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The Adventures of an Aluminum Can: A Story about Recycling (Little Green Books) Paperback – 26 Jun 2009


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Frequently Bought Together

The Adventures of an Aluminum Can: A Story about Recycling (Little Green Books) + The Adventures of a Plastic Bottle: A Story about Recycling (Little Green Books) + I Can Save the Earth!: One Little Monster Learns to Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle (Little Green Books)
Price For All Three: £9.20

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Product details

  • Paperback: 24 pages
  • Publisher: Little Simon (26 Jun. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1416972218
  • ISBN-13: 978-1416972211
  • Product Dimensions: 20.3 x 0.3 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 13,042 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Peek into this diary of an aluminum can as it goes on a journey from inside a bauxite rock, to the manufacturing line, to the store shelf, to a display on a bookshelf, to a garbage can, and finally to a recycling plant where it emerges into its new l

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Beansmummy TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 5 May 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My year 2 son (aged 6 3/4) is doing a recycling topic at school, so we bought a few books to read at home on the subject. This is superb. It follows the story of an aluminium can (unfortunately spelled ALUMINUM in the American way), from the aluminium being mined, through processing and manufacture as a can, being filled with fruit, used, re-used as a baseball trophy (!), and then the process of recycling, ending up as a baseball bat!

It is very easy to read, with a glossary of terms at the back; most 6-7 year old Key Stage 1 children will have no trouble reading it. The story is told in diary format by the (very excited) can, and as such is entertaining as well as informative. It is great for older children too, and I found I also learned a lot (at 30-something). The cartoony illustrations are clear, appealing and detailed.

Aside from the heavily American style to the story, this is a great little book, and printed on 100% recycled paper, with vegetable inks, thus practising what it preaches. My son loved it and couldn't wait to take it to school to share with his class. We are of course now recycling with renewed enthusiasm, monitored all the time by our eagle-eyed little dictator!

I also recommend the Adventures of a Plastic Bottle, in the same series.The Adventures of a Plastic Bottle: A Story about Recycling (Little Green Books)
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Paul Holdsworth on 25 Oct. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I used this book in the classroom for a topic about the environment and recycling, it went down really well! I have used with children in Year 2 and Year 4/5, both enjoyed the book, used in slightly different ways.

I would recommend for any topic about recycling or showing where the raw materials actually come from.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By celinecoco on 9 Oct. 2010
Format: Paperback
I bought this book for my 5 year old son to teach him about the importance of recycling and why we do recycle. First of all I think it is important to mention that it is in american English which, I have to say, my son does not understand. But more to the point, I felt the message was a bit confusing. It does not tackle the importance of changing our ways and simply made recycling a happy-clappy process. On the opening page you can read 'The bulldozers got rid of all the trees, grass and rocks...' as if that was not a problem in itself!
I really feel the real issue is avoided: the way we consume and the impact it has on the environment. I would certainly not recommend this book to anyone.
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By S Blower on 4 Oct. 2014
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Excellent
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 46 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
What Message Is No-Name Trying To Tell Us? 21 May 2009
By Basil MacDougal - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I read The Adventures of Aluminum Can to a 5 year old boy. He was clearly uninterested. I loaned the book to two 8 year olds to read and they said it was a little dull.

Personally, I found the illustrations to be well done. The story, however, was a little troubling. You have a piece of animated aluminum, the main character...with no name. The author wants the reader to connect with the aluminum on a personal level, but that is hard to do since it doesn't even have a name.

The aluminum has made some diary entries (somehow) and this is how we follow his tale. Once extracted from the earth he eventually becomes a sheet of aluminum and then made into a fruit can. A girl (with no name) eats the fruit and then uses the can as a trophy for her baseball. He is so happy being a part of this little girl's life. Turn the page, and he is now in the back of an old truck headed to a sorting plant and then to a recycling plant. There, he is "shredded...melted."

He is made into another item. I don't want to spoil the ending, but let's just say that he is happy still. He is taken-in by another child where he hopes he "...don't get recycled for a long time."

What is the message this book is trying to convey?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Excellent Classroom Book on Recycling 23 April 2009
By Nicki Heskin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I read this book to my 6 and 2 year old as soon as I received it... I was pretty excited about the concept. The first thing I noticed about it was that it is printed on recycled paper, which is only appropriate.

The kids liked the book a lot, and it was lots of good information, but I think it's truly more appropriate as a classroom book then as a book to read to kids at home.

The book is told from the point of view of aluminum -- starting from a speck of alumina in the ground, onto its various forms during processing, and onto a can for fruit salad, before being again recycled into a baseball bat.

The cutest element of the story is how the can liked baseball when exposed to it as a fruit can, and the sweet irony of "reincarnation" as a bat. There are lots of cute little details that really do give the aluminum some personality, which is why, I think, my older daughter was attracted to it.

The thing that I didn't love as much was that the diary format, with many little sidenotes, make it hard to read in a flowing way. It's a great book for elementary-aged kids who can read on their own and explore the pages, I think. For a parent to read to a child, it's a little awkward, unless you are the type of parent that gets really into doing voices (I'm not).

The other thing that struck me oddly, is that for being an environmental group, it glosses over a bit the negative environmental impact of all the steps it describes in the processing (for example, the chemical baths, it describes). The ants that crawl on the can after the fruit salad "tickle" but the caustic chemical bath -- nothing. Yes, this would be a little much for a book aimed at kids anyway, but for an environmental book, it's a noticeable omission as you read past the word "chemical" several times.

The book does use a lot of science words and doesn't shy away from terms like aluminum oxide, bale and bauxite, which is nice if you want that in the book, and what makes it a nice classroom book. There is a little glossary on the last page of the harder words.

Overall, I did like it and would recommend if your kids are interested in the mechanics of recycling. [...]
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Green and Informative Entertainment 23 April 2009
By Nia - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Being about recycling and being made frm 100% recycled paper makes this quite the "Green" book. I actually learned something from the book, which I wasn't expecting. I didn't not know aluminum was made from bauxite rock or the process and chemicals required to make it what it is. It would be great book to use in a lesson on Earth Day. The illustrator did a great job on the fun, colorful picutres.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Fun and informative 22 Jun. 2009
By Laurie - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I've been giving this book rave reviews to all of my friends and family with young children. The pictures are bright and guaranteed grab the attention of youngsters, while teaching the importance of and the steps taken in recycling aluminum, using terms that are not difficult for children to understand. Every household with young children should have a copy of this book!
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Reduce, REUSE, and Recycle - the metamorphosis of one little can 30 April 2009
By H. Sapiens - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This book is one in a series targeted towards young (4-8) children and green living propaganda style. This book chronicles the transformation of a speck of aluminum into a glorious can of fruit (had to get the "snack healthy!" in there), an ant-riddled can, to a beautiful baseball bat in a very upbeat, first-person voice.

It is a bit overambitious for a group of 4's and a bit boring for the 8's, so I am going to say that this book is best for the kinder crowd. In simple, mainly accessible language we follow the can as it is prepared for being recycled and actually recycled. Most of the time we stress to kids they should use the green bins, but then tell them nothing of why or what it means. However, expect the can taking a "chemical bath" to get a few kids going. "What's that?" "Like a vat of acid?" Perhaps it could have been better explained.

Often in recycling programs, we forget about the reusing of items. Kids are pretty crafty little people, so I like the fact that the can briefly gets reused as a trophy stand. I deeply dislike the fact that the trophy stand/can is immediately covered in ants and mom makes her recycle the can. Perhaps the author could have thought this one out a little better. Used it for art? Used it for pens first? Or, she could have brought in the idea that first we must REDUCE - and had the healthy snack be served to the kids from a large warehouse sized can to the kids in reusable bowls.

So, this book did not hit the all 3 R's, and in all fairness it was meant to chronicle the process of recycling. In the meantime, I Can Save the Earth!: One Little Monster Learns to Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle (Little Green Books) from the same series for this age group, or Recycled Crafts Box for the slightly older crowd, which also includes craft ideas. For more comprehensive study of recycling pick up Recycle!: A Handbook for Kids or Recycling (True Books: Environment).

The construction of the book may be a topic of conversation itself. The book is printed with vegetable dyes, which you should be able to smell. It's not obnoxious, but definitely is unique.

I'm not overly impressed with the book, but I think it is one of the better offerings for explaining how recycling works to this age group. Overall, I feel like the book is only average, despite the topic being one that needs many more offerings.

Bottom line: I think at this age, kids deserve answers to the majority of their "why?'s", so I am pleased the author took on this challenge. All in all, it tried a tad too hard to construct a character-based story, when I think simply stating what's going on with fewer words would have been less distracting and more interesting for the Kinder-group.

EDIT: In an effort to clarify and talk about what the kids thought, I am adding this. I read it to a group of 4 to 5's, 1 eight, and 1 ten year old. There were just too many words for most of them to be able to sit through. The chemical bath part did pull back the Spiderman fans, so maybe I was remiss in dinging that since the kids liked it. The pages are very busy, with journal style writing (on lined paper). I do not think they were able to connect with the can on any level. That said - it was Earth week and they had been busy doing lots of recycling activities, so maybe they already had a lot of the information that would be new and interesting.

I am sticking to my opinion that the author should have supported all the 3 R's fully if she was going to do it at all. Compared to my other suggestions, across the whole age range (4-8) suggested, as a story line this book is average, and as great as I think the message is, the story line has to support it. Average is good, not great, but good.
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