• RRP: £10.99
  • You Save: £2.20 (20%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Berlin Wall: 13 Augus... has been added to your Basket
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book is in nice condition, clean with no missing pages and minimal markings. The pages may be slightly dog eared but overall in great shape. It is fulfilled by Amazon which means it is eligible for Amazon Prime and Super Saver Shipping.
Trade in your item
Get a £0.34
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Berlin Wall: 13 August 1961 - 9 November 1989 Paperback – 2 Nov 2009

12 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, 2 Nov 2009
"Please retry"
£8.79
£4.34 £4.30
£8.79 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Berlin Wall: 13 August 1961 - 9 November 1989 + Stasiland: Stories from Behind the Berlin Wall
Price For Both: £16.28

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £0.34
Trade in The Berlin Wall: 13 August 1961 - 9 November 1989 for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.34, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 528 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC (2 Nov. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1408802562
  • ISBN-13: 978-1408802564
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 3.2 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 71,927 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

PRAISE FOR 'DRESDEN' 'In narrative power and persuasion, he has paralleled in Dresden what Antony Beevor achieved in Stalingrad' Independent on Sunday 'Well-researched and unpretentious fascinating Taylor skilfully interweaves various personal accounts of the impact of the raids' Michael Burleigh, Guardian 'Impressive Taylor weaves a chilling narrative from eyewitness accounts and painstaking documentary research, particularly with German sources. He explains the conceptual and strategic background with admirable clarity. His account of the air operation itself is quite superb' The Times

About the Author

Frederick Taylor was educated at Aylesbury Grammar School, and read History and Modern Languages at Oxford, and did postgraduate work at Sussex University. He is the author of the acclaimed bestseller, Dresden. He edited and translated The Goebbels Diaries. He lives in Cornwall.

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Mr. D Burin on 25 Aug. 2010
Verified Purchase
Written in a similar vein to his earlier 'Dresden', Frederick Taylor's most recent work, 'The Berlin Wall' is a lively, well-researched and readable chronicle of the Cold War's most recognisable and chilling symbol. Beginning with a contextual preamble which briefly, but informatively describes events such as the development of the marshy settlement of Berlin, through to the formation of the Weimar Republic, and beyond that, the political and social climate of post WWI Germany, Taylor's book gives the reader a good background of knowledge on the foundations of Germany which have led the way to the disastrous WWII, and the realities of East and West Germany.

Equally, the bulk of the book, which deals in depth with both the Wall itself, as well as the wider contexts of life in East and West Germany is superb. Taylor's wealth of information regarding the strengthening of borders with everything from armed troops and extra, climbing proof wire in Berlin, to road devices in the more secluded areas of the GDR, is extremely impressive; as are his tales of individual successes and failures to cross the border, which show both the power of the Wall to prevent desertion, and the will of many East Germans to escape to the West. Taylor's critically sound and impartial assessments on more general issues such as the American government's struggles to decide on a correct policy for West Germany, and the hands-off approach from the British and French Governments regarding Berlin, add an extra depth to the work.

There are, however, some flaws in the text.
Read more ›
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By skywatcher on 29 Dec. 2011
I have enjoyed Mr Taylor's book a great deal - it evokes the post-war period powerfully, and drives home the point that the Second World War only truly ended with the reunification of first Berlin and then Germany. It does a good job of explaining the quite complex nature of occupied Berlin, its place within the Soviet occupation zone, and the relationships both among the occupying powers and between them and the nascent East German government. Who was permitted to travel between West Germany, West Berlin, East Berlin, East Germany and beyond, and with what conditions, was also a complex (and frequently changing) matter which the author tracks in commendable detail.

Passages such as those covering the historical background of Berlin, the Wandlitz compound, the 1961 tank stand-off, the often difficult political relationship between West Berlin and Bonn, Kennedy's relations with Brandt and Ulbricht's with Khrushchev, are particularly fascinating. Other sections - e.g. Honecker's visit to the Saarland in 1987, and comments such as the fact that "The Wall" as it features in the western consciousness was virtually never seen by any East Berliners - are particularly insightful.

As others have pointed out, though, there are some flaws. The book properly focuses most heavily on the 1950s and 1960s. However, I feel that the discussion of the 1970s and 1980s - in many ways an equally interesting period - is a little short. There seems to be relatively little attention paid to Honecker the man and his succession of Ulbricht. I feel more coverage of the media available in the GDR - particularly broadcast - would have added considerably to the book.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By SL-N/1973 on 12 Nov. 2011
Verified Purchase
This is very well researched and enthusiastically written, and the chapters flew by. It contains a huge barrage of political players, ordinary people, key dates, facts and incredible events all of which are presented in a flowing, intelligent and lively manner which kept me reading and reading and reading....

If you have even a passing interest in why the wall existed and why it had to come down, please start with this. It covers the decades leading up to its creation in 1961, casts a broad net across European, American and Soviet relationships, shows all the deceit and dishonesty of the house-of-cards communist regimes along with cash-strapped dilemmas and misjudgements of the west - all of which come to life with not only the gift of hindsight and interviews with all kinds of people, but also the opening of the Stasi files after 1989.

One thing which would have made this book even better would have been a few more photographs. There's a few b&w ones, but there's such a lot of people are mentioned, and it would be nice to put faces to those names. But that's just a tiny point to make and does not detract from what is a fine piece of work!

It's a great book, and I would recommend it to anyone - especially those who, like me, remember the wall coming down but have never known the story behind it. It's an amazing tale!
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By alocket on 10 May 2013
Verified Purchase
This is a very comprehensive (some might say exhaustive) account of how the Berlin Wall came into being going right back to the early history of Berlin and there is no doubt much of it is fascinating and it is all well-researched. However, after such a great build-up, the fall of the Wall is dealt with far too quickly and the whole book suffers from not including a single map of Berlin, meaning there is no context for any reference to street names, districts etc. I also felt that the text was sometimes let down by 'throwaway' opinions or remarks that were out of keeping with the bulk of the text which was based in solid academic research.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback