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The Asti Spumante Code: A Parody Paperback – 14 Apr 2005


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Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Sphere; FIRST EDITION edition (14 April 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0751537683
  • ISBN-13: 978-0751537680
  • Product Dimensions: 10.9 x 2 x 14.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 692,595 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

Highly engaging, clever and a funny read (MAIL ON SUNDAY)

A hilarious book with a generous helping of sarcasm makes this a must-read. (THE SUN)

Book Description

Barry Trotter' did it for Rowling, 'Bored of the Rings' did it for Tolkien. 'Asti Spumante' will do it for Brown - in spades.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By S Donard on 12 July 2005
Format: Paperback
This is a very very funny and clever parody of the appalling Da Vinci Code. The author captures the style, or lack of it, of Dan Brown - the wooden dialogue, the tedious and long-winded explanations, the ludicrous logic and bizarre twists of the plot line and the same plethora of unnecessary descriptive detail.
The only problem is that you have first to read the awful Da Vinci Code to get full enjoyment of the Asti Spumante Code......
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Ali BaderEddin on 11 Aug. 2005
Format: Paperback
Toby Clements has done a great imitation, but still with his unlimited creativity: From "The Holy Grail", which is a collection of bones and papers, to "The Asti Spumante", which is a valuable book that will render other books meaningless; From France to Belgium; From museum to library; From Priory of Sion to Order of Priory; From Caeser Substitution Algorithm to Atbash Substitution Algorithm; From ... To ...;
The same exact style as the great author, Dan Brown.
Fleeing with the help of a condom was much more interesting than jumping over a truck!
Too many similarities with too many differences at the same time.. That was GREAT!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By dwein22 on 4 May 2005
Format: Paperback
This book is absolutely hilarious. Far, far better than "The Va Dinci Cod". If you enjoy parodies, this book is a must.
The plot is based loosely around "The Da Vinci Code" and therefore is a must read before reading this as a lot of the references will be meaningless otherwise. The characters are based well on the original and some of the more minor characters are covered.
By far the funniest thing in the entire book is the identity of the enemy and the reason they want the code.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By S. Jones VINE VOICE on 4 Jan. 2006
Format: Paperback
Parody of a novel is maybe more difficult to pull off than it might seem. Sustaining the knowing joke for more than a page or two without boring the reader can't be easy, and it's to the author's credit that he manges to do so for the most part. Thankfully, the parody is less than half the length of That Other Book.
Clements has captured the 'Style' of the original: the leaps in logic, the blindingly obvious puzzles, the chunks of irrelevant background detail, the total absence of anything resembling a believable character. All these and more are present and highly amusing. The first half of the book especially is crammed with moments which made me laugh out loud.
The worst of it is that reading the Asti Spumante Code has made me feel almost inclined to read TOB again to confirm how 'eerily' (to borrow one of the authors' favourite adverbs) Toby Clements has captured Brown's tone!
Oh no, not again....
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Craobh Rua VINE VOICE on 14 Aug. 2006
Format: Paperback
"The Asti Spumante Code" kicks off in Brussels, with the murder of Gordon Sanitaire - curator of the city's Grande Bibliothèque. He proves to be the latest victim of the hirsute Stoat - so called because his hair (or, more accurately, `fur') changes colour with the season. (For this reason, he travels on two passports : one for the summer, the other for the winter). Stoat is a member of the Uxbridge Road Group, the militant wing of the English Book Guild. The Guild was founded with the aim of encouraging people to read and, although the URG's methods are extreme, they have also proved effective. Under the instructions of Brown Owl, Stoat is searching for the legendary Mûre-de-Paume, some sort of keystone.

The investigation into Sanitaire's death is headed up by Capitaine Taureau, who very quickly manages to point the finger at the book's hero : James Crack. Not only the Professor of Para-Literal Meta-Symbologist Studies at the University of Catt-Butt in Nebraska, Crack also proves to be an clueless, egotistical bore.

For those of us who hated "The Da Vinci Code", this is the easiest way of getting any pleasure from it. Brown's writing style is mocked perfectly : the chapters are ridiculously short, while every opportunity is taken to labour over the most minute and irrelevant point. Certain things are stated as fact, when they're clearly anything but true. Crack himself makes wild jumps of logic and stumbles across clues by means of blind luck rather than any form of skill. Recommended for those who read "The Da Vinci Code" and hated it.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 15 April 2005
Format: Paperback
If you enjoyed the da vinci code, or even if you didn't, buy this book! It's fun and unputdownable, some bits are funny, some bits are thrilling, and some bits are just plain weird!
Why is there a stoat? A man with a american football shaped head? Why are the police so overzealous? And why can't the characters just get some sleep?
I read the book in 3 (ish) hours, i just devoured it, i couldn't wait to find out what happened next!
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