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The Betrayal of Trust: Simon Serrailler Book 6 (Simon Serrailler 6) Hardcover – 6 Oct 2011


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Chatto & Windus; 1st edition (6 Oct 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0701180013
  • ISBN-13: 978-0701180010
  • Product Dimensions: 16.1 x 3.2 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (145 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 246,073 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Susan Hill is a prize-winning novelist, having been awarded the Whitbread, Somerset Maugham and John Llewelyn Rhys awards, as well as having been shortlisted for the Booker Prize. She wrote Mrs de Winter, the bestselling sequel to Rebecca, and the ghost story The Woman in Black, which was adapted for the stage and became a great success in the West End. Her books include a collection of exquisite short stories, The Boy Who Taught the Beekeeper to Read, and the highly successful crime novel series about the detective Simon Serrailler. Susan Hill lives in Gloucestershire, where she runs her own small publishing firm, Long Barn Books.

Product Description

Review

"Hugely enjoyable... This is a satisfying crime story and a fearless examination of controversial issues surrounding terminal illness" (Carla McKay Daily Mail)

"The Betrayal of Trust isn't only a page-turner - though it certainly fulfils that expectation - it's also a thought-provoking novel about those who suffer and those who care for them." (Laura Wilson Guardian)

"A crime series that specialises in sidestepping conventions, always to exhilarating effect ... These books succeed in harnessing all the genre's addictive power while maintaining a complexity and fascination entirely their own." (Independent)

"It is when Hill descends to write about mere mortals...that one remembers she is among our finest novelists." (Daily Telegraph)

"Hill can't write a bad sentence and her characters are all completely convincing - none more so than her long-serving detective Simon Serrailler." (Henry Sutton Mirror)

Book Description

A cold case comes back to life in this sixth book in the highly successful Simon Serrailler detective series 'eagerly awaited by all aficionados' (P.D. James)

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By MistyMoo on 9 Oct 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have never been disappointed by Susan Hill's novels, and always recommend them to family and friends.

However, this novel appeared to "run out of steam", and I felt the ending was rushed. I do not want to spoil this for other readers, and although I am sure the ending was legally researched, having got to "know" Simon Serrailler over the course of this series, I felt he would have dealt with the outcome in a different way??

Having said that, it is a good read and there are lots of issues remaining, which I look forward to being picked up in the next novel.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mrs.S.A. Edwards on 9 Oct 2013
Format: Paperback
I have just this minute finished this novel - hadn't read any reviews and had just picked it out in Waterstones having read a couple of others in the series and fancying a satisfying, lighter read to follow a long, literary novel. Satisfying it was not; the plot was implausibly weighted with terminal illness and end of life issues of every kind in every direction. The ending was simply atrocious leaving all the plot lines unresolved bar one and that one was of the 'and then I woke up' level of sophistication. I am left feeling cheated and cross. Author or editor made some poor decisions here and I am left wondering how and why. It smacks of haste. Or did they publish an earlier draft in error? Is it actually a work in progress?
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By anniew on 26 Jan 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I found this book was mostly about caring for those with long term illness and euthanasia, and the ending was terrible, with Serrailler not even intending to report the murderer for the crime. I think he is one of the most badly drawn detectives ever, which is disappointing because Susan Hill is a great writer but to be honest Cat and Simon are just one dimensional. And what is the point of them having a third triplet, Ivo, who makes no appearances whatsoever. The father, Richard, could be an interesting character but is taken nowhere, and killing off Chris meant absolutely nothing. Lazy writing for money in my opinion and disappointing.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Brit back from Canada on 24 April 2013
Format: Paperback
Oh dear, I've followed Susan Hill's Serrailler detective novels since the first excellent 'The Various Haunts of Men' and usually enjoyed them, but I think this one probably marks the end of the line. Hill's writing always has a deeply moralistic tone, her subject matter is generally depressing to say the least and there is no humour, but the well structured plots and interesting main characters have always been enough to keep me reading. In this novel we are bombarded with anti-euthanasia propaganda that overshadows everything else and the plot suffers deeply as a result. The police investigation seems almost incidental to the overriding medical and moral issues raised and Serrailler's new love interest is already paving the way for more doom and gloom. The ending of the book is unsatisfying with lots of loose ends which will no doubt be picked up again in the next installment, though I'm afraid I won't be bothering to find out.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By T. E. H on 11 Feb 2013
Format: Paperback
This wasn't as good as I have come to expect from Susan Hill. The ending was rushed leaving the reader expecting another chapter. Maybe I just found murder, dementia, euthanasia and threatened hospice closure one too many depressing subjects for a novel! Hopefully this author might write something more uplifting in the near future. This series seems to touch every tragic circumstance that could happen to a family.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By The Cosmic Whelk on 29 Jan 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
i'd liked the other Serrailler novels so much - and i was thoroughly getting into this one and enjoying it, when... it suddenly came to an end! there were so many loose ends left hanging i don't know where to begin - in fact i won't even try, because i don't want to spoil this book for anyone.
most of it was great, but i felt it could have run to at least four more chapters. what a great shame, because this book was really shaping up to be first rate: attempting the difficult issue of assisted suicide, for instance, with what felt like a (fairly) open mind. i think if Susan Hill were not such a respected novelist - indeed, if this was a first book by an unknown writer - her editor would have pressured her to resolve all the threads thoroughly at the end, and not dump everything in an inconclusive heap.
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27 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Michael Finn on 24 Jan 2012
Format: Hardcover
The sixth book from Susan Hill to feature the inhabitants of Lafferton. The two main characters are siblings Dr Cat Deerbon and top cop DCS Simon Serrailler. The plots and themes explored usually feature the family's ongoing story and topics and situations thrown up by the pair's respective professions; health or lack of it, crime in society - all sensitively addressed in Hill's brilliant prose and her thoughtful insights into human emotions. Crime fiction? Well yeah, but not really comparable to much of the genre's staples and conventions.
In this one flooding in Lafferton has unearthed the bones of a young girl missing for 16 years, a mystery from the past that caused a big splash on the national consciousness. But alongside them are the bones of another young woman whose disappearance contrastingly caused not even a ripple. Serrailler is tasked with the cold case but is hampered by severe budget restrictions and he's just met the love of his life. Cat Deerbon deals with financial problems directing the local hospice, calling on the expertise of a newcomer to the town who is setting up a new care home for Alzheimer sufferers. In her general surgery she is consulted by a woman called Jocelyn with the early symptoms of Motor Neurone Disease, which leads to the thorny subject of assisted suicide. I think Hill tackles the subject as objectively as possible, though of course her characters are more swept along with the emotions of the terrible choices they face. Age, mortality, memory, lives lived and lives cut short, all played out in the setting of a Cathedral town and tied together with the lines of synchronicity within a cold case murder inquiry. I would add the advisory that this one is probably going to have more resonance with older readers or folk who have had their lives touched by terminal illness.
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