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The Airing of Grievances CD


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Music

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Biography

Local Business is the third album by Titus Andronicus.

While the first two albums were elaborate concoctions, Local Business is of the earth. Titus Andronicus the studious recording project and Titus Andronicus the raucous touring machine are no longer two distinct beings; there is only Titus Andronicus, rock and roll band.

The lineup is: Patrick Stickles ... Read more in Amazon's Titus Andronicus Store

Visit Amazon's Titus Andronicus Store
for 4 albums, 5 photos, discussions, and more.

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Product details

  • Audio CD (26 Jan. 2009)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: XL
  • ASIN: B001NX2VGE
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 8,739 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Fear and Loathing in Mahwah, NJ
2. My Time Outside the Womb
3. Joset of Nazareth's Blues
4. Arms Against Atrophy
5. Upon Viewing Brueghel's 'Landscape With the Fall of Icarus'
6. Titus Andronicus
7. No Future Part One
8. No Future Part Two: The Day After No Future
9. Albert Camus

Product Description

Product Description

CD Merok Records, MECD019, 2009, 11 Track

BBC Review

The Airing Of Grievances - the debut album by 'regular New Jersey guys' Titus Andronicus - is on the whole just a little too ordinary. There's a lot of teenage angst here, but as yet they lack the skills necessary to translate their venting into song. They have unarguable potential, but this album far from realises it.

As often with debuts, there are quoted influences. Though the band's optimistic citations of Springsteen and The Pogues clash spectacularly with those you get from hearing the album - a whisper of the Quo here and there, the occasional glimpse of early Oasis and pithy vocals akin to Placebo's Brian Molko.

Highlights are Arms Against Atrophy and Upon Viewing Brugel's Landscape With The Fall Of Icarus where Stickles comes closest to greatness managing to sound uncannily like Jack White. And eponymous track Titus Andronicus - with its acoustic handclaps and catchy hook, ''your life is over'' - is also pretty cool.

But after that hope is repeatedly dashed - the promisingly-titled Joset Of Nazareth's Blues is in fact a smattering of indecipherable screamy vocals over good, albeit wasted, harmonica. No Future never escapes dirgey beginnings - compared to No Future Pt II, it should have been left on the shelf.

Penned in the gap between high school and college, The Airing Of Grievances' song titles are sprinkled with scholarly references. The content is wholly autobiographical - but how relevant will it be outside the pleasantly suburban setting of Glen Rock? This is a backdrop frustratingly close to, yet miles away from, big cool NYC.

The band say they want to be seen as real human beings rather than worshipped as gods of rock. Well at the moment, they're a little too real - read also geeky, bog standard and normal. But if they work at polishing their inner rock star, Titus Andronicus could just be onto something. --Sophie Bruce

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By russell clarke TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 1 Feb. 2009
Format: Audio CD
The Oxford Shakespeare: Titus Andronicus (Oxford World's Classics) is an early Shakespeare play set in in the latter days of The Roman Empire and is a revenge tragedy with over the top violence , mutilations and rape .In the current climate the BBC would turn puce if a new of the block writer offered it to them and politely decline. Anyway naming your band after the play is a statement of sorts I suppose.
This band hailing from Glen Rock New Jersey , given their moniker , have a suitably visceral , aggressive, almost nihilistic approach to music. Trebly guitars that would flay the skin off a saltwater crocodile screech around, drums crack like skulls on kerbstones and singer Sarim Al-Rawl shreds his vocal chords in a manner most uncompromising and committed. There is , according to the sleeve notes, piano and cello in the mix somewhere but I'm beggared if I can hear it. All in all their approach is hugely admirable but is it any good.?Does it get the juices flowing?
I'm pleased to offer a hearty yes to both those self posed questions. The sound may be a touch impenetrable at first but when you bear in mind this is a re-mastered re-release of the album after it first saw the light of day on some tiny U.S. independent label last year you realise how much more incoherent it could have been.
In an age when guitar bands ,with the odd exception, are anodyne peddlers of vacuous indie-lite it's refreshing to hear a band who make a racket without resorting to convoluted fret posturing or trebly bluster. The songs are mostly good enough to escape such allusions .
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Gannon on 2 Mar. 2009
Format: Audio CD
Fancy garage-punk and alt.country all on one record? Titus Andronicus did, and this concise opus is the result. Titus Andronicus sound like Cursive as a result, and quite often recall (m)any of the fractured beauties from the Saddle Creek stable. There is a respectful duplicity in the often-raw garage-punk fuzz and the wistful harmonica and steel strings of alt.country.

`My Time Outside The Womb' is a toe-tapping affair stained with Bright Eyes and a dark heart. `Joset Of Nazareth's Blues' recalls Rilo Kiley but that bit more abrasive. The self-titled `Titus Andronicus' is a bouncy, shambly number which brings Black Lips to mind, their nihilist call to arms rings in the air long after the spinning stops, "Your life is over" the mantra. `No Future, Pt. 1' is a poignant lament to that future-scape just described.

Their control and clarity is commendable, only afterwards seeming to add the shambolic façade. This is a stripped album containing no excess, except perhaps in its members' presumable, personal vice. Neither tragedy, nor comedy, Titus Andronicus are very serious contenders indeed.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Imagine, if you can, Conor Oberst on a Springsteen bender and fronting the early Replacements, or Social Distortion covering the Pogues and you're still only halfway to picturing the storm that Titus Andronicus whip up. This is one of those albums that's deserving of a much wider audience than the one that it will probably get. Patrick Stickles is a great lyricist in the Bright Eyes mould - downtrodden, heartbroken and full of venom - but far from being depressing, these rabble-rousing anthems are utterly life-affirming and embody everything that good rock music should be about. The lyrics to 'Titus Andronicus', for example - "No more cigarettes/no more having sex/no more drinking till you fall on the floor" - and it's closing terrace chant of "Your life is over!" make death and misery seem like something to be heartily embraced instead of fought against. These guys are spiteful, sloppy, raucus, hideously depressed, raging at the world that made them that way, and absolutely steaming drunk to boot. The sound is rough and ready to say the least but the band are clearly having a whale of a time - so much so that they forgot to produce the album. Lyrically there's a great mix of the personal and the political, and musically there are hints of everything from Bright Eyes to The Boss and 60s doo-wop to Sham 69 . It sounds, quite frankly, like an absolute riot, and anyone whose been to one of their live shows will attest to their endless energy, charisma and raw power. Their 'screw it all' attitude is remeniscent of some of the first 'Mats records and that's something that folks of a certain disposition will find extremely appealing. Highly recommended for fans of the Replacements, Social D, Flogging Molly, Desaparecidos etc etc etc.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By experimusicdotcom on 8 May 2008
Format: Audio CD
Can passion be substituted for virtually every other attribute that characterizes good music? Many would point to Conor Oberst as proof that it can, but personally, I remain unconvinced by his albums, which range from enjoyable to embarrassingly droll. Especially more recently, he's tended to overlook the fact that if you're gonna make emotion be the core-attraction of your music, you shouldn't drown it out with string sections and excess compositional prowess. If someone's gonna stake out the claim that emotion trumps content, I say they should instead turn to Titus Andronicus, whose dedication to fervor and fire is only further strengthened by their muscular, musical simplicity.

It's appropriate that I should open a review for The Airing of Grievances with a mention of Conor, because the lead vocalist of Titus Andronicus has a raspy and emotive voice that recalls the indie boy-wonder at his most searing, longing and corrosively punk-damaged. Unlike Bright Eyes, however, which too often contrasted Conor's quavering voice with spotless pop, the enraged and implosive screams and gang-shouts on The Airing of Grievances are perfectly appropriate for the music. The bulk of the album is made up of Flogging Molly-esque bar anthems that recall Punk in terms of volume and energy, but bring to mind The Hold Steady's dedication to painting pervasive pictures of parties and recklessness. In other words, these songs are freaking loud. The band begins with their amps at 11 and get progressively louder, nearly falling apart under the weight of every member plowing a single progression into the ground.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Shakepeare's favorite bar band 26 Jun. 2008
By Scott Bresinger - Published on Amazon.com
("The Airing of Grievances" by Titus Andronicus)

Taking their name from Shakepeare's bloodiest, most violent tragedy, New Jersey's Titus Andronicus could be the American response to Arctic Monkeys. While the two bands sonically have little in common, adulation from the blogosphere and Pitchfork Media have focused white hot attention to their debut album. With a rowdy bar band attitude and sweeping choruses, not to mention the occasional blast of horns, they could be called a punk rock version of Springsteen's E Street Band. Okay, that's sadly inevitable for a New Jersey band, but this time the comparison holds water. Filled with working class ennui and rage, but also with brains to match, not to mention the ability to write catchy indie-punk songs, TA will get you sweaty and drunk just by listening to them.

The album opens with their all-purpose anthem, "Fear and Loathing in Mahwah, NJ," a song that starts out soft and hushed but comes alive with a hoarse shout of "F**K You!" What follows throughout the rest of the album is all breakneck speed, go-for-broke rock n' roll excess, the very example of a band with too many ideas let loose in the studio for the first time. It's all a little exausting, but one supposes it was meant to be. To extend the Boss comparison, imagine a show that was all "Born To Run" and "Thunder Road" but no "I'm On Fire." Even the relatively slow "No Future, Part One" leads into the faster tempo of the cheekily-titled "No Future, Part Two: The Day After No Future." They're not stopping to catch a breath, so why should you?

Some random notes: the album's name is taken from an episode of "Seinfeld" (you know, the one about "Festivus"). The album includes brief end-of-song readings from the original Shakespeare play (of course) and a bit from Camus' "The Stranger" (in a song called "Albert Camus"--literature classes in New Jersey are apparentely good). The band's self-titled song is the best thing The Clash never wrote. Singer Patrick Stickles does not, contrary to what many have said, sound like a screaming Conor Oberst--he's closer to an American Joe Strummer. The only real question is: will the band have as long or rich a career as Strummer? I for one can't wait to find out.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Loud, Angry and Worthy 13 April 2009
By Marcus Tullius Wardo - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
It's nice that bands like Titus Andronicus can squeeze fresh songs out of the very simple medium that is punk rock. This album has a lot of classic punk but also a lot of distortion, maybe somewhere between Black Flag and Sonic Youth. The music is loud, proud, and worthy. I don't really know anything about this band, but their lyrics seem to mine the classic theme of youthful alienation, with a post-punk artistic and literary sensibility. Their music is rough and edgy while their lyrics reveal some erudition. If Thurston Moore and Paul Westerberg had somehow teamed up when they were in their early 20's, you might get something like the sound of Titus Andronicus. This is one of my favorite albums released so far in 2009.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
I love it 6 April 2009
By J. Gilmore - Published on Amazon.com
An exhilerating album that sacrifices none its blistering energy to mix in a little bit of pathos. Full of sweeping hooks, machine gun drumming and earnest singing. The reviewer above compares it to Springsteen and he's right-it has all of the honest, hardworking effort and energy of the Boss, but with the speed cranked up to ten and a little less polish and keyboard for a little more crunching guitar. Much better and more real than a lot of the other hyped "indie" stuff to come out lately, and God would I love to see these guys live.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Shakepeare's favorite bar band 25 May 2009
By Scott Bresinger - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
("The Airing of Grievances" by Titus Andronicus)

Taking their name from Shakepeare's bloodiest, most violent tragedy, New Jersey's Titus Andronicus could be the American response to Arctic Monkeys. While the two bands sonically have little in common, adulation from the blogosphere and Pitchfork Media have focused white hot attention to their debut album. With a rowdy bar band attitude and sweeping choruses, not to mention the occasional blast of horns, they could be called a punk rock version of Springsteen's E Street Band. Okay, that's sadly inevitable for a New Jersey band, but this time the comparison holds water. Filled with working class ennui and rage, but also with brains to match, not to mention the ability to write catchy indie-punk songs, TA will get you sweaty and drunk just by listening to them.

The album opens with their all-purpose anthem, "Fear and Loathing in Mahwah, NJ," a song that starts out soft and hushed but comes alive with a hoarse shout of "[...] You!" What follows throughout the rest of the album is all breakneck speed, go-for-broke rock n' roll excess, the very example of a band with too many ideas let loose in the studio for the first time. It's all a little exausting, but one supposes it was meant to be. To extend the Boss comparison, imagine a show that was all "Born To Run" and "Thunder Road" but no "I'm On Fire." Even the relatively slow "No Future, Part One" leads into the faster tempo of the cheekily-titled "No Future, Part Two: The Day After No Future." They're not stopping to catch a breath, so why should you?

Some random notes: the album's name is taken from an episode of "Seinfeld" (you know, the one about "Festivus"). The album includes brief end-of-song readings from the original Shakespeare play (of course) and a bit from Camus' "The Stranger" (in a song called "Albert Camus"--literature classes in New Jersey are apparentely good). The band's self-titled song is the best thing The Clash never wrote. Singer Patrick Stickles does not, contrary to what many have said, sound like a screaming Conor Oberst--he's closer to an American Joe Strummer. The only real question is: will the band have as long or rich a career as Strummer? I for one can't wait to find out.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
I thought they were Irish 4 Jun. 2009
By Scott Fisher - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Loud. Distorted. Melodic. This is the post-punk album I needed at this point in my life. It makes me want to pick up the guitar again and change the world, using three chords and lots of literature references.

Hopefully these folks with survive long enough to give us a few more. Truly inspirational.
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