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The Blue Angel Unknown Binding – 1945

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Unknown Binding, 1945
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Product details

  • Unknown Binding
  • ASIN: B0014M9WWK
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 6,004,188 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sporus on 2 Mar. 2010
Format: Unknown Binding Verified Purchase
I always meant to read The Blue Angel, having ploughed my way through the works of Heinrich Mann's younger brother, Thomas. While the latter is waywardly intellectual and portentous (suits me!) I'd heard that Heinrich was quite at odds with his brother's approach. So it was curiosity about fraternal dissonance that made me dig out an old copy of his most famous novel (aka 'Professor Unrat') - rather than the celebrated film which launched Marlene Dietrich's career. It tells the story of a classics teacher (Mutt) in a small German town whose paranoia about being mocked by his pupils leads him to ruin his life; but not before his actions reveal the hypocrisy of the townsfolk. It remains a potent satire on any society that ostensibly praises 'high learning' while privately succumbing to low yearnings - potent because (as still happens) it does not piously side with the idea that "only literature and friendship are true". Presumably a daring book in its time, it has dated. The focus on the German class system and on the educational system (it put me in mind of Musil's 'Young Torless') perhaps explain why it seldom enjoys contemporary reprints. It's an easy read, but you'd probably need an 'extra' reason for picking it up (an interest in the times, in satire, or in the Mann family, say). Mann himself had a difficult - seemingly noble - life and it would have been nice to suggest it had a stronger appeal; but the resolution lacks a dramatic satisfaction.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By bernie TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 22 Sept. 2008
Format: Paperback
Many a time I needed someone to tell me when my shoe was untied, or many other obvious things in front of my face that I just do not notice. Well it is the same will films; you get so absorbed in the main message or the dialog and miss many subtle currents that are woven into the film. At other time you are not sure what the characters are saying or thinking as you would in a book. This (Lorrimer Publishing, London) series of film scripts and fill in those missing items and then some.

Until the advent of multi DVD versions with voice over narration there was no efficient way to enjoy what the film did not overtly say. Also the dialog was difficult to go back to. Yet even with this advantage there is still something more tactile about having a book.

This book contains many stills from the film to allow you to take the time to see what is really happening. The Pictures can also be looked at as souvenirs. There is an excellent introduction by Josef Von Sternberg himself. There are stage directions and explanations of how the dialog is to be presented.

Now sit back read and enjoy (or at least get engrossed).

Lola "singing": Men Cluster to me
Like moths around a flame
And if their wings burn
I know I'm not to blame

The pictures on Page (88) tell it all.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By bernie TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 22 Jun. 2005
Format: Paperback
This is one of about 42 Screenplays in a series. The book is full of stills. The dialog and motion I n script form. There is an introduction by Josef Von Sternberg. The movie stands on its own. However they use expressions to tell you what is in black and white in this book. The English and German versions were made separately (not dubbed)
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By bernie TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 22 July 2006
Format: Paperback
This is one of about 42 Screenplays in a series. The book is full of monochrome stills in clusters. The dialog and motion is in script form. There is an introduction by Josef Von Sternberg. The movie stands on its own; however many times the movie uses camera zooms and facial expressions to imply more to the story than just the dialog. You have to be very astute to get their inferences. In the film script book there is no doubt as it is in black and white with titles. The English and German versions of the film were made separately (not dubbed)
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