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The A26 Paperback – 11 Feb 2013


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Product details

  • Paperback: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Gallic Books (11 Feb 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1908313161
  • ISBN-13: 978-1908313164
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 0.9 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 129,783 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Pascal Garnier was a talented novelist, short story writer, children's author and painter. From his home in the mountains of the Ardèche, he wrote fiction in a noir palette with a cast of characters drawn from ordinary provincial life.

Though his writing is often very dark in tone, it sparkles with quirkily beautiful imagery and dry wit. Garnier's work has been likened to the great thriller writer, Georges Simenon. His noirs are published in English by Gallic Books.

Praise for Pascal Garnier:

'A brilliant exercise in grim and gripping irony, it makes you grin as well as wince.' The Sunday Telegraph

'Often bleak, often funny and never predictable.' The Observer

'Garnier's take on the frailty of life has a bracing originality.' The Sunday Times

'For those with a taste for Georges Simenon or Patricia Highsmith, Garnier's recently translated oeuvre will strike a chord.' The Independent

'This is tough, bloody stuff, but put together with a cunning intelligence.' The Sunday Times

Product Description

Review

A brilliant exercise in grim and gripping irony, it makes you grin as well as wince. --The Sunday Telegraph

This is tough, bloody stuff, but put together with a cunning intelligence. --The Sunday Times

For those with a taste for Georges Simenon or Patricia Highsmith, Garnier's recently translated oeuvre will strike a chord -- --The Independent

This is tough, bloody stuff, but put together with a cunning intelligence. --The Sunday Times

For those with a taste for Georges Simenon or Patricia Highsmith, Garnier's recently translated oeuvre will strike a chord --The Independent

About the Author

Pascal Garnier is a leading figure in contemporary French literature, in the tradition of Georges Simenon. He lived in a small village in the Ardèche devoting himself to writing and painting. Pascal Garnier died in March 2010.

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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Raven TOP 500 REVIEWER on 20 Feb 2013
Format: Paperback
I must confess to having a bit of a penchant for what I dub `bijou but perfect' reads- books that come in at less than 150 pages, invariably foreign fiction in translation and that reveal a whole world of human experience in such a condensed form. The late, great Pascal Garnier is one of my particular favourites with his amoral novelettes that plunge the depths of human sadness and frustration, and `The A26` is another perfect example of this.

Defying a straightforward classification of genre, I would loosely term this as a noir-esque thriller, but as the plot unfolds, I think maybe this is too simple a defintion. Ostensibly the plot is straightforward with Bernard, a man of mature years employed by the local railway coming to terms with the terminal illness eating away at him. Bernard comes to cope his own impending death by embarking on a murderous course of action. He lives with his sister Yolande, who not to put too fine a point on it is seriously mentally disturbed, having not left the house they share since 1945 when she was exposed as a Nazi collaborator and punished by the local villagers, whilst also trapped in the belief that the war is still on. She observes the world through a peephole, in the clutter and jumble of their ramshackle home, spending her days embarking on nonsensical flights of fancy, and venomous tirades about her persecutors with violent results. Her existence mentally in the past is made even more tangible when juxtaposed with the central motif of progress embodied in the building of the new road, marking the march of modernisation, and the sense of the world moving on without her.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ann Fairweather TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 27 May 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
This is the kind of book that puts me into a quandary when it comes to 'reviewing' them (Beside the sea by Olmi was another one) because there is no doubt that this is an excellent book yet to say that I 'enjoyed' it, is impossible. Frankly when I finished it, I felt nauseous and depressed. Well-written in a very simple but straight to the point prose, you get instantly sucked into a grotesque, noir, horrific world of two deranged siblings, an old sister, locked in her house all her life since her twenties, and her brother, with an 'outside' life, acting seemingly normal with colleagues and friends, but really a murderer at heart. It takes place in a dreary no man's land part of some northern France, and if you want utter gloom, that's exactly what you get. The ending reaches a climax of horror that would do well as a horror film indeed. So yes, Garnier is a good writer and this is a rather fascinating short novel, but be warned. 'Noir' here, is extra noir!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Anthony Holder on 25 Mar 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Gulped this down, for the almost poetic descriptive writing as much as the deeply disturbing journey into the psyche of the central character. Inspired me to read more by the same author, but two books were enough for the moment.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Storyline not as strong as "How's the pain" or "Moon in a dead eye", which were excellent. Worth reading though as Garnier is a master of noir and watching his characters descend into madness is like watching a car crash. He is one of my favourite authors.
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