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The Ballad of Sir Dinadan (Squire's Tales) [Paperback]

Gerald Morris
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

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Product details

  • Paperback: 232 pages
  • Publisher: Kingfisher Books Ltd (15 May 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0753413388
  • ISBN-13: 978-0753413388
  • Product Dimensions: 19.4 x 12.8 x 2.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 744,775 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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First Sentence
"I call upon the muse of song Or epic, like as not, To tell a tale, but not too long, Before it be forgot. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best book ever, in the world ever 13 Sep 2010
A Kid's Review
Format:Paperback
This is the best book I've ever read. Because even from the first paragraph, the book is already interesting. You can say this for all of the Squire's Tales books, and Gerald Morris is my favourite author. This book is about the youngest son of a Lord. Dinadan wants to be a musican, but his father is ashamed and wants him to be a knight, so knights him and hopes he will live up to his name, which he does eventually as he goes to Camelot and goes questing with Sir Kai and Sir Bedevere. He eventually finds his brother Sir Tristram but doesn't reval his name until nearly the end of the book.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The ballad of Sir Dumbledin 17 May 2010
By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAME TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
A heroic knight falls in love with the married queen, incurring the wrath of the king. Arthur, Guinevere and Lancelot? No, it's a slightly different Arthurian tale, and one that mainly focuses on the musically-inclined Sir Dinadin, who never wanted to be a knight anyway.

Dinadin has always wanted to be a minstrel (especially since his older brother Tristam is a valiant knight), but his father knights him in a drunken stupor and sends him off. Dinadin joins up with a rather dim Welsh knight, Culloch, and ends up at Arthur's court of Camelot. Then he goes off with Culloch, Kai and Bedivere to do knightly things -- including freeing a sharp-tongued lady-in-waiting called Brangienne and Culloch's attempts to win a rather unattractive princess.

Along the way, Dinadin learns that Brangienne is fleeing Queen Iseult, because she knows that Iseult is in love with Tristam, who is wandering around, having taken a vow of silence and unwilling to shut up about it. He also won't shut up about Iseult, with the result that everybody except her husband knows about them. Dinadin teams up with the noble Moor Palomides (who wants to learn what knights are), as the not-so-secret affair between Tristam and Iseult comes to a dramatic peak.

Morris takes a skip back in time for this book -- it takes place parallel to "The Squire, His Knight And His Lady" and "The Savage Damsel And the Dwarf," though the overlap is only about two paragraphs long. And he handles this story very well and very deftly -- Dinadin doesn't want to become a knight, and he doesn't really have conventional aptitude for it. He'd rather stay home and play his rebec. But his cleverness and ingenuity are what make him a good knight, above and beyond being able to whack things with a sword.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.6 out of 5 stars  17 reviews
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Ballad of Sir "Dumbledin" 29 Mar 2003
By E. A Solinas - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
A heroic knight falls in love with the married queen, incurring the wrath of the king. Arthur, Guinevere and Lancelot? No, it's a slightly different Arthurian tale, and one that mainly focuses on the musically-inclined Sir Dinadin, who never wanted to be a knight anyway.
Dinadin has always wanted to be a minstrel (especially since his older brother Tristam is a valiant knight), but his father knights him in a drunken stupor and sends him off. After dispatching the knight of a treacherous damsel, Dinadin joins up with a rather dim Welsh knight, Culloch, and ends up at Arthur's court of Camelot. Then he goes off with Culloch, Kai and Bedivere to do knightly things -- including freeing a sharp-tongued lady-in-waiting called Brangienne and Culloch's attempts to win a rather unattractive princess.
Along the way, Dinadin learns that Brangienne is fleeing Queen Iseult, because she knows that Iseult is in love with Tristam, who is wandering around, having taken a vow of silence and unwilling to shut up about it. He also won't shut up about Iseult, with the result that everybody except her husband knows about them. Dinadin teams up with the noble Moor Palomides (who wants to learn what knights are), as Brangienne's safety is jeopardized, and the not-so-secret affair between Tristam and Iseult comes to a dramatic peak.
Morris takes a skip back in time for this book -- it takes place parallel to "The Squire, His Knight And His Lady" and "The Savage Damsel And the Dwarf," though the overlap is only about two paragraphs long. And he handles this story very well and very deftly -- Dinadin doesn't want to become a knight, and he doesn't really have conventional aptitude for it. He'd rather stay home and play his rebec. But his cleverness and ingenuity are what make him a good knight, above and beyond being able to whack things with a sword.
Dinadin is as likable a hero as Morris has penned before, not your typical knight but a solid and admirable one instead. Palomides serves as a good foil, searching for the English ideal knight and finding it where he doesn't expect to; Brangienne is very like Eileen, very witty and smart. Iseult and Tristam are pretty pitiful, and I'm not just talking about the nauseatingly-named "Love Grotto." Tristam thinks he's nothing without a lady to serve, and Iseult is just... well, she's just a lisping ditz with a crazy husband.
As with all his books, there is plenty of humor in this story, ranging from horribly-written ballads to a magical drinking horn to the worst wedding ceremony in history. (Not to mention Kai repeating the ballad line: "Jug jug witta poo poo") It gets a bit more serious near the end, but overall it's much more lighthearted than Morris's fourth Arthurian tale, "Parsifal's Page."
Fans of Morris will definitely like "The Ballad of Sir Dinadin." (Or Sir Dumbledin... Dimbledum... Dinderlin... oh bugger it...) Giving a new twist on the tale of Iseult and Tristam, Morris lets the spotlight shine on the unlikely and capable Dinadin.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Ballad of Gerald Morris 1 April 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Although I didn't find this one as amusing as The Savage Damsel and the Dwarf (my personal favorite)The Ballad of Sir Dinaden is more comic fun from Gerald Morris. While some might find it too predictable, this book is charming in that while it might not be the most mysterious of books, it's certainly one of the more goof humored. Arthurian buffs will be especially excited to note Sir Lamorak's lady love. Yes, that is exactly who you think it is, at least, I hope so.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars We laughed, we cried, we fought over who got to read it first! 2 April 2007
By P. Wilson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
After reading one book by author Gerald Morris, we were addicted! Now my husband (43), my son (12), and myself (37) are fighting over every book in the Squire's Tales series that we can get our hands on! We bought this book because we heard it was "good literature." We had no idea HOW good until we read it. It is clever, witty, sarcastic, adventurous, and inspirational! My husband laughed so hard he cried! It is a very entertaining retelling of the King Arthur stories and Canterbury Tales, complete with knights, castles, princesses, magic, fairies, herbs with healing powers, and quests! The characters as sassy and full of spunk, and there is a new adventure around every corner. We recommended these books to our local library, some of the librarians read one of the books, and they ended up ordering a bunch of the books from The Squire's Tales series for the library. (This book is fifth in the in the series.) It is easy to recommend such a charming and entertaining book!
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Gerald Morris does it again! 4 July 2005
By Willow and Jasmine - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
I love all of Gerald Morris's books, but this is one of my favorites! Despite the title, it is a retelling of Tristan and Isolde. Now everyone knows that tragic love story -- but not this way!

The story is told from Dinadan's point of view. He is the younger brother of the famous Tristan, but doesn't really know his brother. After his drunken father knights him, Dinadan leaves to go adventuring. During his travels, he meets his brother (who doesn't remember him). He realizes that the famous Tristan is really a self-centered idiot. He also meets the beautiful cruel Isolde. Dinadan learns a few life lessons on his travels, and also meets a spunky young lady with a terrible secret, who turns out to be the former handmaiden of Isolde. The ending is wonderful and quite unexpected, and everyone gets what they deserve. Althought it doesn't stick to the actual tale, it's still great fun for everyone!
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Read 18 April 2014
By Mark Anton - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Short book manages to keep your attention with many laughs. This was my first read of The Squire's Tales and I plan on picking up several more of them.
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