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The Adventures of Tintin: Black Island Paperback – 30 Apr 1975


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Product details

  • Paperback: 62 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers (30 April 1975)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0316358355
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316358354
  • Product Dimensions: 22.2 x 0.6 x 29.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,795,635 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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35 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Sami on 30 Jun 2008
Format: Hardcover
The Black Island was published as a black & white book in 1938, then in 1943, the very same B/W drawings were coloured with only one frame added. Then, in 1965, on his British publishers' request, Herge had to re-draw the whole book modernizing and changing every frame, creating the common book we grew up with. In this 1943 original, you get to see the all-Herge vision of Tintin's deeds in Britain, unlike the 1965 version which was largely drawn by his associates in "Studio Herge".

This adventure was created while the clouds of war were gathering over Europe, and Herge did not miss that. Tintin goes to Britian after a money counterfeiting gang headed by a man called Müller, and although Müller's nationality was never mentioned candidly in the book, you do not need much guess work to figure it out. History tells us that after the end of WW2, documentation of a massive operation to forge British money by the Nazis was discovered. Their aim was to destroy the British wartime economy, an aim they never achieved. For Herge to draw this book before WW2 even began, just shows the kind of visionary he was.

Released with this book are 5 other exact copies of first colour editions: "Cigars of The Pharaoh", "Broken Ear", "King Ottokar's Sceptre", "Tintin in America", and "Blue Lotus". Those five are slighty to significantly different than the common ones you already have. Real hardcore Tintin fans should get the whole set of 6, but if you were going the get just one, it definitely should be The Black Island. 100% different, historically important, charming, and simply beautiful.
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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 4 Jan 2002
Format: Paperback
This is one of Tintin's best known adventures. The adventure begins in the South of England and carries on all across to an island off the North West coast of Scotland. The pictures are stunningly real and capture the greenery of England, the rocky cliffs of South Britain and a pretty fishing village in North of Scotland.
But this book is not just about scenaries the storyline is brilliant. One particular sequence where Tintin is about to be made to jump down at gunpoint from a high cliff is simply unforgettable. The encounter with Ranko is no less remarkable. The only bit that Tintin lovers might miss is the amazing Captain Haddock.
I am sure that readers of all ages will like to read this book over and over again.
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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on 16 Nov 2002
Format: Paperback
I do not really like the early Tintin adventures where there is a lot of slapstick and every other page our intrepid reporter hero is either holding a gun or having somebody hold a gun on him as much as I do the later adventures where the emphasize is on character humor and cultural details. However, "The Black Island" is certainly the epitome of this type of Tintin adventure. Hergé really pours it on pretty much from start to finish. This might be slapstick but it is nonstop slapstick from Tintin trying to stop the Thom(p)sons from arresting him to Snowy getting the better of a gorilla (but not a spider). Tintin might end up unconscious more often in this story than all of his other adventures combined. The beginning is simple enough. Tintin sees a plane land with engine trouble. Noticing it is an unregistered plane he offers to help and is immediately shot (do not worry, boys and girls, the bullet only grazes his ribs). Of course Tintin wants to get to the bottom of this mystery but it is hard to collect clues when people are trying to kill you and you have no clue why. As you can tell from the cover illustration of "The Black Island" Tintin gets to wear a kilt, not to mention a bonnie bonnet as the titular piece of property happens to be in Scotland. This might not be the best Tintin adventure and there are certainly funnier sequences to be found down the road, but all things considered "The Black Island" has got to be the funniest of Hergé stories.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By EarlB on 10 Aug 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I'm a die-hard Tintin fan, from my early days and still am. Therefore, when they began translating the facsimile versions into English, my enthusiasm was reignited.
I bought the black-and-white versions of America and Cigars, and the French 1950 facsimile of Land of Black Gold. When I saw they had The Black Island in English, I went through pains to get it.
And how disappointed I was! There are hardly any differences as there are between the black-and-whites and the real books.
This is no fault of Herge, nor the translators, but of the publishers, since there were no translators! Each page, panel and frame is the same, only the art is older. Nothing is there that is absent in the new version, nothing is missing from the new version. And if that weren't bad enough, Egmont has gone out of their way to kill whatever minor differences there might be, because they didn't translate the facsimile edition, but merely took the text of the new version in English and applied it here. Thus differences that I had expected to see - which I read about in Michael Farr's Tintin: The Complete Companion (Adventures of Tintin), don't exist in the english fax! For example, when Tintin jumps onto a railway car which is "Loch Lomond" in the new version but is "Jonnie Walker" in the old: this fax uses "Loch Lomond!"
The reason I gave 2 stars and not 1 is because, perhaps if you can read French, and buy the french facsimile, you'll find the unknown Tintin that one hopes to find!
Otherwise, this volume is of no value, even to the utmost Tintin enthusiasts: they will find nothing of interest whatsoever in the English facsimile, only perhaps in the french.
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