The Age of Reason and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Age of Reason has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Expedited shipping available on this book. The book has been read but remains in clean condition. All pages are intact and the cover is intact. Some minor wear to the spine.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Age of Reason Paperback – 1 Jan 2004


See all 159 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 1 Jan 2004
£7.99
£1.61 £0.80
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
£6.66
£7.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Age of Reason + The Rights of Man (Dover Thrift Editions) + Common Sense (Dover Thrift Editions)
Price For All Three: £17.48

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Dover Publications Inc. (1 Jan. 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0486433935
  • ISBN-13: 978-0486433936
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 13.3 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 11,416 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

About the Author

Thomas Paine, born in Thetford, England, 29 January 1737. Passed on on 8 June 1809, New York City, U.S.) was an English pamphleteer, revolutionary, radical, classical liberal and intellectual. Born in Great Britain, he lived and worked there until the age of 37, when he migrated to the American colonies just in time to take part in the American Revolution. His main contribution was as the author of the powerful, widely read pamphlet, Common Sense (1776), advocating independence for the American Colonies from the Kingdom of Great Britain, and of The American Crisis, supporting the Revolution. Later, Paine was a great influence on the French Revolution. He wrote the Rights of Man (1791) as a guide to the ideas of the Enlightenment. Despite an inability to speak French, he was elected to the French National Assembly in 1792. Regarded as an ally of the Girondists, he was seen with increasing disfavour by the Montagnards and in particular by Robespierre. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 37 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 20 Dec. 1998
Format: Paperback
This is one of the most thought prevoking books I have ever read. Paine is a master at putting together the most logical reasoning. He compels an individual to think for himself.
Many will find Paine's arguments about religion, Christianity and the other major religions disconcerting. He believed in God but not the god depicted in the Scriptures, not the god of the Isrelites, the god that slew the enemies of Isreal.
He challenges the reader not to accept doctrine and dogma without exposing it to the application of reason. His arguments are powerful and not for the weak of heart. In a way he leaves you with a feeling of sadness, realizing that an eternal life hearafter is probably no more than wishful thinking.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
44 of 45 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 29 Dec. 2000
Format: Paperback
A masterpiece of freethinking. The first part of Paine's essay provides some general comments on religion - he author believed devoutly in God, but rejected the claims of the established churches to some special knowledge of the nature of God. The core of his arguament is that any religion based on a supposed revelation of the Word of God to individuals is both spurious and blasphemous. The Jews claim that their Word of God was given to Moses, the Christians have Jesus and Saint Paul and the Moslems have Muhammed. However, when one of these individuals tells us that the Word of God has been revealed to them, we have only their word for it - to the rest of us it is not the Word of God, but the word of a man, and what could be more blasphemous that placing the word of a man on a par with that of God? Paine invites us instead to rationally consider the nature and character of God through His creation. One does not have to agree with his conclusions to appreciate his application of reason to the subject, and if you do not agree with his view of God, come to your own, based not on faith but on reason.
The second part of the book is a more specific attack on the belief in the truth of the Bible, and it is this that has earned him most bile from Christians. Paine analyses the text for factual and chronological inconsistencies, and shows that most of the books of the Old Testament could not have been written until centuries after the events they claim to describe, and are therefore no more reliable as history than Homer's Illiad. Moreover, the Old Testament claims that the Jews came upon whole races of people who had done them no harm, that they smote them with the edge of the sword, that they spared neither age nor infancy, and that these acts were comitted under the express command of God.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Alan on 14 Oct. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There can be no doubt that The Age of Reason is is a supreme work of reason and clarity of thought that is just as relevant today as when it was written two centuries ago. It is the product of a great and enlightened intellect. I believe it should be widely read, especially by those who engage in the faith vs. science debate or anyone who values good writing.

Unfortunately this Dover edition is poorly produced on poor quality paper and in a font that is not easy on the eye. More importantly it is incomplete containing only Parts I and II, Part III being totally absent. I cannot recommend it.

A much better edition, also available form Amazon, is published by Truth Seeker Company with an introduction by Bob Johnson, it is better printed with a more substantial feel to it. In addition to Part III it includes all of Paine's known essays and correspondence regarding God, Deism, the Bible and Theology. It is more expensive but is much better value for the money.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 19 July 1997
Format: Paperback
After the American Revolution, Tom Paine went to England on a hopeless
quest to promote an invention. While there he was inspired to write The
Rights of Man, his greatest political tract. The British government took
offense, and Paine only just escaped arrest for sedition, crossing the
channel to revolutionary France. The French, whose own revolution owed no
small debt to his writings, gave him a hero's welcome, but not much time
passed before he fell out of favor with the revolutionary government there.
Aging, ill, and out of favor, his mind turned to philosophy and he began to
put down "my thoughts upon religion." He sets forth two themes at the
outset. First, contradicting the modern notion that he was an atheist, he
wrote, "I believe in one God, and no more; and I hope for happiness beyond
this life. I believe in the equality of man; and I believe that religious
duties consist in doing justice, loving mercy, and endeavoring to make our
fellow creatures happy." But a second theme dominates most of the book: "I
do not believe in the creed professed by...the Protestant church, nor by
any church that I know of. My own mind is my church. All national
institutions of churches, whether Jewish, Christian or Turkish, appear to
me no other than human inventions, set up to terrify and enslave mankind,
and monopolize power and profit." And with that he deployed the full power
of one of the most amazing rhetorical voices ever raised, with no smaller
aim than to destroy the credibility of all religion, and especially that of
the Christian denominations.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback