See Wishlist
Testimony Of The Ancients
 
See larger image
 

Testimony Of The Ancients

2 April 2007 | Format: MP3

£7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:55
30
2
0:30
30
3
4:02
30
4
0:30
30
5
3:40
30
6
0:28
30
7
4:46
30
8
0:31
30
9
5:21
30
10
0:59
30
11
3:50
30
12
0:32
30
13
5:50
30
14
0:24
30
15
5:22
30
16
1:14

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 16 Sep 1991
  • Release Date: 16 Sep 1991
  • Label: Roadrunner Records
  • Copyright: 1991 The All Blacks B.V.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 42:54
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001F0UGQC
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 141,367 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mr. D. G. Hazeldine on 18 Oct 2002
Format: Audio CD
One of the most unique albums I've ever had the pleasure to hear, 'Testimony Of The Ancients' utilises one structure which I have never seen again: the use of small interludes between every song.
There may be 16 tracks, but there are only 8 songs, with the other 8 being interludes between. These interludes showcase the developing interests in Jazz that the members of Pestilence were getting at this time. This interest would culminate in the next album 'Spheres' which would fully meld the two genres, something that Jazz musicians seem to be good at (melding...)
The interludes add that extra dimension of atmosphere to the album, and make it essential to listen to the whole thing at once: there's no way that you could get the same experience from this album any other way.
This keeps in line with many death metal albums, and also their own back catalogue: you can tell that it's Pestilence. Generally the instruments have a less thin production then on 'Consuming Impulse'. The low-end guitars have slightly more bass, and give some very intersting riffs and solo's. The drums also maintain their use of varying tempo's and arrangements. The bass has an even batter role here, making use of the interludes to get some solo work, which is much needed in this genre. The bass, interestingly, is only really used to accentuate the low-end of the guitars, and provide the link to the drums in Death metal, but some people like to try and show how much more can be gained from a more competant bass player...
Overall, a unique strangely atmospheric experience that must be taken all in one go. A taster of what was to come, and also a shame to know that it was their penultimate album...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. L. Legrove on 9 Jun 2008
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
....the classics are coming thick and fast. alongside 'clandestine' 'altars' this was the year of truly great stuff. if i'm right these all came out at the time -what a year! death metal with plenty of atmosphere and guitar wizardry, this was a mindblowing excursion in death metal.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 8 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Solid! 22 Oct 2003
By Dave - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I initially wasn't going to get this album. I loved the music on "Consuming Impulse", but I wasn't too keen on Martin Van Drunen's vocal style. It sounded too forced, like he was trying too hard. When I saw that Patrick Mameli was doing vocals on this one, I thought I would check it out. I was not dissapointed. He sounds a lot more comfortable and seemed more right for the job. In fact, he sounds so right here that it sounded eerily familiar to me, like I heard him before without having ever heard him at all, if that makes any sense. The songs are more well-constructed, and it is in this album that they experiment with the fusion, new age elements later found in abundance on "Spheres". The inclusion of interludes, which usually sounds like annoying filler when other bands attempt them, compliment each song so well that I think of them more as intros, providing a nice build up for the next song on the album. The lyrics on this album center around the occult, Necronomicon, sorcery type of subject matter, not uncommon in death metal or original, but it fits well. Slightly more progressive than Consuming Impulse. Not quite the progressive fusion of "Spheres." A good middle ground.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Awakening of the Ancients. 10 Dec 2004
By V. H. Ortiz - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
The concept behind "Testimony of the Ancients" reveals a great deal of interest towards the legacy of past entities, the album arrangement with a short interlude before or after (depending on perspectives) a song create an atmosphere enhanced by the subtle use of keyboards on the main songs. Such complex songs such as "Twisted Truth", "Testimony" and "Presence of the Dead" have interesting use of tempo and variation underlined by defined bass lines that play at their own pace. Guitars and Drums shows higher technicality than those of previous efforts and the vocals sound brutal and right at place.
A technical Death Metal Landmark with enough creativity and punishment that make the Ancients proud.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Testify! 3 Dec 2004
By Patrick Stott - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Whatever Pestilence produced after the stunning "Consuming Impulse" would always be judged against that album. That album had pushed the band to the forefront of the Death Metal explosion in the early 90s. In Martin Van Drunen, Pestilence possessed one of the most brutal voices in the world, and Patrick Mameli had shown himself to be a brilliant song writer within the Metal sphere.

However, Van Drunen left the band after "Consuming Impulse" to join Asphyx, so Mameli had to pick up the vocal duties, and his voice was no match for Van Drunen's guttural retch. So instead of trying to top "Consuming Impulse", Pestilence shuffled sideways a little. The bludgeoning weight of it would be difficult to match anyway, so the band showed their increasing skill and dexterity on "Testimony Of The Ancients".

While some bands played heavy for heavy's sake (take a bow Suffocation), Pestilence never neglected the fact songs are written to be listened to, not weighed. As such, the riffing and vocal refrains (it's a bit much to call them choruses) stick in your head. The band also showed a willingness to include traditional Metal influences, particularly in the soloing. "Twisted Truth" features a great example. Mameli had a great love for Jazz, and introduced a few rudimentary Jazz elements to the sound, producing some creative and at times unexpected riffs.

At the time this was recorded, Atheist and Atrocity were beginning to inspire other bands to explore more technical avenues within the bounds of Death Metal. Tony Choy, bassist for the legendary Cynic, and later Atheist, handled the four string duties on the album, and while there isn't the syncopation and choppy time signature changes of those bands, his playing is quite pliant and flexible, while sacrificing little of the bottom end.

It's not all experimentation and boundary pushing music though. "Lost Souls" is a good, old fashioned blast from the start. The half pace harmonic riffing features again, as it did on "Consuming Impulse", with the rhythm section and solos creating the illusion of speed.

One slight annoyance on the album is the 30 second interludes between songs. They mean very little, and don't really relate to the songs, and the four minutes or so of the album they take up would have been better served being filled by another song.

The overall impact of `Testimony Of The Ancients' is less of a crushing bodyblow than `Consuming Impulse', but it is an album with twists and turns not always noticeable at first. While not the instant classic of its predecessor, `Testimony Of The Ancients' shows Pestilence were about more than just being heavy, and on their day could play rings around a lot of other bands.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
A must-have for every serious death metal fan 28 Dec 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
If you are listening to Death Metal and you haven't heard this album, maybe it's time to switch to Britney..
Pestilence's "Testimonies.." is by all accounts one of the crucial Death metal from the golden age of this genre. It goes together with Death's "Human", Obituary's "Cause of Death," Sepultura's "Arise." It's a classic and you will love it.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
ahh...love it 13 April 2004
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
the feel of this album is amazing. imaginative, and overwhelming. excellent musicianship, and great hooks. i love the whole idea its a concept album too. i highly reccomend this album to any fan of metal. indeed, you must approach with an open mind, as you should with all things.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Product Images from Customers


Look for similar items by category