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The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents: (Discworld Novel 28) (Discworld Novels) Paperback – 29 Apr 2004

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The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents: (Discworld Novel 28) (Discworld Novels) + The Wee Free Men: (Discworld Novel 30) (Discworld Novels) + Wintersmith: (Discworld Novel 35) (Discworld Novels)
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Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Corgi Childrens; New Ed edition (29 April 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 055255202X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0552552028
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 1.9 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (162 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 338,849 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Sir Terry Pratchett was the acclaimed creator of the global bestselling Discworld series, the first of which, The Colour of Magic, was published in 1983. In all, he was the author of fifty bestselling books. His novels have been widely adapted for stage and screen, and he was the winner of multiple prizes, including the Carnegie Medal, as well as being awarded a knighthood for services to literature. Worldwide sales of his books now stand at 70 million, and they have been translated into thirty-seven languages.

Sir Terry Pratchett died on 12th March 2015

Photography © David Bird

Product Description

Amazon Review

Terry Pratchett returns to children's stories and to his infamous Discworld with Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents, a clever spin on the Pied Piper fairytale with a lavish sprinkling of the Practchett magic.

Maurice is a talking cat who leads a band of rather special rats from town to town to fake invasions of vermin. Keith, in cahoots with Maurice, turns up with his flute and leads the rats out of town--a hefty reward in tow. It's a scam that works perfectly... until they arrive in the town of Bad Blintz and their ruse is sussed by the young girl Malicia. Maurice and his mice realise they are about to be caught in the middle of something rather bad.

This is a fresh and funny adventure story that allows Pratchett to make free use of his immense comic talents (the talking rats are easily some of his most hilarious creations). It's also full of cute little ideas: the mice take their names from cans and packets lying in rubbish dumps, so we have heroes called "Big Savings" and "Best Before".

Terry Pratchett has created a wonderful, old-fashioned tale where the subtle morals and lessons never hinder the action. Younger children may initially struggle with Mr Pratchett's unusual style, but once they get to grips with the humour, this will be a laugh-a-minute for both kids and their parents. (Ages 8 and over) --Jon Weir --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"An astonishing novel . . . I marvelled at the ferociousness of the humour, and the willingness to go into dark places . . . Were Terry not demonstrably a master craftsman already, The Amazing Maurice might be considered his masterpiece" (Financial Times)

"One of Terry Pratchett's funniest creations of recent years . . . It all adds up to a wonderful book - hilarious, brilliantly constructed and, especially towards its conclusion, shot through with an edginess to balance the laughs" (SFX)

"Ethically challenging, beautifully orchestrated" (Guardian)

"An enticing and occasionally gory introduction to the master of flat earth . . . proves that the Pied Piper of Hamelin was a front for an insider-dealing scam . . . alongside the gags and pest-control politics, there are enough complex ideas about nature, nurture and understanding to satisfy a wide audience" (Observer)

"The humour is sophisticated and demands that the reader keep up to speed. A passion for language, wordplay and puns bursts from the pages" (Daily Telegraph)

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

58 of 58 people found the following review helpful By Stephen A. Haines HALL OF FAME on 31 Jan. 2006
Format: Paperback
On the Discworld, even wizards produce leftovers. Their discarded garbage, however, is laced with traces of magic. Out on the tip, the rats forage in the scraps - apple cores, candle stubs [good carbohydrate source], dogends. Like any trace mineral, the magic builds up until the rats have changed, gaining new talents. Among those talents are speaking and reading. Speaking allows them to communicate better while the reading gives them words to use as names. They're an organized group now, and they have an ambition. They want to find a safe place for retirement. They have a mentor, Maurice, a cat who shares their talents, but has an extra one of his own - he's a con cat. And he has a story hidden away.
A street smart feline, Maurice has learned the value of money. He knows how humans use it, and he wants the independence it offers. To gain it, he's organized the rats and adopted Keith, a rather simple human, into his group. Together, they work the towns to create a "plague of rats" then provide a piper, Keith, to lure them away - for cash. Despite disputes over percentages, the team has scored many successful ventures. But Keith, and the rats, are having misgivings over the ethics of the con. They want to quit, and Bad Blintz will be the last place they work the con.
Every venture has its risks. Bad Blintz is clearly not a rich place. The villagers queue up for bread and sausages, which are in short supply. There are rat catchers who carry strings of tails, but the team can't find a live rat anywhere in the maze of cellars and tunnels beneath the town. In resolving this conundrum, team encounters a powerful new force - one that challenges all the skills given them by the wizards' residue magic. Their very survival rests on how they deal with the mystery.
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37 of 37 people found the following review helpful By JBV VINE VOICE on 31 Oct. 2001
Format: Hardcover
This book has been aimed at those children who like the wicked witch to be shoved into the oven, rather than those who like Mr Bunnykins!
While the only regular characters that appear are The Grim Squeaker and Death (only cameo appearances), the story of Darktan, Maurice and the rest is typical Pratchett.
The Story has a rather dark sense of humour, which most kids will love, but it's this darker motiff that will enable most adult fans to enjoy this book to.
Personaly, I hope there will be a sequel, as the Rats certainly have lots of character.
Ignore the fact its aimed at children and try it, you WILL like it.
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29 of 29 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 22 Nov. 2001
Format: Hardcover
'The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents' has to be the funniest book i have read so far. It was hilarious from beginning to end and the ideas within the book are superb. Comedy and Fantasy rolled up into one. I could not put this book down! The names within the book of the rats are brilliant. A thoroughly enjoyable book that is not to be missed.
The best characters within the book by far have to be 'Darktan', the rat with a good instinct for traps within his own trap disposal squad and 'Sardines'; the rat who wears a home made hat and tap dances to scare humans. Hilarious. do not miss!!! I have never read such a well scripted book, the jokes are great. 'Amazing Maurice and his educated rodents'; a book i would recommend to anyone and everyone. Even those who dont like rats, after reading this book you'll be in love with Terry Pratchetts educated rats and as for 'Maurice', we all knew that there is something very sly going on in cats minds when they wrap themselves around our legs...and purr so innocently at us. A little insight into what our feline friends are REALLY thinking.
Excellent!, brilliant!, hilarious!, A thoroughly enjoyable book for all ages.
Go read it now!!!!
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By "silversnowstorm" on 16 Sept. 2004
Format: Paperback
I remember first coming across this book when my little sister received it as a present. Frankly I thought it would be childish, and only turned to it when I had nothing left to read of my own, but how wrong I was. Even as a member of the 'mtv generation' this book had me completely entralled. Pratchett has to be one of the most eloquent and talented writers of out time and I can't believe I left it as late as my teens to discover him.
This book basically folows the escapades of Maurice, the cat, and his troop of intelligent rats (most of which have wonderfully inventive names, e.g Hamnpork, Dangerous Beans and Nourishing). With a couple of humans thrown in (Keith and Malicia) the cast is complete. It all sounds pretty benign, doesn't it? But the book it a lot darker than it first seems and you will be gripped from start to finish.
Personal favourite characters of mine were Malicia, whose loose tongue gets her into more trouble than she can afford, Keith, whose gentle nature prevents the book from becoming over-exciting, and Nourishing, a young and nervous rat who I adored from her first entry.
The plot is clever and entralling, with a great ending. I can only hope that one day I will be able to write as well as Pratchett. He is a wonderful story teller, and really, with The Amazing Maurice, his work is flawless.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By ghandibob VINE VOICE on 14 Nov. 2002
Format: Paperback
If I had voice-recognition software my hands would currently be up, high above my head. Of course, I don't. But nevertheless, metaphorically speaking my hands are up. You caught me. I am an unashamed, long-term Pratchett fan. Not the convention type, to be sure. But fan still, and for as long as I can remember.
So, to finally hold a children's book (award-winning children's book, I should say) by Pratchett, set in the margins of the Discworld, is to snap me back into my childhood with the joyous g-force of a sharp and plunging twist on a rollercoaster.
The Amazing Maurice is not a long book, and as ever it takes but the beat on an eyelid to read it through. But this is not about skimming quickly to the end, it is about the thrall of a Pratchett book, the way you sink into it from the very first page, never really looking up until you've finished the last. So: you will read it quickly, maybe in just a day, but you will find at the end of that day, that you have not dressed, eaten, nor remembered to go to work.
The plot here is pared down from those evident in the adult Discworld. It is, indeed, and as advertised on the cover, a Discworld fable. A version of the Pied Piper fable, retold with style. What is does brilliantly, though, and in its own right, is cosset the reader in the murk of the rat tunnels in which so much time is spent. You are underground, swaddled in darkness throughout, and though much of it is funny, there is a real and urgent sense of fear in the book. There is malice and fright and wit and death and laughter, all underpinned by the particular brand of common-sense, ethical and humane logic that makes Pratchett so much more than just a fantasy author.
The characters are, perhaps, a little too typical of the Discworld.
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