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The 900 Days: The Siege of Leningrad Paperback – 28 Aug 2003


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Product details

  • Paperback: 672 pages
  • Publisher: Da Capo Press Inc; 2nd Da Capo Press Ed edition (28 Aug 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0306812983
  • ISBN-13: 978-0306812989
  • Product Dimensions: 22.8 x 15.4 x 3.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 40,990 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Harrison E. Salisbury is the author of American in Russia, Moscow Journal, and other books.

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COLD AND WIND, COLD AND WIND-THIS WAS SPRING 1941 in Leningrad. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By paul_olvhoj@hotmail.com on 14 Jan 2002
Format: Paperback
This book sets out to tell the story of the seige of Leningrad from the city dwellers themselves. Drawing on accounts from the city leaders, writers and playwrights it gives a real insight into the terrors that the population suffered. The book mainly concentrates on the winter of 1941-42, this being when the worst hardships were inflicted on the population, and does not spare the horror. Imagine trying to live on 200grams of bread a day ? In temperatures of thirty below freezing and with no electrical power ? It is a testament to the bravery of that city that they pulled through and continued life as normal as possible. The book also shows the political intrigue that surrounded any Soviet decision of Stalins reign - plotting, discrediting and murder where all part of the story and the epilogue is especially poignant in that the men who led the city in the 900 days were eliminated and their names wiped from the Soviet history books. My only complaint is that there are not enough maps showing the battle lines, making it difficult to imagine some of the battles, but that is only a minor complaint , this book is a must read on this terrible conflict alongside Beevor's Stalingrad.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 19 Nov 1997
Format: Paperback
It is a great book on a not-so-well-known subject. A really gripping depiction of the struggle and suffering in besieged Leningrad. Starting at a rather slow (read: too slow) pace, as the author presents the political situation before the German attack on the Soviet Union, and events leading to Leningrad's encirclement, the book proceeds to very graphic, horrifying description of the life under the siege. Road to Life accross Ladoga Lake, desperate attempts to feed the city's population, cases of cannibalism are just a few highlights of this great book. However, the book never looked at these events from the other site. Germans are just shadows looming over the city. We never got a chance to hear from them, to find out what it was like from their perspective. Another problem with the perspective: author makes it look like Leningrad was populated in 90% by artists. Writers, painters, composers, and their likes, crowd the pages of the book leaving little room for ordinary people. With all that said, it is a great book, very readable, and, at least to me, very enlightening.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 12 Oct 2000
Format: Paperback
This book provides a thorough and readable account of the build up to and the human consequences of the seige of Leningrad.It covers the military, polictical and social background to a subject which was closed to the West for so many years. The chapters on the human suffering and heroism are extremeely harrowing.The style of the book gives confidence of its authenticity and offers no judgements - allowing readers to draw their own conclusions.The book enables years of academic study to be accessible to all.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By John Hopper VINE VOICE on 16 Dec 2006
Format: Paperback
A thoroughly absorbing account of the privations suffered during this momentous part of WWII. It's remarkable that the author was able to gather so many accounts from ordinary people, given that it was written in the late 1960s when Brezhnev was reversing the moves towards openness introduced under Khrushchev. The book was officially criticised in the USSR as giving insufficient coverage to the role of the Communist Party in leading the besieged citizens' struggle. The only slight point of mild criticism of this great book might be the imbalance in coverage of the 900 days: the emphasis is almost all on the first winter of the siege when so many died of starvation, with the following two years covered very scantily.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 4 May 1997
Format: Paperback
"900 Days" is the compelling story of the most brutal & savage siege in modern history, that of the siege of Leningrad (St. Petersburg) by the German Army in Wold War II. The author, by way of personal interviews with survivors of the siege, manages to convey the horrific conditions & effects of the to the reader in a way few studies of history have been able to do. Eminently readable, "900 Days" is a terrible & gripping depiction of the event that laid bare the soul & heart of a nation.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 25 July 1999
Format: Paperback
Reading the great new WWII novel, The Triumph and the Glory" triggered in me an interest in World War II, especially the fighting on the Eastern Front. I asked around and was told Salisbury's "900 Days" was one of the best accounts of the Leningrad fighting, and after reading it agree, with the slight complaint that it concentrates almost wholly on the situation inside the besieged city. It is more a story of the citizenry of Leningrad and their ordeal than in the military aspects of the siege.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Like Russia at War, The 900 Days is written by a US journalist, shortly after the end of WWII. It is untainted by Cold War rhetoric and propaganda. The siege of Leningrad was a very grim episode in Russia/the Soviet Union's very grim experiences of WWII. The book focuses on the human element of the siege, what the people endured. It is well written and compelling. Anyone who hasn't heard of the siege of Leningrad, should read this book and think about why today's Russians are so alarmed about the rise of neo-Nazism in Europe.
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