FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Thaw has been added to your Basket
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Thaw Paperback – 1 Jul 2009

11 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.99
£0.79 £0.01
£7.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Thaw + The Blue Handbag + The Letters
Price For All Three: £23.97

Buy the selected items together



Product details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Snowbooks (1 July 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1906727090
  • ISBN-13: 978-1906727093
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.9 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 431,639 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

Not yet published.

About the Author

Fiona Robyn is a writer and a blogger. She writes to help herself and other people to pay attention, and because she loves to. She writes a daily blog at www.asmallstone.com and a blog about being a writer at www.plantingwords.blogspot.com. She collects other people's small stones at http://ahandfulofstones.blogspot.com. She lives happily in rural Hampshire in the UK with her cats Silver and Fatty, and her vegetable patch.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
10
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 11 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Christine Bode on 30 May 2010
Format: Paperback
Stars: 5.0

British author Fiona Robyn has written a visceral, poignant, and often agonizing story of a young woman named Ruth White who at 32-years-of-age doesn't know whether she wants to be 33. Her small life is unfulfilling, seemingly void of love or meaning, and the death of her mother when she was a young girl haunts her still.

Her relationships are strained and awkward and her self-esteem is almost non-existent, even though she is well-educated and works as a microbiologist. Ruth is very good about saving her money and compulsive about keeping a tidy flat, in which she harbors her deep, dark secrets. Ruth has decided to give herself three months in which to make up her mind about whether she will commit suicide. In her daily diary entries we unravel the mystery of her past, bear witness to her present, and ultimately root for her future.

Robyn shares Ruth's tale in a first person narrative of magnificent prose. In a very clever form of self-marketing, she created a blog for the book that was launched on March 1, 2010 and posted an entry every day for 3 months. She also used Facebook to spread the word and created a remarkable reading event for those of us willing to take the ride with her. She is an excellent, courageous writer who has created one of the most honest and truthful characters I have ever come across. I care about Ruth more than I've cared for any fictional character in a very long time. She is embedded in my consciousness. Fiona Robyn has written something painfully beautiful.

She has also written about depression with much clarity and compassion.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By E. morgan on 3 Feb. 2010
Format: Paperback
The subject matter may sound dark, but this is in no way a depressing novel. Ruth's journey into understanding herself and her life is really moving and very original. I love the diary structure - it gives the narrative such a strong momentum that you can't put it down as you wonder what decision Ruth will come to. I admire the writing for the risk it takes in looking at this issue straight on, without any histrionics or self pity. Ruth is a great character, brave and uncompromising in the way she goes about looking at her life - it's a privilege to spend time with her.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Megan Taylor on 3 Feb. 2010
Format: Paperback
A vivid and delicious lyricism runs throughout Fiona Robyn's compassionate and compelling third novel.
`Thaw' tells the story of thirty-two year old Ruth, who `doesn't know if she wants to be thirty-three'. Her life is meticulously ordered, her relationships painstakingly detached - her loneliness devastating. `Thaw' is Ruth's journal, covering three months, as she decides whether or not she will take her own life.
Describing deep-seated loss and self-destruction, this novel is a necessarily darker, spikier read than Robyn's assured and sensitive debut, `The Letters' and yet the pacing of its diary structure makes it difficult to put down. Most of all, there is an authenticity about Ruth and her struggles that cries out for understanding, reaching far beyond the novel's pages.
It is this sense of empathy, combined with the beauty of Robyn's prose, which makes `Thaw' such a valuable and unforgettable book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By R. E. Carver on 26 Feb. 2010
Format: Paperback
I walked around this book for some weeks before picking it up last night and starting to read. I was a little afraid of the content, and what it might stir within me. However, once I had begun it, I simply could not stop reading Ruth's entries in her journal until I reached the very last one this afternoon - and I am so glad that I did walk with Ruth over the three months covered by the book, in which she struggles to decide whether to live or die.
Fiona Robyn creates convincing, complex characters that live in a richly depicted world, and her telling of their stories rings with authenticity. I was moved, amused, shocked, heartened and utterly gripped by Ruth's journal. And Ruth's decision? You'll have to read it and decide for yourself; I know what I hope she did on June 1st...
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Sassy TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 26 May 2010
Format: Paperback
Ruth doesn't know if she wants to live or die, so she gives herself 92 days to think about it, choosing to mull over her final decision by writing a diary. Some days are better than others, but just as she is picking herself up and dusting herself down, her father is in a car accident. Now they may never reconcile their differences. And her will to stop cutting herself wavers.

Day-by-day Ruth shares her suffering for all to see, as if when she dies it will be a kind of explanation for what she has done. Yet, unbeknown to her, her diary writing also becomes a form of her own therapy. Especially when she decides to "live each day as it's her last" because it almost is. Thinking along the lines that nothing really matters if she is going to die anyway is a surefire way to stop worrying about what others think while dealing with difficult situations. But it's a viscous circle. The more she enjoys life and the people around her, the more reasons she has to end it all -- before they leave her and it all goes terribly wrong.

Over time, Ruth learns so much about herself through other relationships. A couple of times she even proves to herself that good things do come when you least expect it, and from the strangest of places. But is it enough, really enough, to convince Ruth to change her mind when she gets to that last page of her diary and reaches her final destination, and must finally decide whether it is all worth it? Has she really got a life worth living for?

On one hand it starts as you would expect a book of this subject to, depressing and tinged, no loaded, with sadness. But it's not as simple as that. Thaw has much more meaning beyond the emotional and physical surface scars of which Ruth burdens herself with.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Look for similar items by category


Feedback