The Art of Philosophy: Wisdom as a Practice and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Art of Philosophy: Wi... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Expedited shipping available on this book. The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Art of Philosophy: Wisdom as a Practice Paperback – 14 Sep 2012


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£13.95
£6.68 £5.70
£13.95 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Art of Philosophy: Wisdom as a Practice + You Must Change Your Life + In the World Interior of Capital: Towards a Philosophical Theory of Globalization
Price For All Three: £64.44

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press; Tra edition (14 Sept. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0231158718
  • ISBN-13: 978-0231158718
  • Product Dimensions: 20.8 x 14 x 1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 130,250 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

A very provocative, historically penetrating, and paradigm-changing analysis of both modern and postmodern thought, which may be considered one of Peter Sloterdijk's most brilliant contributions to date to what has come to be called 'public philosophy.' This translation is vigorous and engaging and captures in different contexts the ramifications and rhetorical force of Sloterdijk's original German. -- Carl Raschke, University of Denver ...spicily vigorous... Guardian A spirited brief for Aristotelian-moderated philosophy... -- Carlin Romano Chronicle of Higher Education

About the Author

Peter Sloterdijk is professor of aesthetics and philosophy at the Institute of Design in Karlsruhe and teaches at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna. Recently named one of the world's top intellectuals by Prospect and Foreign Policy magazines, his numerous works include Rage and Time: A Psychopolitical Investigation and the best-selling Critique of Cynical Reason. Karen Margolis is a writer and translator living in Berlin. A graduate in mathematics from the London School of Economics, she coauthored The Technology of Political Control and has published fiction, memoirs, poetry, and translations.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Moon Michael on 16 Dec. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Art of Philosophy
Peter Sloterdijk
Translated from the German by Karen Margolis

If I found the main title of this short book rather vague, the subtitle "Wisdom as a Practice" is positively misleading. Neither title bears more than the slightest similarity to its German original.
The introductory chapter entitled "Theory as a Form of the Life of Practice" goes some way to clearing up the arising misunderstandings but omits to mention that the concept of "wisdom" is nowhere dealt with in this book. The word "practice", on the other hand, (which in this case is a translation of the German Übung) occurs repeatedly, especially in this introduction, but is never adequately defined. A standard and neutral meaning might be "that which practitioners professionally engage in", be this medicine, law, politics, or whatever. Sloterdijk occasionally uses the word in this sense but he is more concerned with those meanings that are connected to training, exercise, sporting prowess and numerous forms of self-directed therapy. A third sense of the word is that of "praxis", which can briefly be defined as the integral totality of everyday behaviour (practice) along with a theoretical understanding that informs this behaviour. The author, to my disappointment, steers clear of this sense of the word.
The burden of the bulk of this book - its three main chapters - is twofold. The first thesis argues that philosophy historically appears on the scene when the striving towards a peaceful, democratic and egalitarian rule of law has failed. Sloterdijk sums this up succinctly in the words: "Minerva's owl thus began its flight over the scenery of an extinguished democracy" (p.47).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
Peter Sloterdijik is a prolific and original contemporary philosopher in the best Western tradition. His writings deserve careful reading, though some of them are quite demanding and require background knowledge. Thus, to fully benefit from this 107 pages short book one should first read his 500 pages book You Must Change your Life!.
At the center of The Art of Philosophy is the seeking of a detached "angelic" view of the world with the help of a fitting way of life, as central to Plato and most of pre-modern Western philosophy, in contrast to an "embedded" view of the mind as bound by the body, emotions and one's habitus in time-space. The latter puts strict limits on human ability to arrive at absolutely true theories, and the very concept of such theories; while the first, though recognizing the limits of most human beings, regard some approximation of theories uncontaminated by human limits as achievable by persons who distance themselves from the world in one way or another.
The author might have done well to include at least some discourse on relevant Asian philosophies, and take into account other treatments, such as by Thomas Nagel in his book The View from Nowhere (1986). Consideration of differences between social theories, which are clearly very influenced by emotions and contexts, and abstract physical theories, such as quantum theory, which also depend on propensities of the human mind but are much less biased by personality features and habitus, might have added a lot to the book. But, instead of going into substance, I would like to apply the book briefly to the context of public policy making on two levels: intelligence analysts and political leaders.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
POSING A CRITICAL ISSUE 24 April 2013
By Yehezkel Dror - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Peter Sloterdijik is a prolific and original contemporary philosopher in the best Western tradition. His writings deserve careful reading, though some of them are quite demanding and require background knowledge. Thus, to fully benefit from this 107 pages short book one should first read his 500 pages book You Must Change your Life!.
At the center of The Art of Philosophy is the seeking of a detached "angelic" view of the world with the help of a fitting way of life, as central to Plato and most of pre-modern Western philosophy, in contrast to an "embedded" view of the mind as bound by the body, emotions and one's habitus in time-space. The latter puts strict limits on human ability to arrive at absolutely true theories, and the very concept of such theories; while the first, though recognizing the limits of most human beings, regard some approximation of theories uncontaminated by human limits as achievable by persons who distance themselves from the world in one way or another.
The author might have done well to include at least some discourse on relevant Asian philosophies, and take into account other treatments, such as by Thomas Nagel in his book The View from Nowhere (1986). Consideration of differences between social theories, which are clearly very influenced by emotions and contexts, and abstract physical theories, such as quantum theory, which also depend on propensities of the human mind but are much less biased by personality features and habitus, might have added a lot to the book. But, instead of going into substance, I would like to apply the book briefly to the context of public policy making on two levels: intelligence analysts and political leaders.
Intelligence analysts are very susceptible to influence by institutional cultures, personal values and hierarchical pressures. Therefore, efforts to include in their work "distance-creating" practices, such as time for solitary thinking and exposure to different cultures and life experiences, are mandatory. It seems that this is seldom done.
Even more pressing is the need to get political leaders out from current pressure overloads, which cannot but spoil their decisions. Retreats, Sabbaticals, remonstrating pluralistic advisors - these illustrate doable recommendations. But, first, they must be made aware of their dependence on biased theories, however "pragmatic" they see themselves, so as to open their minds to integrate at least some "contemplation" and abstract thinking into "action". This is all the more urgently needed for coping with unprecedented dangers and opportunities increasingly facing humanity.
I recommend this book for careful reading with such or other applications in mind.
Professor Yehezkel Dror
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
8 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Interesting as Intellectual History, But Anything More? 24 Sept. 2013
By Thomas Leddy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The best I could say for this book is that it kept my attention to the end. Sloterdijk is interesting if you take him to be doing a kind of intellectual history. He has managed to connect up several strands of a philosophical tradition that goes back to Socrates and extends to Husserl and that emphasizes the idea of philosophical detachment. Sloterdijk is especially taken with the idea of epoche as found in Husserl's writings. I first studied Husserl under Maurice Natanson at UC Santa Cruz. Natanson treated the epoche as a kind of mystical thing: either you got it or you didn't. I had recently rejected Christianity and was not ready to take up another set of beliefs based on faith. Now, many years later, I find that Sloterdijk is presenting something similar. His efforts to recover pure thought and transcendent experience get sort of manic in the last chapter when he talks about various attempts to "assassinate" the neutral observer i.e. the one Husserl tried to create (or revive). The assassins include Marx, Nietzsche, and Heidegger (although the last one recanted after WWII), and then, get this, the nuclear bomb! I always did enjoy the passage in the Symposium where Socrates was lost in thought, but Sloterdijk makes a big deal of this, as also the idea that philosophy is practicing to die. Frankly, one cannot know what Socrates' contemplative moments gave him, and it is hard to make any sense at all of practicing to die unless you really believe in an afterlife or the possibility of complete detachment from the body. Readers who want to follow the vita contempliva could get more out of the Zen Buddhist tradition which at least gives one various meditative practices tested over time. Sloterdijk just gives us intellectual history in the form of a series of bon mots and a lot of complaining. Although Sloterdijk insists that the epoche needs to be examined in neutral terms, by the end of the book one doesn't feel that this is the point, but rather that philosophers should detach themselves from life and try to become like angels. You have to be kidding. One is tempted to follow Nietzsche's Zarathustra here and classify this guy as one of the "preachers of death." There is a lot to the ideas of contemplation, philosophy as contemplation, and phenomenology, as long as one does not take this to be a science-like activity that gives up apodictic truths, something more like an art. This is why I was attracted to this book originally: after all it was called "the art of philosophy." But that turns out to be a misnomer. The translator admits in the opening note that the original title was "Suspended Animation in Thought," which pretty much sums it up. In my view, a much more effective thinker on the nature of thought is John Dewey, the great American pragmatist. Dewey would have been rightly horrified by a sentence like this: "Thinking creates an artificial autism that isolates the thinker and takes him to a special world of imperatively connected ideas." Autism is good?
A comprehensive Sloterdijk 4 Sept. 2013
By Orivaldo Lopes Junior - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Conferences in form of a book! This book helps us to grasp with enogh depth Sloterdijk inovative ideas on Philosophy and Religion as trainning. He links art and Philosophy in an way that is quite criative. It's a perfect option to get into this extraordinary philosopher.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Look for similar items by category


Feedback