£22.99
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The New Testament of Our ... has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The New Testament of Our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ: published in 1526; being the first translation from the Greek into English Paperback – 31 Aug 2010


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£22.99
£19.21 £36.34


Product details

  • Paperback: 542 pages
  • Publisher: Nabu Press (31 Aug. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1178179028
  • ISBN-13: 978-1178179026
  • Product Dimensions: 18.9 x 2.8 x 24.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,032,962 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Bill Cooper is a Vice President of the Creation Science Movement in England. He also serves as an Adjunct Professor on the Master Faculty at the Institute for Creation Research School of Biblical Apologetics. He is the author of After the Flood (1995); Paley's Watchmaker (1997); William Tyndale's 1526 New Testament (old-spelling ed. British Library. 2000); The Wycliffe New Testament of 1388 (British Library. 2002); The Authenticity of the Book of Genesis (CSM. 2012 and Kindle); The Authenticity of the Book of Daniel (2012 Kindle); The Authenticity of the Book of Jonah (2012 Kindle); The Chronicle of the Early Britons (2012 Kindle), and Old Light on the Roman Church (2012 Kindle). He has also authored numerous technical articles on Creationism, Palaeoanthropology, Bible Apologetics, the Reformation, and the History of the English Bible. Graduating with Honours at Kingston University (England), he went on to obtain both his PhD and ThD from Emmanuel College of Christian Studies (Springdale, Arkansas) under the auspices of the College Dean, Dr Gene Jeffries, and the supervision of faculty member Dr James J Scofield Johnson. He lives in England, is married to Eileen (for 40 years now), has two daughters, numerous foster children, and three fine grandsons.

Product Description

Review

You can't keep a Good Book down..... --The Book Collector --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
Tys is the boke off the generacion off Jhesus christ the sonne of David, the sonne also of Abraham. Read the first page
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
10
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 13 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

49 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Rev. A.J.Carr on 11 Aug. 2002
Format: Hardcover
I purchased this Bible from the British Library as they published it for the 2000 millennium. It was a careful rewrite of the 1526 edition with corrected spellings taken from the 1536 edition. One problem for the modern reader is that there are no verses only chapter headings. It is therefore difficult to match verse by verse with other translations. The spelling is original but well worth reading. One helpful tip; Tyndale was a Gloucestershire man so try reading aloud in a Gloucestershire accent and it really does come alive!
W.R.Cooper who was given the task of reviewing the three remaining original manuscripts has done a remarkable job. On occasions Tyndale reads better than other translations. Take for instance the difficult word propitiation in Romans 3:25. Tyndale calls it 'seat of mercy.' In fact his translation was so good that the King James translators took large parts of Tyndale and transported it direct into their pages. I have compared every text of the Book of Romans against the New King James Version and Tyndale. There are whole sections of text where little if any changes are noticed. He uses words like 'favour' for 'grace' 'valour' for 'forbearance'.
Just to give one comparison with the New King James Version, we read in Romans 3:31
"Do we then make void the law through faith? Certainly not! On the contrary, we establish the law." NKJV
"Do we then destroye the lawe throw fayth? God forbid. We rather mayntayne the lawe.." (Tyndale original spelling.)
"Do we then destroy the law through faith? God forbid. We rather maintain the law." (Tyndale modern version by review writer.)
Notice the different use of words in this verse as an example where there are changes. Tyndale uses 'destroy' instead of 'void'.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Dr. C. Jeynes on 23 Dec. 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
In 1526 the English language was undergoing the "great vowel shift" and changing from the language of Chaucer (for whom we need a translation) to Shakespeare. At that time there was almost no English literature (Chaucer was an exception) and the general scholarly opinion was that English was too crude to say important things in. For such things the literate man needed Latin!

There was also great intellectual excitement, with the flames of the new learning being fanned by widespread printed dissemination. In particular, Luther had, in a highly subversive act, translated the newly published Greek and Hebrew originals of the Bible into German, with protection from the Inquisition by his local prince. England was too centralised to allow a similar thing, and besides, the so-called "Constitutions of Oxford" from 1408 were still in force: these made it effectively a capital offence to translate any part of the Bible into English, and were a response to Wyclif and his Lollards who were preaching a pure (and, it was thought, a highly seditious) Gospel from Wyclif's English Bible. But this manuscript (and very expensive) Bible was little more than a transliteration (into very poor English) from the Latin Vulgate text.

William Tyndale was one of the polymaths of the age, fluent in all the European languages, and in Biblical Greek as well, so much so that he could hear the Aramaic underneath the Greek of Matthew. He was also the only man in England to be fluent in Hebrew. And he believed that Everyman (and Everywoman too) should have access to the sacred text, the very words of God.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By bookwormsu TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 14 Sept. 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a lovely little book , the typeface is a bit small but a clear font, so I don't find it too much trouble to read bits. I am OAP so that explains it.

Having said that it is thrilling to hold in my hand the first edition since 1526, it gives a deep sense of history. It is well produced, a quality item with a book mark ribbon. Also a colour page of the original manuscript is included which you do really want to see. It is a scholarly work, but aimed at the general reader, and a delight to have in my house. If you read the words out loud they are inspirational, and as I am West Country, i understand Tyndale's Gloucestershire inflexions. It's amazing. the language springs to life, the language of ordinary people. Most of the King James version comes from this little volume but I think this original is livelier, more true. A real discovery.

I am not a Bible person, just a general reader and I came across this researching the invention of printing. I think Amazon deserve applause for having brought it to a wider audience than its previous outlet (The British Library). I hope there are big plans for it in 2026 when it will be 500 years old!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 18 May 2001
Format: Hardcover
This book provides the Tyndale edition in original spelling, which is an excellent resource. We are greatly indebted to the British Library and to the editors for making it available. By having the original spelling, we are able to get a true feel for the English of the period.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Wheezy warden on 24 July 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Prompted to buy after watching the Melvyn Bragg TV programme on Tyndale. The extra effort entailed in reading this 1526 version is well worth it, and the fact that it was a real labour of love shines through every page. Recommended for Bible scholars, lay readers and lovers of literature alike.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Look for similar items by category


Feedback