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The Bonehunters: A Tale of the Malazan Book of the Fallen Paperback – 18 Sep 2007

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Product details

  • Paperback: 800 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books (18 Sept. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765316528
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765316523
  • Product Dimensions: 15.5 x 5.3 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (53 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,104,032 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Archaeologist and anthropologist Steven Erikson's debut novel, Gardens of the Moon, was shortlisted for the World Fantasy Award and set readers on the epic adventure that is his acclaimed 'The Malazan Book of the Fallen' sequence. He lives in Cornwall and is currently writing The Crippled God - the tenth and final chapter in what has been hailed 'a masterwork of the imagination'. To find out more, visit www.malazanempire.com.

Product Description

Review

"This is true myth in the making, a drawing upon fantasy to recreate histories and legends as rich as any found within our culture."--"Interzone ""Gripping, fast-moving, delightfully dark ... Erikson brings a punchy, mesmerizing writing style into the genre of epic fantasy, making an indelible impression. Utterly engrossing." --"Elizabeth Haydon" "From the Paperback edition." --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

The sixth book in Steven Erikson's epic Malazan Book of the Fallen fantasy sequence. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By GanoesParan on 18 Jun. 2006
Format: Paperback
Steven Erikson is the first fantasy writer that, after six installments, seems to be able to escape the pitfall into which numerous others (i.e. and foremost Robert Jordan) have fallen. This is probably due to the fact that he knows where his story is leading and that he does not write anything that substracts from the plot and from the prose needed to unfurl his so intricately woven world, which by the way is one of the most epic and large-scaled fantasy worlds up-to-date, barring perhaps Tolkien's Middle-Earth.
The Bonehunters, now , is a perfect example of two of the best traits Erikson, as a writer, has in store for us. Namely dialogue and convergence. The dialogue is not only very natural it's also extremely witty and an excellent way to transfer meaning. Sarcasm, irony, wit, indeed every feeling ever conveyed, it's all in the dialogue. As for convergence, Erikson is a master of it; within each novel but what's more important, and what becomes especially clear in The Bonehunters, within the overall arc of the entire series. It's not for nothing that part 10 is called The Crippled God!
So is there nothing to remark upon? Well, yes there is, but that particular complaint might cease to exist when the entire series has come to an end and things that now seem to have the aura of a Deus Ex Machina might then be entirely self-explanatory (although the term 'self-explanatory' does not really befit the Malazan Book of the Fallen).
So from me nothing but praise for The Bonehunters and as we are returning to the continent of Lether in the next installment, I'll say "Roll on Reaper's Gale!"
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By R. S. Brar on 1 Nov. 2006
Format: Paperback
This is part 6 of a planned ten novel story by Stephen Erikson. I was tempted to wait until the final instalment to read these books again, but could not wait so picked up a copy. The story begins with the obligatory ominous beginning where an evil being is unleashed onto the land to commit evil acts.

Once again there are many stories which interlink with each other and the overall storyline.

After the defeat of Shaik, the remnants of the rebel army are being chased across the seven cities by the imperial army. They are lead by the infamous Leoman of the flails who decides to make a last stand at the city of Y'Ghatan. A city which has ominous history for the pursuing Malazan army.

The Malazan army is led by the ever distant Adjunct Tavore. The army are unsure of her motivations and her abrupt manner and closed emotions do nothing to assist this. She is untested in real battle and the murmurs about her allegiance grow in the lead up to the siege. Tavore is an intriguing character in that she is so guarded with her emotion and motives, any flashes of feeling are extremely interesting.

The siege itself is described in detail as both sides take horrible losses. Savage clashes in the city as the Fourteenth try and take the city. Leoman's fanatical followers refuse to fall. Tavore watches on as Leoman's defence plan unfolds. Erikson description of battles, both with sword and sorcery, is easily as good as any other writer I have read. The siege is another fine example of this.

The army itself contains some old favourite characters such as Fiddler, Quick Ben and Kalam. The banter between some of the soldiers is extremely amusing, though never quite touching the comic heights of Midnight Tides.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By M. E. Parker on 10 April 2006
Format: Paperback
What places Erikson at the forefront of the fantasy genre to date, in my opinion, is not just the sheer scale of what he achieves in the most complex plot and character writing I have ever seen, but in the style with which he does it. I am surprised it has yet to be brought to light, but the poetic and philosphical quality with which Erikson infuses his narrative, is simply astounding. Never before have I seen it done with such skill. Simply, there is nothing more tedious than some obscure narrative voice abstractedly droning on about the state of human nature or moral integrity - but what is beautiful with this entire series is the way Erikson employs each character as an entirely unique voice on many enlightening perspectives - many of which contradict themselves as various characters meet certain revelations. The point being is that in doing so Erikson achieves a profound insight into real thought patterns that are affected by the maelstrom of events taking place in the plot - which, as everyone else has asserted, is verging on the incomprehensible, in its quality of craft and scope.
I am intrigued to read some minor criticisms, which I would flatly refute. Yes, 'The Bonehunters' is a transitionary book - but it is also the most pivotal point in the entire series, and as such, the best written. Why? Without giving any plot away, how Erikson interweaves and conjoins disparate plot lines is indicative of immense skill. The Edur's entrance into the Malazan world is not random as the Midnight Tides ends, hinged onto the expansionist intent of the Emperor of Lether - it is one of the many plot lines that I could see coming a mile off. The book also clearly has a plot of its own which is blatantly pointed out in the title (among further sub-plots added to the foray).
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