The 1975

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Biography

10 years since they first met in a classroom in Wilmslow, The 1975 are ready to unveil their eponymous debut album. A collection of memories, overheard conversations, and snapshots in time. The 1975 is a love letter to youth, played out in bold and brash Technicolor. The 1975 make pop music, but not as you know it.
Matthew Healy, (vocals/guitar), Adam Hann (guitar), George Daniel (drums) and Ross MacDonald (Bass) started making music together aged 14. “Our musical vocabulary is 100% the same because we grew up listening and playing music together. We can't live without one another, we can't ... Read more

10 years since they first met in a classroom in Wilmslow, The 1975 are ready to unveil their eponymous debut album. A collection of memories, overheard conversations, and snapshots in time. The 1975 is a love letter to youth, played out in bold and brash Technicolor. The 1975 make pop music, but not as you know it.
Matthew Healy, (vocals/guitar), Adam Hann (guitar), George Daniel (drums) and Ross MacDonald (Bass) started making music together aged 14. “Our musical vocabulary is 100% the same because we grew up listening and playing music together. We can't live without one another, we can't work without one another,” frontman Matthew says, “You know, I’ve seen George every day, minus 13 days in the past 10 years. When he dove straight through a portaloo during our first rehearsal I thought – yes, this is the guy I want to spend the rest of my life with."
Over the next few years they’d play in the guise of Talkhouse, The Slowdown, Bigsleep, and Drive Like I Do, setting up in old people’s homes, on grimy pub stages or invading friend’s living rooms. They spent their time collecting musical influences that would later inform their hybrid sound, “When we started out we were crazy little kids. We sounded like the Dead Kennedys one day, the next like Explosions In The Sky, but our love for music never changed. Music was always my life,” says Matthew. “Michael Jackson, Roberta Flack, Prince, Otis Redding, Wilson Pickett - black American music is what we were all brought up with, but when you're 14 it’s hard to create that so you just make loads of noise. Then when I realised we could do anything we wanted, everything changed.”
The tracks on the 1975’s album preceded the existence of the band as we know them now. Years of playing and writing meant that they’d built up a body of work, but as a band they still lurked in the shadows, waiting for the right time to properly introduce themselves to a world outside of Manchester. It wasn’t until spring 2012, that the band started to drip feed music online, releasing their EPs, Facedown, Sex, Music For Cars and IV, much like trailers for the full record. The band’s online popularity was immediate, and thanks to the moody string of black and white films that accompanied each song, YouTube views grew and so did their frenzied fan base. In the autumn of 2012 the band moved to Liverpool to record their album at the Motor Museum, a studio known for spawning the likes of Oasis’ Definitely Maybe, and Arctic Monkey’s Favourite Worst Nightmare and Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not. Produced by drummer George, frontman Matthew and Mike Crossey (Arctic Monkeys, Foals), The 1975 reprises the turbulent melancholia of their first EPs, while kicking up a storm in other areas: electronic textures ripple in-between massive pop hooks, 80s yacht rock is filed next to breathy ambience. With culture at their fingertips, the finished product is a reaction to the smash and grab nature of the digital age - the constant accessibility to any genre of music throughout their teenage years has meant the band create an extraordinary, post-internet inspired vision.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

10 years since they first met in a classroom in Wilmslow, The 1975 are ready to unveil their eponymous debut album. A collection of memories, overheard conversations, and snapshots in time. The 1975 is a love letter to youth, played out in bold and brash Technicolor. The 1975 make pop music, but not as you know it.
Matthew Healy, (vocals/guitar), Adam Hann (guitar), George Daniel (drums) and Ross MacDonald (Bass) started making music together aged 14. “Our musical vocabulary is 100% the same because we grew up listening and playing music together. We can't live without one another, we can't work without one another,” frontman Matthew says, “You know, I’ve seen George every day, minus 13 days in the past 10 years. When he dove straight through a portaloo during our first rehearsal I thought – yes, this is the guy I want to spend the rest of my life with."
Over the next few years they’d play in the guise of Talkhouse, The Slowdown, Bigsleep, and Drive Like I Do, setting up in old people’s homes, on grimy pub stages or invading friend’s living rooms. They spent their time collecting musical influences that would later inform their hybrid sound, “When we started out we were crazy little kids. We sounded like the Dead Kennedys one day, the next like Explosions In The Sky, but our love for music never changed. Music was always my life,” says Matthew. “Michael Jackson, Roberta Flack, Prince, Otis Redding, Wilson Pickett - black American music is what we were all brought up with, but when you're 14 it’s hard to create that so you just make loads of noise. Then when I realised we could do anything we wanted, everything changed.”
The tracks on the 1975’s album preceded the existence of the band as we know them now. Years of playing and writing meant that they’d built up a body of work, but as a band they still lurked in the shadows, waiting for the right time to properly introduce themselves to a world outside of Manchester. It wasn’t until spring 2012, that the band started to drip feed music online, releasing their EPs, Facedown, Sex, Music For Cars and IV, much like trailers for the full record. The band’s online popularity was immediate, and thanks to the moody string of black and white films that accompanied each song, YouTube views grew and so did their frenzied fan base. In the autumn of 2012 the band moved to Liverpool to record their album at the Motor Museum, a studio known for spawning the likes of Oasis’ Definitely Maybe, and Arctic Monkey’s Favourite Worst Nightmare and Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not. Produced by drummer George, frontman Matthew and Mike Crossey (Arctic Monkeys, Foals), The 1975 reprises the turbulent melancholia of their first EPs, while kicking up a storm in other areas: electronic textures ripple in-between massive pop hooks, 80s yacht rock is filed next to breathy ambience. With culture at their fingertips, the finished product is a reaction to the smash and grab nature of the digital age - the constant accessibility to any genre of music throughout their teenage years has meant the band create an extraordinary, post-internet inspired vision.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

10 years since they first met in a classroom in Wilmslow, The 1975 are ready to unveil their eponymous debut album. A collection of memories, overheard conversations, and snapshots in time. The 1975 is a love letter to youth, played out in bold and brash Technicolor. The 1975 make pop music, but not as you know it.
Matthew Healy, (vocals/guitar), Adam Hann (guitar), George Daniel (drums) and Ross MacDonald (Bass) started making music together aged 14. “Our musical vocabulary is 100% the same because we grew up listening and playing music together. We can't live without one another, we can't work without one another,” frontman Matthew says, “You know, I’ve seen George every day, minus 13 days in the past 10 years. When he dove straight through a portaloo during our first rehearsal I thought – yes, this is the guy I want to spend the rest of my life with."
Over the next few years they’d play in the guise of Talkhouse, The Slowdown, Bigsleep, and Drive Like I Do, setting up in old people’s homes, on grimy pub stages or invading friend’s living rooms. They spent their time collecting musical influences that would later inform their hybrid sound, “When we started out we were crazy little kids. We sounded like the Dead Kennedys one day, the next like Explosions In The Sky, but our love for music never changed. Music was always my life,” says Matthew. “Michael Jackson, Roberta Flack, Prince, Otis Redding, Wilson Pickett - black American music is what we were all brought up with, but when you're 14 it’s hard to create that so you just make loads of noise. Then when I realised we could do anything we wanted, everything changed.”
The tracks on the 1975’s album preceded the existence of the band as we know them now. Years of playing and writing meant that they’d built up a body of work, but as a band they still lurked in the shadows, waiting for the right time to properly introduce themselves to a world outside of Manchester. It wasn’t until spring 2012, that the band started to drip feed music online, releasing their EPs, Facedown, Sex, Music For Cars and IV, much like trailers for the full record. The band’s online popularity was immediate, and thanks to the moody string of black and white films that accompanied each song, YouTube views grew and so did their frenzied fan base. In the autumn of 2012 the band moved to Liverpool to record their album at the Motor Museum, a studio known for spawning the likes of Oasis’ Definitely Maybe, and Arctic Monkey’s Favourite Worst Nightmare and Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not. Produced by drummer George, frontman Matthew and Mike Crossey (Arctic Monkeys, Foals), The 1975 reprises the turbulent melancholia of their first EPs, while kicking up a storm in other areas: electronic textures ripple in-between massive pop hooks, 80s yacht rock is filed next to breathy ambience. With culture at their fingertips, the finished product is a reaction to the smash and grab nature of the digital age - the constant accessibility to any genre of music throughout their teenage years has meant the band create an extraordinary, post-internet inspired vision.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

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