Shop now Shop Clothing clo_fly_aw15_NA_shoes Shop All Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Paperwhite Shop now Shop Now Shop now
Watch now

Quantity:1
The Arbor [Blu-ray] has been added to your Basket
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by zoverstocks
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Buy with confidence from a huge UK seller with over 3 million feedback ratings, all items despatched next day directly from the UK. All items are quality guaranteed.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • The Arbor [Blu-ray]
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

The Arbor [Blu-ray]

18 customer reviews

Price: £11.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
29 new from £4.29 4 used from £3.72 1 collectible from £13.20

Amazon Instant Video

Watch The Arbor instantly from £2.49 with Amazon Instant Video
Also available to rent on Blu-ray from LOVEFiLM By Post
£11.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Save £20 on Amazon.co.uk with the aqua Classic card. Get an initial credit line of £250-£1,200 and build your credit rating. Representative 32.9% APR (variable). Subject to term and conditions. Learn more.

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Arbor [Blu-ray]
  • +
  • The Selfish Giant [Blu-ray]
Total price: £20.72
Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product details

  • Actors: Manjinder Virk, Neil Dudgeon, Monica Dolan, Danny Webb, Christine Bottomley
  • Directors: Clio Barnard
  • Format: PAL
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region B/2 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 2.55:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Verve Pictures
  • DVD Release Date: 14 Mar. 2011
  • Run Time: 94 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00450AFHY
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 85,334 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

The Arbor is the powerful true story of Bradford playwright Andrea Dunbar (The Arbor, Rita, Sue and Bob Too) and her daughter Lorraine. Andrea wrote honestly and unflinchingly about her upbringing on the notorious Buttershaw Estate in Bradford and was described as a genius straight from the slums. When she died, tragically at the age of 29 in 1990, Lorraine was just ten years old. The Arbor catches up with Lorraine in the present day, also at 29; ostracised from her mother s family and in prison undergoing rehab. Through compelling interviews we learn that Lorraine sees her mother as a destructive force throughout her childhood; an alcoholic who let her suffer abuse and whom Lorraine blames for all that is wrong in her life. Through interviews with other members of the Dunbar family, we see a contrasting view of Andrea, in particular from Lorraine s younger sister Lisa, who idolises Andrea to this day. Re-introduced to her mother s plays and private letters whilst in prison, the film follows Lorraine s personal journey as she reflects on her own life and begins to understand the struggles her mother faced. A truly unique blend of documentary and fiction, The Arbor is a captivating and revelatory piece of cinema.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Man Out Of Time on 23 Sept. 2013
Format: DVD
The Arbor is the best documentary film I've seen since Dreams Of A Life. Like that film, it also hits you with one hell of an emotional punch in its slow unravelling of a tragic life.

Andrea Dunbar was a flickering flame that burned bright but all too swiftly. She wrote her first play, The Arbor, at the age of 15 in one of her school books. Heavily based on her own life on the Brafferton Arbor, a street on Buttershaw Estate, Bradford, the play - like all of Dunbar's writing - had a realistic rhythm to its dialogue that is redolent of working class northern communities. Dunbar was an observer and recorder and it is still staggering to think of the work she produced at such an early age. In an interesting diversion (and a chance to gain more of an understanding of Dunbar through this semi autobiographical work) scenes from The Arbor are played out in the very street itself by actors like Natalie Gavin and Jimi Mistry, making for unique theatre, and interspersed with clips from archive documentary and interview footage featuring Andrea, her mother and father. Her next play was probably her most famous, Rita Sue and Bob Too which was subsequently turned into a film in the mid 80s. By the end of that decade however, Andrea was dead. Collapsing of a brain tumour in her local boozer (the one featured in the infamous Black Lace 'Gangbang' song scene in the aforementioned film) at the age of 29.

The Arbor is an engrossing experimental drama that seeks to explore the life of Dunbar and her kin as well as being a social document for the neighbourhood itself.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Miss RCD Foster on 17 April 2011
Format: DVD
I bought this movie only because Mark Kermode (the BBC Radio5 Live & Culture Show presenter) talked about it on his radio show. I am so glad that I did.

I watched it with really no idea what it was about, which probably helped my reception because I was totally blown away! It is really not very often that I say those words, I watch a lot of movies and although there are a lot that I really good but sadly few get to me me in quite the way this one did.

I was so captivated by it. There are a couple of different narrative threads running through the story told in subtly different styles/techniques but the way they are amalgamated to tell the overall story is just fascinating.

I cannot rate this film highly enough, watch this movie!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Keith M TOP 500 REVIEWER on 26 July 2014
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Yorkshire-born film-maker Clio Barnard’s 2010 debut film, The Arbor, based on the life of Bradford-born 'teenage playwright’ Andrea Dunbar is one of the most original films I have seen in recent years. Mixing actual documentary footage, long stretches of 'dramatised’ pseudo-documentary (in which actors lip-synch the words of real-life characters from Dunbar’s troubled life) and 're-staged’ sections of Dunbar’s ‘breakthrough’ play (which shares its title with Barnard’s film), The Arbor is a painfully uncompromising, though frequently highly innovative, take on modern Britain’s 'urban underclass’, together with all the issues of social disintegration they currently face.

The Arbor is certainly not an easy watch, dealing as it does with issues of poverty, family dysfunction, drug and alcohol addiction, domestic violence, racism and underage sex. And Barnard’s choice to depict such relatively common 'cinematic fare’ via the real-life story of the briefly celebrated (before her early death in 1990 aged 29) 15-year old 'genius’ (Shelagh Delaney’s words), Dunbar, adds considerable weight to her film. That Barnard has managed to produce such an assured and inventive piece of work – the film’s re-staging of extracts from Dunbar’s play The Arbor on a Bradford estate 'green’, as members of 'the public’ look on, provides one of the film’s many highlights – whilst maintaining an even-handed, non-judgemental approach to the material (is social conditioning or lack of personal responsibility the prime cause of her protagonists’ problems?), is all the more remarkable given her lack of experience.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By atouchsensitive on 5 Nov. 2010
Format: DVD
This film is ground-breaking, and also heart-breaking. Totally original approach to the subject matter. Essential viewing to anyone who cares about life and the hand we are dealt. Innovative and compelling, this film demands attention.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By R. Jenner on 15 Oct. 2014
Format: DVD
I watched this film after really enjoying another Clio Barnard film - The Selfish Giant, which I thought was wonderful. However, I found The Arbor really quite drab. It's a really odd format, mingling documentary interviews with actors. OK, so the story is intense and is able to maintain a modicum of interest, but I found it simply boring to watch. In fact, you would do just as well to listen to the same story on the radio. I can watch these sort of film documentaries when it features the actual people, but when its largely actors simply delivering interview text, it just loses its impact. Really struggled to maintain enough discipline to make it to the end, and kinda regretted wasting the time afterwards. Going against the prevailing wind here as everyone else seems to like it. I guess I must be missing something. Watch The Selfish Giant instead - it's masterful.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   



Feedback