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The Age Of The Understatement
 
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The Age Of The Understatement

19 April 2008 | Format: MP3

£6.69 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £6.90 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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3:09
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2:28
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2:40
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2:22
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 17 April 2008
  • Label: Domino Recording Co
  • Copyright: 2008 Domino Recording Co Ltd
  • Total Length: 35:07
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002PJ7JMQ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (64 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 17,414 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

40 of 41 people found the following review helpful By B. Wright VINE VOICE on 22 April 2008
Format: Audio CD
This is a very solid album, surprisingly good considering it's only a 'side project'. You don't need to be an Arctic Monkeys or Rascals fan to appreciate it, though if you don't like Alex Turner's voice then it won't be for you; he takes on the majority of vocal duties.

Full of (mostly) subtle orchestration and vocal harmonies, it sounds at times quite like the music you'd expect to find in a movie, perhaps a Bond soundtrack (listen to the intro to 'In My Room' and you'll understand). Most of the tracks have a frantic, energetic pace to them, particularly the title track and 'Black Plant'. Imagine the Arctic Monkeys, playing acoustically with an orchestra backing them and you've probably got a decent idea of the sound. The album is just as good when they slow the songs down and trade vocals, like in the brooding 'I Don't Like You Anymore'. It's more 'mature' and serious than anything they've released though, with the lyrics simpler and less wordy than Alex's usual fare. It's not particularly upbeat, all of the songs are quite dark and moody (though 'Meeting Place' gives a welcome respite from this, if not with the lyrics, at least with a more cheerful sound).

This probably won't be as well received as an Arctic Monkeys album, but it's just as good. There's a further depth to it that is lacking sometimes from their normal work, and it's nice to see two artists doing something experimental and different. The title is well chosen; the album is quite understated, definitely one that will grow the more times you listen to it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By pjr VINE VOICE on 24 May 2008
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I will be honest and say that I don't know The Rascals but I am all too familiar with the precocious talents Alex Turner of Arctic Monkeys fame. Side projects of this type could be dismissed as mere vanity projects. Taking inspiration from the epic soundscapes of Scott Walker's quartet of albums from the 60's should be ambitious beyond reach.

It isn't and isn't so for a number of reasons. Firstly Turner writes wonderfully taught lyrics and here they are given a different setting which seems to make them soar. He also adds some darker tones to his writing which suit the mood well. Musically the wish to make something akin to Scott Walker's album works and this is largely due to the pretty much unhearalded talents of Owen Pallett who, at 21, has already made a name arranging strings for Arcade Fire and Beruit. He emulates the sweeping strings of Wally Stott (Walker's arranger) wonderfully. His work is quite literally the highlight of the record and hopefully this will help elevate his band Final Fantasy into the public conciousness.

The sound is very 60's and fans of the likes of Scott Walker, John Barry and countless other 60's icons will find much to enjoy in this. The production is wonderfully executed and adding the merest hint of echo to Turner's voice really sets the mood of songs. It's not really going to set the fans of the Monkeys alight as this is something quite different.

It is ambitious and sumptuous and rarely hits anything short of its desired for hieghts. Picking out individual highlights is hard as each one of the tracks is a joy. Here's hoping there's more from this trio of prodigiously talented individuals. One of the highlights of the year.
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29 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Tony Floyd VINE VOICE on 23 April 2008
Format: Audio CD
Wow, what an album. These guys are 22. I'm an old fart in my 40s. But I love this record. It's a beautiful headrush of pleasure. The Arctic Monkeys I can take or leave, probably because my ears need a break from staccato guitars and that trebly punky thing. But this is a bold and exhilarating record. I suppose it is Scott Walker-ish (think Seventh Seal) and James Bond-ish (think Chris Cornell's Casino Royale theme song) and Arctic Monkey-ish (Alex Turner's distinctive vocals) but Alex and Miles have done their influences proud and can easily stand up there with the people who served as their inspiration. The first 4 tracks come rushing out of the speakers backed up with a breathless and soaring orchestral accompaniment that is so bombastically over the top you can only grin at its sheer joie de vivre (did I really say that?). Thereafter the quality control wobbles a bit, though I'd say it's only a couple of tracks that are not that great, but things rapidly improve again and the album ends on another, though less thunderous, high.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By P. Frizelle on 15 Feb. 2012
Format: Audio CD
This album really surprised me as I was expecting something that sounds a lot like the Arctic Monkeys. But, the record instead sounds symphonic, epic and majestic instead.

Nevertheless, there's still a poppy, catchy side to the music that naturally reminds listeners of the Arctic Monkeys and the Little Flames.

Alex Turner's voice highly articulate style doesn't always suit this kind of music and hence Miles Kane the last authentic hero from Liverpool. If someone finds Scott Walker's or The Corals glorious music because of this album, Last Shadow Puppets have done their job.

Alex Turner and Miles Kane decided to form the side-project The Last Shadow Puppets after both expressed an affinity for the baroque pop stylings of the 60s while touring together in 2007. Depending on your perspective, it's either an attempt to update the highly orchestrated sound or pure retro pastiche and while The Last Shadow Puppets would prefer to be seen as doing the former, it too often ends up being the latter.

The problem is that this is baroque pop made by lads, for lads and consequently doesn't have any of the emotional resonance, romanticism or depth that you would get from a Scott Walker. Ultimately, is its greatest weakness as neither Kane nor Turner has enough experience, emotional maturity or a subtle enough hand to use the drama of the arrangements as anything more than window dressing. After three or four tracks, the orchestration and heavily echoed vocals start to feel like obligatory reverence to the source material.

On a positive note, apart from two tracks, most run under three minutes, giving the album a brisk pacing, and the songs bristle with an energy that's not generally associated with baroque pop.
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