Or
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.

More Options
The Band
 
See larger image
 

The Band

17 Aug. 2000 | Format: MP3

£5.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £5.53 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
Provided by Amazon EU Sąrl. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations. Complete your purchase of the CD album to save the MP3 version to your Amazon music library.
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
2:53
30
2
3:04
30
3
3:33
30
4
3:13
30
5
4:34
30
6
3:58
30
7
3:31
30
8
3:43
30
9
3:09
30
10
4:20
30
11
4:16
30
12
3:39
30
13
2:17
30
14
3:04
30
15
4:16
30
16
4:54
30
17
5:06
30
18
3:48
30
19
4:28
Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.co.uk (UK).
  

Product details

  • Original Release Date: 17 Aug. 2000
  • Release Date: 17 Aug. 2000
  • Label: Capitol Catalog
  • Copyright: (C) 2000 Capitol Records, Inc.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:11:46
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001J8A9V2
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (62 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 16,168 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Stuart Robert Harris VINE VOICE on 21 Feb. 2001
Format: Audio CD
I doubt that any single album has so many great songs played so well. I've come back to this album time and again over the last XX years and it's never disappointed me.
At a time when most popular music was permutating the basic guitar-bass-drums line-up, The Band were blending those instruments with reeds, horns and keyboards. Using a tuba as the bass on Rag Mama Rag, no less The sound is simultaneously rough yet sophisticated. The singing blends sweetness and hard edge. Rural but definitely not country.
For music lovers born in the 50s and 60s (and maybe earlier) this album is an absolute sure-fire must-have. For those born later, I wonder whether it sounds as compelling - years of multi-track recording and studio wizardry have raised the taste for smoothness so this one might be a tad too grainy for them.
The version I have is the unremastered CD. I wonder about the additional tracks on this one - more can sometimes diminish the perfect integrity of a great album. If record companies want to give the fans a little extra, bless them, then I personally would prefer them on a 2nd CD. Like an appendix.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
38 of 39 people found the following review helpful By "jack_lennon" on 29 Dec. 2003
Format: Audio CD
This album was brought to my attention by my Dylan ridden parents a few years ago. We don't call it the 'Brown Album' in our house, nor the Greatest Hits of The Band, we just refer to it simply as 'The Band' cause that is what it is in its most simplest, the music that symbolises the Band. Not only does each track release something different into the musical soul, but the artwork and story inside is very enjoyable. WHEN you buy it, if you haven't already, please look at the photos - at first glance, some bearded guys looking like tramps in a shabby old hut, but at a closer glance, you can see the 'coolness' of this great selection of musicians.
Each Band member with a different characteristic. Robbertson, the clever guitarist, expressive in the lyrics of many of the songs (one thing that comes to mind is the Last Waltz where he and Clapton on playing 'Further On Up The Road' and the enjoyment in both their eyes.) The dry, awakening sound of Levon Helm's voice, emphasising each point from the thought provoking lyrics, 'Up On Cripple Creek and Look Out Cleveland' my two faves from the album. The bass guitar and harmonies provided by Danko, not to mention those piercing black eyes boaring into your musical mind, especially on 'The Unfaithful Servant.' The hard hitting piano solos from Manuel that live on in 'Jawbone.' And last but by no means least, Garth Hudson, on the fancy organ, clavinette, accordion, slide trumpet and any others you can think of.
As you can probably guess, this album is in prime position in the top slots of my CD collection.
For those who haven't got this, I urhe you to buy it, for those who HAVE, then I demand you to listen to it...NOW!
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By S J Buck TOP 500 REVIEWER on 2 July 2006
Format: Audio CD
With 3 Lead vocalists, that played more than half a dozen instruments between them. A lead guitarist and songwriter of the highest quality, and a multi-intrumentalist/keyboard player The Band were, and still remain quite unique to this day.

This album still sounds completely original now. In 1969 it would have been from another planet. Everybody was into acid and anti-establishment, Flower Power, Hendrix psychedelia were hip then. The Band went backwards and embraced a bit of country, Ragtime, Gospel and Rock N Roll of course.

Highlights - well the only only minor hit single they ever had "Rag Mama Rag" is a track that demonstrates their versitilty. Rick Danko (the usual bass player) is playing fiddle, theres some fiendish Piano Playing from Garth Hudson and virtually everybody is playing something different from usual.

The other well known track is The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down (which sounds as though it was written in the 19th Century). This was covered by Joan Baez. However, my favourite is probably King Harvest (has Surely Come). Richard Manuels lead vocal is anguished, Robbies guitar solo, brilliant but understated. If you've seen the classic albums program on this album you'll understand.

Believe it or not this album influenced Eric Clapton and Elton John. Hard to believe. When Clapton first heard this record he stopped wanting to be a guitar hero and wanted to get back to writing quality songs. Listen to Elton Johns Tumbleweed Connection album and it reeks of the first two Band records (and its a great album in its own right).

Sadly Richard Manuel committed suicide in 1986, and Rick Danko died in the 1990's. We will never see The Band perform again in its original line-up and to me this is as sad as The Beatles never performing again after the famous roof-top concert. Thats how good these guys were. This album remains an essential purchase 37 years after it was released.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By J. Skade VINE VOICE on 31 Dec. 2002
Format: Audio CD
The Band were five hot bar musicians who'd taken loud raucous r'n'b to perfection whilst backing Bob Dylan in the mid 60's. After Dylan's crash (literal or otherwise) they retired to Woodstock where they dicovered fresh air, household chores and history. The began to play music at a lower volume, with a sense of camaraderie and sheer joy that has been unequalled since. This is their second and best album. The most noticeable and most often noted aspect of the album is its timeless quality. These songs, mostly by Robbie Robertson, sound like a bunch of rediscovered folk songs celebrating a long vanished America. They have a resonance missing from most rock'n'roll and a quality which is rare indeed.
The finest of the Band's three main vocalists, Richard Manuel, his voice rich and warm as good brandy, tops and tails this album with the uptempo comedy of 'Across the Great Divide' and the agonised brilliance of 'King Harvest (Has Surely Come)' about a poor farmer. He is also at the heart of this album with the heartbreakingly beautiful 'Whispering Pines'.
Levon, drummer and sometime mandolin player has a much earthier voice and he delights us with the bawdy nonsense of 'Rag Mama Rag','Up On Cripple Creek' and the tragic tale of Southern defeat 'The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down'. This song is probably the key note of the album and is as moving as pop music can be.
There is so much more on this album - not least Rick Danko's 'Unfaithful Servant'- and the playing is little short of miraculous, skilled, unselfish and rivetting. Perhaps in this field it is Garth Hudson who most earns the plaudits he is everywhere, governing the musical tone of each song. Perfect.
As for bonus tracks - they are good and it is nice to hear the studio version of 'Get Up Jake' but they cannot improve on perfection and I usually turn the cd off after 'King Harvest'
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category