The Artist 2011

LOVEFiLM By Post

Britain’s largest choice of DVDs and Blu-rays to rent by post £7.99 per month.

Start your 30 day free trial

Prime and Prime Instant Video members can receive unlimited discs, two at a time, for £6.99 per month after trial.

(336) IMDb 8/10
LOVEFiLM By Post

Hollywood, 1927: As silent movie star George Valentin wonders if the arrival of talking pictures will cause him to fade into oblivion, he sparks with Peppy Miller, a young dancer set for a big break.

Starring:
John Goodman, Penelope Ann Miller
Rental Formats:
DVD, Blu-ray

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature parental_guidance
Runtime 1 hour 40 minutes
Starring John Goodman, Penelope Ann Miller, James Cromwell, Bérénice Bejo, Joel Murray, Jean Dujardin, Stuart Pankin, Beth Grant
Director Michel Hazanavicius
Genres Drama
Studio ENTERTAINMENT IN VIDEO
Rental release 28 May 2012
Main languages English
Discs
  • Feature parental_guidance
Runtime 1 hour 40 minutes
Starring John Goodman, Penelope Ann Miller, James Cromwell, Bérénice Bejo, Joel Murray, Jean Dujardin, Stuart Pankin, Beth Grant
Director Michel Hazanavicius
Genres Drama
Studio ENTERTAINMENT IN VIDEO
Rental release 28 May 2012
Main languages English

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By THE MOVIE GUY on 23 Jun. 2013
Format: DVD
This is a good movie, but it typically one that is overrated because it shows some kind of class, intellect and refinement to proclaim itself as genius. The production starts with 3 strikes against it. First, at times, it is a movie within a movie. Second, it is in black and white, and third, it is mostly all silent. With all the rave, I was willing to attempt an open mind viewing (zombie films are sometimes in black and white too).

These techniques were done to to give us the flavor of the films of the era. Even though those restored masters are available, who among the 5 star rave reviewers watch them? You could list them on one hand, or maybe one finger. In the silent era, the jokes were visual. The sound track created the mood, more so than it does today, and actors had to make dramatic movements to create emotions. They used their face...a term called "mugging" in the film. This was brilliantly brought out in the film, although we already knew that.

The film uses symbolism, such as when our star George Valentin's (Jean Dujardin)career is sinking, it shows him in a film sinking in quicksand. Good yes. Genius? Hardly. The script reminded me of "A Star is Born" (pick one) where a star launches the career of a new star only to see his fade. George is "The Artist" who believes talkies are not art. Besides the studio no longer wants George. They want fresh faces such as rising star Peppy Miller (Bérénice Bejo).

I liked the idea of doing the silent movie film to show us the transition from silent to talkies, I just didn't like the predictable script. Plot is important.

No f-bombs, sex, or nudity. You should be able to read lips after this film.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
53 of 59 people found the following review helpful By Mr. R. W. Graham VINE VOICE on 17 Jan. 2012
Format: Blu-ray
What's this? A French black and white silent film? In this day and age of overblown cgi and 3d effects? What were they thinking?!! Well as it turns out The Artist is a beautiful work of art that takes you back to the early days of cinema, and the days when silent cinema was starting to make way for the talkies. It's stunning to look at and very funny too with great performances as a silent movie star finds himself being upstaged then replaced by a new actress and then the talkies themselves which he refuses to do because he is an artist and feels that the audience does not need to hear him speak. This is also a very moving film and seeing it on the big screen must have been pretty close to what it was like for audiences in the 20's. And watch out for Uggie the dog who completely steals the film. This is quite simply one of the most charming and inoffensive films that you will ever see.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Victoria Jensen on 20 Jun. 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is a creative, charismatic, gorgeous film performed by talented actors.
Before watching it, it's a bit off-putting to imagine watching a film without dialogue, but you DO NOT MISS IT. This is a truly wonderful film that left me wanting to stand up in my living room and clap when it was finished!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Chip Kaufmann on 12 Jun. 2012
Format: DVD
This clever take on the silent era is a valentine (note the titular character's name) to Old Hollywood and especially to lovers of classic movies. Unknown French director Michel Hazanavicius, who also wrote the screenplay, wanted to take on the challange of making a silent film, complete with black & white photography & title cards, in the 21st century. To say that he succeeded (whether you like the film or not) cannot be denied.

The movie opens in 1927 Hollywood. Silent superstar George Valentin (a combination of Douglas Fairbanks Sr & John Gilbert & played by French actor Jean Dujardin) is about to be caught up in the transition to sound. While he is dealing with this crisis, young extra Peppy Miller (a cross between the young Joan Crawford, Clara Bow, & Gloria Swanson & winningly played by Berenice Bejo who just happens to be the director's wife) makes the transition to sound and is on her way up. The parallel to A STAR IS BORN is obvious along with several other references to classic films such as CITIZEN KANE (the breakfast scene), SINGIN' IN THE RAIN (the sound test), & THE THIN MAN (the dog). For the end sequence, pick the Astaire-Rogers musical of your choice.

Along with the French performers, two American character actors are given prominent roles in the proceedings. John Goodman plays the classic Hollywood studio head complete with fat cigar while James Cromwell is George's loyal chauffeur (a reference to SUNSET BOULEVARD). Both adapt themselves well to the silent medium. While there are several references to other classic Hollywood films, THE ARTIST is more than just a simple homage. It's also the heartwarming story of two people headed in different directions with some lightweight comedy thrown in & one classic scene between Berenice Bejo & an empty coat.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By M. Dowden HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 7 Jun. 2012
Format: DVD
There are many movies made, but only a small minority of them are really great, and this film is definitely one of them. When I first heard about this I thought that it would be something arty that only a few people would want to see, but after seeing it I was bowled over. Beautifully shot in black and white, with a superb cast and a great musical score, there is nothing to dislike here.

The main story is of course a romance, but also with this is the story of how a lot of actors failed to make it when the 'Talkies' came along, even though they had been big before then. So, why would you want to watch a silent movie? The story here only really has a minimal dialogue on the screen, so in a way you can make up some of it yourself, but on top of that this film evokes the era it is about. All the actors, especially the two principal actors pull off with quite some aplomb how acting used to be back in the old days. Without a soundtrack things were expressed more visibly, which isn't necessarily that easy, as it can so easily come across as camp today. Thankfully that doesn't happen here, and you can relive the experience like when our grandparents first watched movies.

Of course, there are human actors here, but what would this be without the dog? A real star. This DVD does have extras, which include the making of the film, along with pieces about the locations, etc., and also there is a bloopers piece as well. This is well worth getting and is a thing of beauty, a film that really is a piece of art.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again