The Best Of Fats Domino
 
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The Best Of Fats Domino

23 Feb 2004

11.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
  Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
Blueberry Hill (2002 Digital Remaster)
2:23
2
Ain't That A Shame? (2002 Digital Remaster)
2:30
3
I'm Walkin' (2002 Digital Remaster)
2:08
4
Jambalaya (On The Bayou) (2002 Digital Remaster)
2:23
5
I'm In Love Again (2002 Digital Remaster)
1:56
6
Blue Monday (2002 Digital Remaster)
2:19
7
The Fat Man (2002 - Remaster)
2:36
8
Be My Guest (2002 Digital Remaster)
2:16
9
The Big Beat (2002 Digital Remaster)
1:58
10
What A Party (2002 Digital Remaster)
1:53
11
I'm Ready (2002 Digital Remaster)
2:05
12
Sick And Tired (2002 Digital Remaster)
2:33
13
Poor Me (2002 Digital Remaster)
2:20
14
My Girl Josephine (Aka Hello Josephine) (2001 Digital Remaster)
2:06
15
I Want To Walk You Home (2002 Digital Remaster)
2:20
16
Margie (2002 Digital Remaster)
2:17
17
Country Boy (2002 Digital Remaster)
2:15
18
I'm Gonna Be A Wheel Someday (2002 Digital Remaster)
2:02
19
Let The Four Winds Blow (2002 Digital Remaster)
2:19
20
Whole Lotta Loving (2002 Digital Remaster)
1:39
21
Please Don't Leave Me (2002 Digital Remaster)
2:38
22
Goin' Home (2002 Digital Remaster)
2:11
23
Walking To New Orleans (2002 Digital Remaster)
2:01
24
Going To The River (2002 Digital Remaster)
2:35
25
When My Dreamboat Comes Home (2002 Digital Remaster)
2:18
26
Wait And See (2002 Digital Remaster)
1:58
27
It Keeps Rainin' (2002 Digital Remaster)
2:47
28
My Blue Heaven (2002 Digital Remaster)
2:08
29
I Hear You Knocking (2002 Digital Remaster)
1:52
30
Valley Of Tears (2002 Digital Remaster)
1:51


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 23 Feb 2004
  • Release Date: 23 Feb 2004
  • Label: Capitol Catalog
  • Copyright: (C) 2004 EMI Records Ltd This label copy information is the subject of copyright protection. All rights reserved. (C) 2004 EMI Records Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:06:37
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001IXZ1C0
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 41,113 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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4.9 out of 5 stars
4.9 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb R & R Memories 16 Sep 2007
By AD
Format:Audio CD
For anyone like myself who was a young record buyer in the 1950's, this CD is a great trip down Memory Lane, and the music stands up very well after all these years.

Antoine "Fats" Domino (b. 1928, New Orleans) emerged in the mid 1950s from the strictly African-American R & B scene ("The Fat Man" was recorded as early as 1949) to "cross over" onto the mainstream Pop charts. He had a great run of singles successes on both sides of the Atlantic, with "Blueberry Hill", "Ain't That A Shame", "Whole Lotta Lovin'" and others, all covered on this CD.

Just what did he have that others didn't? Well, he projected a relaxed, easy-going image and really looked as if he was enjoying making music, and his rich New Orleans accent kind of added extra charm and appeal. His piano work wasn't frantic like Little Richard or Jerry Lee Lewis, but had a full, bluesy sound, which was well complemented by the brass section that was usually part of the set-up. His up-tempo numbers like "I'm Walkin'" were tailor-made for the dancers, and he was very much in the right place at the right time when Rock 'N' Roll hit the airwaves and the record stores in the mid-to late 1950's. His happy-go-lucky style transferred very well to the cinema screen and he landed spots in the major R'N'R films at this time.

Like many other American acts, the advent of The Beatles and the British Invasion spelled the end of his big success on records, but he continued touring and making a good living in the music business. He was co-writer on many of his hits, so this was good insurance for him.

He remained based in New Orleans, and as the years went by toured less and less, claiming the food wasn't any good anywhere else!
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rock'n'roll music from New Orleans 9 Mar 2005
By Peter Durward Harris #1 HALL OF FAME TOP 10 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
Like Memphis, New Orleans is a cultural melting pot, where you can find many different styles of music. Fats was already a successful recording artist long before the birth of rock'n'roll - he sold a million copies of The fat man in 1949 - but rock'n'roll gave his career a boost.
This compilation includes The fat man and two other pre-rock'n'roll successes (Going home, Going to the river) but mostly focuses on Fats' music between 1956 and 1962. Many of these songs are originals but the song for Fats is most famous, Blueberry hill, is actually a cover. Glen Miller had the original American hit with Blueberry hill, taking in to number one in 1940, but Fats was apparently inspired by Louis Armstrong's cover of the song. Blueberry hill was the only UK top ten hit for Fats although he had nine other UK top twenty hits. He did better in America, where he had many more major hits.
Among the other tracks here, one of the most significant is Be my guest, which, more than any other track here, shows why Fats was an influence on Jamaican reggae music. I hear you knocking, originally a Smiley Lewis song, will be familiar to many Brits because of the version by Dave Edmunds that topped the UK charts in 1971.
Many other classic Fats Domino hits are here including Ain't that a shame, I'm walking, Jambalaya, I'm in love again, Blue Monday, I want to walk you home and Walking to New Orleans.
If you just want a single CD of Fats Domino's rock'n'roll music, this is as good as you are likely to find.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tremendous 20 Mar 2001
Format:Audio CD
Being a young fan of Rock and Roll, I was only really aware of Blueberry Hill from the Fat man, but having bought this, I realise not only how much of a showman he is, but his varying talents. The Fat Man, the song, has a tremendous piano solo, and his unmistakeable voice make this a must buy for all Rock and Roll fans. Simply Superb
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of New Orleans' More Engaging Exports 7 Jun 2012
By Stephanie De Pue TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
"My Blue Heaven - The Best of Fats Domino," EMI Imperial, 1990, is a good, thorough compilation of all the 1950's hits, on Imperial, that made the piano-playing Domino famous. And a few more seminal bits and pieces, too: the Cd's got 20 cuts in all. It's also a solid illustration of what makes Domino one of New Orleans' (his home town's), most engaging, entertaining exports.

The cuts included here, like all Domino's work for Imperial, were produced by his close, long-term friend Dave Bartholomew, and what a stroke of luck that proved for the musician. Domino and Bartholomew also wrote many of the biggest hits together: I expect those royalties have added up to quite a mountain of Carnival gewgaws over the years. Seems like Domino got in on the ground floor, when Bartholomew and Lew Chudd, owner of Imperial, joined forces, and went looking for exciting new acts around the Big Easy. They found the barely twenty year old Domino playing a local club, utilizing a half-forgotten old-style of pianism, what they called locally jailhouse blues. Nobody else was doing it - Bartholomew and Chudd were blown away. The trio cut their first single, "The Fat Man," in 1950, and, for several years thereafter, Domino's work languished in rhythm and blues. But times were changing, and Domino crossed over into rock and roll with "Ain't It A Shame," in 1955. If you were around at the time, you'll know that the white singer Pat Boone quickly covered it, as "Ain't That a Shame," and had a pretty big hit with it, too. But Domino and Bartholomew were getting the royalties, even so, and were able to cry all the way to the bank.

Many more hits followed, several of them covered by white performers at the time. But the hits live to this day, alive on the radio and in our hearts, in Domino's smooth stylings.
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