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The Abominable Snowman [VHS] [1957]

4.4 out of 5 stars 45 customer reviews

Dispatched from and sold by stephensmith_426.
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£19.00 Only 1 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by stephensmith_426.

Product details

  • Actors: Forrest Tucker, Peter Cushing, Maureen Connell, Richard Wattis, Robert Brown
  • Directors: Val Guest
  • Writers: Val Guest, Nigel Kneale
  • Producers: Anthony Nelson Keys, Aubrey Baring, Michael Carreras
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: Dd Video
  • VHS Release Date: 5 May 2003
  • Run Time: 86 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00008WQ6G
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 336,058 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

Gun-runner Tom Friend embarks on an expedition in search of the fabled creature known as the Yeti, or Abominable Snowman. He is joined by botanist John Rollason, whose scientific curiosity is at odds with Rollason's aim to capture and commercially exploit one of the creatures.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
We've been pretty lucky in America during the past five years of the DVD boom. (I know DVD has been around twice that, but it's only the past five years the studios have started listening to you and I about what WE want on DVD) I've gotten to see more quality Hammer Studio releases of wonderful movies, like "The Abominable Snowman", then I ever did during the vhs era. And a lot of this thanks goes to AnchorBay Entertainment, who went out of their way to get permission to release them, in their original aspect ratio, and in the best possible shape they could find. This DVD is one of the gems of my collection.
The picture quality is stunning for such an old film. And to know that many of the outdoor and indoor Himalayan sets were put together in England is astounding. The sound is crips and clean. And the picture is animorphic Widescreen for those lucky enough to have a Widescreen TV.
If you don't know the story, briefly, Dr. John Rollason (Cushing) is a gentle, humane scientist working in the Himalayas with his wife and friend/co-worker, supposedly catalouging rare plantlife in a hostile region. We discover shortly that American explorer and exploiter, Tom Friend (Forrest Tucker) and his partner (Played by Robert Brown) are hooking up with Rollason for an expedition to find the one, true Yeti. Both men are driven, one by the purity of science and humanity, the other by his greed and hunger for fame. They are pushed to the limits in an hostile world that can kill at anytime. And when they come face-to-face with the Yeti, the clash of personalities no longer matters, because each man must now face his own fears alone with the only true weapons that will work; their strengths, and their weaknesses.
This was a pretty giant production for Hammer. And they handled it wonderfully, giving us B-Horror hungry fans something a giant step above flesh-eating monsters and alien invaders; they gave us an intellegent, thinking-man's adventure story.
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Format: DVD
This is not your average monster movie!

A convincing cast led by Peter Cushing, with Forrest Tucker to add appeal for the American market.

This is a very intelligent look at the Abominable Snowman legend. There was quite a buzz in the early 50's about conquering Everest, and seeing unidentified footprints high in the snowfields.

Here is where Hammer caught the public's imagination, with this low budget effort. But please don't be put off by the low budget bit, if anything it made the production more efficient at telling a good story, without the need to substitute the story for eye-candy effects.
I hope you take a look at this almost forgotten gem from the Hammer vaults.

An excellent anamorphic transfer, beautifully shot in B&W. Also included is a superb retrospective documentary with the legend Val Guest. All go to make this a worthy addition to any classic horror collection.
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Format: DVD
It seems that out of Icon's Autumn 2011 generally poor quality batch of releases, The Abominable Snowmen stands apart as being a perfectly reasonable quality DVD. The B&W picture is clean enough and is 16:9 enhanced 2.35:1, preserving the original aspect ratio. I didn't notice any colour noise or incorrect interlacing. There's a healthy level of grain and film dirt, clearly not remastered but nothing excessive - perfectly acceptable for a budget DVD release of a film of this age. The sound is clear.

I feel very satisfied at this DVD release of a classic Nigel Kneale story. Take note Icon - this is how they all should be done.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This review relates to the DD edition of this movie - a company which seems all but defunct at this stage. This is too bad because all their Hammer releases (specifically the two Quatermass and "The Abominable snowman") are miles ahead of what Icon did with these titles. The DD DVDs (that can still be found but which are getting increasingly expensive) are crisp, clear copies with very good commentaries by Val Guest, Nigel Kneale and/or Jimmy Sangster, and all hosted by Hammer guru Marcus Hearn. The commentary on "Snowman" by Val Guest is fun, informative, full of anecdotes (fascinating bit on Hitchcock). He is complemented by interventions of writer Nigel Kneale, who clearly did not see eye-to-eye with him on the picture, even if the writer had to acknowledge by the end that the movie was good!
And how good this movie is! Like Quatermass 2 it stands as a classic, with an environmental theme which has never been more accute than now, so needless to say that the pictture has not aged a bit. Cushing shows his versatility as an actor, and the film moves seemlessly from a monastery filmed at the small Bray studios to vast snowy landscapes at Pinewood through vast mountainscapes in the Pyreneans -- all great and credible alternatives to the Himalaya. As always with Guest, the so-called "monster" is understated, and "Snowman" demonstrates that the journey is often more rewarding than the destination. A great effort, highly recommended in this edition.
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Format: VHS Tape
"The Abominable Snowman of the Himalayas" finds botanist John Rollason (Peter Cushing) encounters American Tom Friend (Forrest Tucker) at a monastery and joins a sortie led by Friend to find the legendary Yeti. The crass American wants to bring the Abominable Snowman back as a carnival exhibit. However accidents, Friend's recklessness and the Yeti methodically reduce the membership of the expedition. Finally, only Friend and Rollason are left to face the Yeti. This 1957 film was one of the earliest Hammer pictures, made just before "The Curse of Frankenstein" put the studio on the map and created its signature style. The script by Nigel Kneale is actually adapted from "The Creature," a one-act teleplay broadcast in 1955 that also starred Cushing. As the creator of the Quartermass series, Kneale's scripts for "The Quartermass Experiment" (a.k.a. "The Creeping Unknown") and "The Enemy from Space" (a.k.a "Quartermass II") had laid the foundation for Hammer's future success. Again director Val Guest was brought in to work behind the camera. Kneale's script is first rate and suffers only at the end when the confrontation with the Yeti fails to meet our heightened expectations. Guest's direction is limited because the set for the Himalayan mountainside was on the studio's back lot, intercut with stock footage of mountaineering that fails to convey any sense of reality. Cushing's performance is solid, as you would expect, and he works well off the blustery Tucker, who gets to ham it up as the high-handed American. This DVD includes audio commentary by Guest and Kneale, the original theatrical trailer, and the Peter Cushing segment from "World of Hammer."
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