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The Art of Not Making: The New Artist / Artisan Relationship Paperback – 30 Jan 2012


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Product details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Thames and Hudson Ltd; Reprint edition (30 Jan. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0500290261
  • ISBN-13: 978-0500290262
  • Product Dimensions: 2.3 x 0.2 x 2.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 191,723 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

www.michaelpetry.net

www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/dr-michael-petry/

Petry's current book - Nature Morte: Contemporary Artists reinvigorate the Still-life tradition has just been published by Thames & Hudson. The hardback is in 4 editions and in 3 languages (English, German and Dutch). His recent book is The Art of Not Making (Thames & Hudson, Hardback, 2011, Paperback, 2012), and Petry had a one-man exhibition at the Palm Springs Art Museum last year. The book that accompanied the show is The Touch of the Oracle, a full colour 144 page monograph of his recent work, available through Thames & Hudson with texts by Adrian George, Katherine Hough, and Petry (ISBN: 978-0-9569116-1-2)

Michael Petry was born in El Paso, Texas (1960) and has lived in London since 1981. He studied at Rice University, Houston (BA), London Guildhall University (MA), and is a Doctor in Arts (Middlesex University). An internationally exhibited multi-media artist, and co-founder of the Museum of Installation, he lectures part time at the Royal Academy Schools, where he is the curator of the Royal Academy Schools Gallery. Petry is a Fellow of the Royal British Society of Sculptors (FRBS) and a Brother of the Art Workers Guild. He was Guest Curator at the KunstAkademi, Oslo, and Research Fellow at the University of Wolverhampton. Petry co-authored Installation Art (1994), and Installation in the New Millennium (2003), and authored Abstract Eroticism (1996) and A Thing of Beauty is...(1997). The Trouble with Michael, a monograph of his practice, was published by Art Media Press in 2001. Petry's book Hidden Histories: 20th century male same sex lovers in the visual arts (2004) is the first comprehensive survey of its kind, and accompanied the exhibition Hidden Histories he curated for The New Art Gallery Walsall. Petry is the Director of the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) London. His two-volume book Golden Rain (2008) accompanied his installation for the On the Edge exhibition for Stavanger 2008, European Capital of Culture. Petry was the first Artist in Residence at Sir John Soane's Museum (2010/11), and the catalogue Smoke & Mirrors (2011) documents his two shows there: Touching the Neoclassical & the Romantic, and Bad Seed. His recent one man show The Touch of the Oracle at the Palm Springs Art Museum (2012) was accompanied by a ten year career review book distributed by Thames & Hudson. Petry will give the Campbell Lecture Series on March 7,8,9 at Rice University, Houston

Product Description

Review

This visual and conceptual exploration of the artist-artisan relationship makes this book unique and appropriate for all levels of aesthetic practice and appreciation.<br /<>br >Fascinating --Mayfair Times<br /<>br >This book is a gem ... Petry's wonderful book illustrates hundreds of artists [...] but it is the way in which the arguments for creative alliance are presented that really grab the attention ... A highly recommended, thoroughly enjoyable, informative read --Royal West of England Academy

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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By arts guy on 8 May 2011
Format: Hardcover
Fascinating study of how artist increasingly have work made for them, ranging from those involved and learning from the `fabricator' to those who are completely detached. Full of intriguing work I wasn't familiar with, he divides it by materials (glass, metal, stone, textiles etc). The feeling of fabricators as master `craft' people is emphasised by this and particularly since painting is not covered. I'm an artist inherently resistant to art conceived by one person but made totally by another (usually unacknowledged) particularly with no understanding of the material by the 'ideas merchant' but I have to say this book gave me much pause for thought. Its undeniable that we are better off with some of the wonderful art shown than without it, and its probably better for having been farmed out to `experts'. Petry tries hard to credit the makers not just the artists which is great and any idea that craft is tame is dispelled by some very edgy and provocative themes. His text is immensely readable, without being dumb, not the usual art-speak babble just clear and straightforward so thank goodness for that. There's far too many flash looking, but totally unreadable books on contemporary art out there. This isn't one of them.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Paul Bowes TOP 500 REVIEWER on 5 Feb. 2012
Format: Paperback
'The Art of Not Making" is a study of contemporary art that is dependent for its realisation on expert contributions from artisans. The author, Michael Petry, is a practising artist - a couple of examples of his work are included - and he is well equipped to discuss the work illustrated in the over 300 colour illustrations.

After a contextual introduction, the book has been divided by material: a choice that produces one rather strange consequence, when work in wood finds itself in a final section devoted to 'Other Materials', while glass, metal, stone and textiles - not obviously more difficult or important - earn their own sections. An appendix features interviews with artisans and artists that throw further light on their working relationships.

The work discussed is of a uniformly high standard, and Petry's text makes clear that the relationship between artist and artisan in such work may take many different forms, from almost completely hands-off to intense involvement on the part of the artist. This book makes a coherent case for work of this type. It is hard to imagine the task done better. The wide variety of materials and techniques involved make for a visual feast.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By readyreader on 14 Jun. 2011
Format: Hardcover
this book is plush! amazing photos, great selection of work. really interesting in the theory side, vey contemporary and all round a good read. chapters split up by materials such as glass, metal, textile etc
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