Eternal Dungeon: Rebirth #1)
 
 

The Breaking (The Eternal Dungeon: Rebirth #1) [Kindle Edition]

Dusk Peterson
2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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Product Description

Product Description

"'Do you have any questions?' the Seeker asked. 'About the routine of the dungeon? The times you will be fed? The questions you will be asked? The instruments of torture I use?'"

The prisoner knew that the Eternal Dungeon was a place where suspected criminals were broken by torture, and he was prepared to hold out against any methods used against him – except the method he could not anticipate.

Arrested on the charge of committing a particularly horrendous murder, Elsdon Taylor arrives at the Eternal Dungeon in fear of the harsh methods used by the torturers, called Seekers, to draw confessions from their prisoners.

But his Seeker's methods are for more devious than Elsdon had expected. Now Elsdon is faced with a choice that will shape his future . . . as well as the future of his Seeker.

This suspenseful novella (short novel) can be read on its own or as the first story in The Eternal Dungeon, an award-winning speculative fiction series set in a nineteenth-century prison where the psychologists wield whips. Friendship, family, gay love, and rebellion are intertwining plotlines in the series.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1131 KB
  • Print Length: 85 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Love in Dark Settings Press (7 Jun 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008BJ252S
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #9,950 Free in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Free in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Honored thrice in the Rainbow Awards, Dusk Peterson writes fantasy, historical fantasy, and science fiction. Suspense plays an important role in many of the tales; the conflict in those tales is both external and internal. Peterson's stories are often placed in dark settings, such as prisons or wartime locations. The mood of the stories, however, is not one of unrelieved gloominess: friendship, heterosexual romance, gay love, and faithful service are recurring themes. Visit duskpeterson.com for e-books and free fiction.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars all that glitter 17 Oct 2012
By Furio
Format:Kindle Edition
This is an extract, probably a prologue, of a series titled "The Eternal Dungeon" about which it provides some basic background information.

At first sight this dark fantasy novella appears original.
Through a fluid, competent writing we are given an introduction to a founding institution of an alternative Victorian England: the Eternal Dungeon, a place where prisoners accused of heinous crimes are only tortured for their own sake, so to say. Many big words are spoken about a code of conduct the torturers must apply, a code that certainly represents an improvement on the real British prisons of the times, where people were tortured to obtain a confession no matter what, their innocence a negligible factor in the equation. The interaction between Elsdon and Layle is clever and keep the plot tense and interesting.

While reading these pages I had mixed feelings.
Code of conduct or not, a prison is a prison, certainly not the jolliest of places. A pre-modern prison, where people are tortured, is even less jolly. A nation where people guilty of lesser crimes are beaten by a militia (both soldiers and policemen) looks a little more civilised than one where Newgate was the main prison but only slightly so.
A prison is a great setting for depicting complex characters but it is also true that legal/mystery thrillers (from "Murder She Wrote" to "Perry Mason" to countless others) have this knack for showing humanity at his worst without being really insightful or providing any sort of catharsis. For the likes of me, people who do not care for horror novels nor delight in the intricacies of the -perverted- human mind intent on criminal purposes, a work such of this bears no fascination.
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Amazon.com: 3.8 out of 5 stars  14 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Take it or leave it 25 Mar 2014
By Reading Lady - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
I have problems with this book. The year it takes place is 355, yet no care was taken to set the period. The text reads quite contemporary, replete with misspellings, missing words, and references to things that simply didn't exist until centuries after - pistols (1540s,) sandpaper - 13th century, phosphorous matches - 1669, and chewing gum, which would have been bark tar and not called chewing gum.

The tension is there, sort of. I disagree with another reviewer's assessment that BDSM was used. Prisons, particularly in "days of old," used torture. To overlook this is not understanding the history of jurisprudence. BDSM has a sexual context, so it's reference here isn't valid at all. Also to assign today's sensibilities to a story that takes place in different times makes no sense.

I sense this takes place in an alternate world, don't know for sure. That wasn't clear.

Craft-wise, the writing isn't smooth - it's filled with passive voice and filters - he felt himself get hot. If he didn't who did? That goes without saying when we are in a POV character's head.

List of proofreaders aside, this book needs some strong editing.

I was never immersed in the world, or understood the times they lived in. With references to neighborhoods, etc., I'm not sure the author intended for this to come off as something historical. It had a very modern feel to it, like the Eternal Dungeon co-existed in today's world, underground somewhere.

I don't think I'll read the rest of the series. The historical value is not taken seriously. Truly, I only found the seeker interesting. Also, the price points of the other books is outrageous. Not even remotely realistic.

Also, in 355, surnames weren't used. To not understand this negates the reason to write a historical to begin with.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars all that glitter 17 Oct 2012
By Furio - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
This is an extract, probably a prologue, of a series titled "The Eternal Dungeon" about which it provides some basic background information.

At first sight this dark fantasy novella appears original.
Through a fluid, competent writing we are given an introduction to a founding institution of an alternative Victorian England: the Eternal Dungeon, a place where prisoners accused of heinous crimes are only tortured for their own sake, so to say. Many big words are spoken about a code of conduct the torturers must apply, a code that certainly represents an improvement on the real British prisons of the times, where people were tortured to obtain a confession no matter what, their innocence a negligible factor in the equation. The interaction between Elsdon and Layle is clever and keep the plot tense and interesting.

While reading these pages I had mixed feelings.
Code of conduct or not, a prison is a prison, certainly not the jolliest of places. A pre-modern prison, where people are tortured, is even less jolly. A nation where people guilty of lesser crimes are beaten by a militia (both soldiers and policemen) looks a little more civilised than one where Newgate was the main prison but only slightly so.
A prison is a great setting for depicting complex characters but it is also true that legal/mystery thrillers (from "Murder She Wrote" to "Perry Mason" to countless others) have this knack for showing humanity at his worst without being really insightful or providing any sort of catharsis. For the likes of me, people who do not care for horror novels nor delight in the intricacies of the -perverted- human mind intent on criminal purposes, a work such of this bears no fascination.
Another point of contention for me were the undercurrents of BDSM: there is no actual gore in this pages but it is clear that the impending menace of physical harm is essential to the plot and to its tension, a fact that makes me uncomfortable.

What finally sheds light on the work's meaning and ruins it for me completely is a paragraph in the last pages. The actual story is framed by an introduction and a conclusion written by a fictional scholar investigating the history and merits of the Eternal Dungeon as an institution.

*** SPOILER MIGHT FOLLOW *** - *** SPOILER MIGHT FOLLOW ***

In this paragraph the scholar states that only people whose "guilt had been determined as certain" were sent there to obtain a confession and ascertain whether they had any accomplices. He writes that the torturers' method, though unacceptable, were nonetheless a premise to the developement of psychiatry.
This point goes in pairs with previous statement by a story's character that a truthful confession is needed to free the soul of the criminal from his guilt.

*** END OF SPOILER *** - *** END OF SPOILER ***

The attempt of the author to have its reader see the Dungeon as a primitive psychiatric institution of sorts where the well being of the criminal/patient is the goal backfires entirely.
Ms Peterson's Dungeon may be better than prisons of the past -than some of our present as well, unfortunately- but ethically it is just as cruel. Only someone self righteous and probably bigoted could give so much importance to a "confession".
I cannot but agree with the early statement of the prison's healer who deems all the prison's employees sick.

I am not implying that that self righteous view belongs to the author (she might as well agree with the prison's healer for all we know) but she still bases an entire work of fiction on this assumption and on those ethically uncomfortable BDSM elements.
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting but amateurish 29 Aug 2012
By Rocket - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
The author had some interesting ideas but the writing is amateurish and that got in the way for me. I will hand it to the many proofreaders credited at the end -- they did a great job. If only there had been an editor and writing coach. The product description makes it sound like there will be some very difficult torture scenes, but the "torture" amounts to a few strokes of a whip. If you're afraid to read this because of the references to torture, don't worry. On the other hand, if you're looking for torture scenes, you won't be happy with this.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Story with a Creative Spin 21 July 2012
By K. L. Evans - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I found this to be an excellent & very intriguing story.
I could not wait to see what the next encounter between the main 2 characters would bring, which I think denotes very good writing. I found I was interested in not only the main 2 characters but also the supporting cast. The story has a creative spin on the usual medieval torture scenario--- those who are squeamish about gruesome descriptions of physical torture need not shy from this story.
I liked how the purpose & goal of The Eternal Dungeon perfectly slotted into the land's judicial system & how The Eternal Dungeon was managed by a very strict Code.
Very good interaction scenes of tension with a slow build up of clues to a crime darker than the crime for which the accused was placed in The Eternal Dungeon. A nice contrast were the tender scenes between the accused & one of his guards, very subtle & very touching.
Some might find a few details and resolutions a trifle pat and/or convenient but I didn't. I thoroughly enjoyed this story & hope there will be others from the history of The Eternal Dungeon.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the most creative writings...what an imagination... 18 Dec 2012
By Kindle Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Don't stop at this short story...you won't "get it" if you do...this is a wonderful short excerpt from the full text, but get the entire Eternal Dungeon book and read it from cover to cover. No matter if you find one story boring or "too much", keep on going. It all pulls together in a way that is ingenious in the way it is laid out to the end from character development to theme. This is a very creative and most imaginative writing. The author takes one of the most difficult subjects, and makes it explode with excitement, intrigue and takes you thru thought provoking events on every page of the writing. Do not miss this especially if you have any interest in psychology and the history of...I promise you never thought of it like this.
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