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The Arab Spring: The End of Postcolonialism
 
 

The Arab Spring: The End of Postcolonialism [Kindle Edition]

Hamid Dabashi
1.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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Review

"A refreshing, thoughtful and historical reading of the dramatic changes sweeping the Arab world." - Marwan Bishara, senior political analyst, " Al Jazeera
"
"Dabashi provides a revolutionary, imaginative and open-ended reading of what will turn out to be a founding moment of the twenty-first century." - Fawwaz Traboulsi, author of "A History of Modern Lebanon
"
"This illuminating and beautifully written book, by a brave intellectual and a brilliant scholar who knows the terrain like the back of his hand, traces the genealogy of this unique moment and offers a bird's eye view of the horizons it promises." - Sinan Antoon, poet and novelist

""The Arab Spring" is enormously enlightening and original, a landmark work of a political and historical convulsion of immense proportion and significance. The book is so rich, careful and systematic in making its case that I expect it to define a new paradigm regarding the nature of revolution itself." - Alamin Mazrui, Rutgers University

"Embracing the poetic justice of the Arab Spring, Hamid Dabashi seizes upon and expresses the lyrical. He recounts philosophically an open-ended non-linear story, which is still in the making." - Elia Suleiman, filmmaker

"The depth and richness of Dabashi's perspective contrasts with the barrenness of the modernization paradigm dominant in the West's academy and media as much as in liberal, nationalist and socialist Arab accounts. It offers a fresh look at some deeper resources of Arab societies and cultures." - Haifa Zangana, writer and activist

Product Description

This pioneering explanation of the Arab Spring will define a new era of thinking about the Middle East. In this landmark book, Hamid Dabashi argues that the uprisings occurring from Morocco to Iran and from Syria to Yemen have been driven by a delayed defiance that signifies no less than the end of postcolonialism. Dabashi shows how the Arab Spring has so radically altered the geopolitics of the region that we must now re-imagine the ‘Middle East’. And, as he brilliantly explains, the permanent revolutionary mood has the potential to liberate not only those societies already ignited but ultimately many others as well.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 572 KB
  • Print Length: 297 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1780322232
  • Publisher: Zed Books; 1 edition (15 Nov 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00A76WXD4
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 1.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #384,083 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Hamid Dabashi is the Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. Born in Iran, he received a dual PhD in Sociology of Culture and Islamic Studies from the University of Pennsylvania, followed by a postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard University. Dabashi has written 20 books, edited four, and written over 100 chapters, essays, articles and book reviews. An internationally renowned cultural critic, his writings have been translated into numerous languages.

Dabashi has been a columnist for the Egyptian al-Ahram Weekly for over a decade, and is a regular contributor to Aljazeera and CNN. He has been a committed teacher for nearly three decades and is also a public speaker, a current affairs essayist, a staunch anti-war activist, and the founder of Dreams of a Nation. He has four children and lives in New York with his wife, the Iranian-Swedish feminist scholar and photographer Golbarg Bashi.

Follow him on Twitter @HamidDabashi
Visit his website http://www.hamiddabashi.com/

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
10 of 15 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not the book about Arab Spring 17 Feb 2013
Format:Paperback
I was looking forward to reading a good book on events in the Middle East in 2011 and 2012 and I was attracted to this book for two reasons: the first is obviously because of its title "Arab Spring", so you cannot go wrong if this is what you want to read about. The second is almost my blind trust in every book that comes out from Zed Books. However, I regret to say that I was very disappointed. The author delves into a very lengthy monologue about cultural analysis from every corner of the western canon which takes a fair deal of the pages of the book. If you take off all the material about Iran and its supposedly 2009 spring, the remainder is a thin account of the "Arab Spring". My disappointment did not end here. I was wondering all the time when reading the more relevant sections about the Arab context why would Zed Books publish such a book: the author generously helps himself every few pages to material from Al Jazeera website which it seems he strongly believes in its credibility. The same goes for material from CNN. Moreover, there is pretension to objectivity while the book sails safely around the roles played by Qatar and Saudi in the events and that fact that Al-Jazeera championed Islamist militants everywhere did not bother him. Worst still is his continued enthusiasm that what happened in Cairo and Tunis are signs of big things to happen in the world, comparing them to great events of history. His attack on the Arab Left and his glorification of Fawaz Traboulsi and Azmi Bechara as the greates Arab intellectuals alive betrays his biases and preferences. One will not find serious critqiue of the roles of the United States or the West or Turkey or Saudi, etc. Read more ›
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Amazon.com: 3.0 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not the book about Arab Spring 19 Feb 2013
By Samir Kassir - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I was looking forward to reading a good book on events in the Middle East in 2011 and 2012 and I was attracted to this book for two reasons: the first is obviously because of its title "Arab Spring", so you cannot go wrong if this is what you want to read about. The second is almost my blind trust in every book that comes out from Zed Books. However, I regret to say that I was very disappointed. The author delves into a very lengthy monologue about cultural analysis from every corner of the western canon which takes a fair deal of the pages of the book. If you take off all the material about Iran and its supposedly 2009 spring, the remainder is a thin account of the "Arab Spring". My disappointment did not end here. I was wondering all the time when reading the more relevant sections about the Arab context why would Zed Books publish such a book: the author generously helps himself every few pages to material from Al Jazeera website which it seems he strongly believes in its credibility. The same goes for material from CNN. Moreover, there is pretension to objectivity while the book sails safely around the roles played by Qatar and Saudi in the events and that fact that Al-Jazeera championed Islamist militants everywhere did not bother him. Worst still is his continued enthusiasm that what happened in Cairo and Tunis are signs of big things to happen in the world, comparing them to great events of history. His attack on the Arab Left and his glorification of Fawaz Traboulsi and Azmi Bechara as the greates Arab intellectuals alive betrays his biases and preferences. One will not find serious critqiue of the roles of the United States or the West or Turkey or Saudi, etc., in the "Arab Spring", partly because the author lacks insights and skills into the economic/political and strategic dimensions of the crises, and stays safely in his cultural studies domain.
It was a great relief to finish reading this book (since I spent money to buy it) and I am glad to give it away to charity. I should credit the author with his effort to search for articles and books, which I plan to look up, and I cannot deny that there were passages that I enjoyed. His English prose is good and for that I grant him one star.
3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Trite Tripe 11 Aug 2013
By Dr. Declan Hayes - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This, as other reviewers have shown is a pathetic attempt to justify the slaughter of minorities, moderates and secularists across the Middle East. Let's see what one of his fan club said: "This book of Hamid Dabashi is one of the best on the currents event in the Middle East and is very easy to read. I really like the way he tries to rely on the Arab Sring as a new political geography which has link with Occupy Wall Street, the Quebec Spring and other stuggle in the public space worldwide". Occupy Wall Street? Did they chop heads off New York minorities? Quebec? Do they gang rape teenagers there in the name of revolutionary springs? Do Quebec separatists eat the organs of their enemies? No? Well don't compare them to those who have invaded Syria at the behest of Qatar and Saudi Arabia.
Although many of the author's thoughts on Israel and America's terror campaign against Iran are well-reasoned, he is too entwined in his own theoretical wonderlands to have any worthwhile views on the ongoing massacre of Arabs by GCC funded psychotics.
4 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very enlightening 22 Nov 2012
By Robert V Mallouk - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This is a thorough and insightful analysis of the spirit sweeping the region to benefit its populations.
It does not presuppose the Arab people as monolithic but acredits them to express the desire steming from the collapse and stand against neo-colonialism.
2 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read 3 Oct 2012
By Rondeau - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book of Hamid Dabashi is one of the best on the currents event in the Middle East and is very easy to read.
I really like the way he tries to rely on the Arab Sring as a new political geography which has link with Occupy Wall Street, the Quebec Spring and other stuggle in the public space worldwide.
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