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Tescopoly: How One Shop Came Out on Top and Why it Matters Paperback – 29 Mar 2007


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Product details

  • Paperback: 372 pages
  • Publisher: Constable (29 Mar 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1845295110
  • ISBN-13: 978-1845295110
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 2.4 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (42 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 174,175 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

Creative and compelling (The Guardian )

'This book should be essential reading' Robert Watson, Head of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

'A compelling argument...find out you really owes what to whom' Tony Juniper, Friends of the Earth.



A well written and eye-opening account (News Letter)

Book Description

You can shop anywhere you like - as long as it's Tesco. The inexorable rise of supermarkets is big news, but have we really taken on board what this means for our daily lives, and of our children? This book analyses this subject. It states how the supermarkets (Tesco in particular) have brought: Banality; Ghost towns; and, a Supermarket State.

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Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

45 of 53 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Ralph Early on 10 April 2007
Format: Paperback
With a well crafted argument, supported by many references and illustrations, Andrew Simms explains that the supermarkets - and in the UK especially Tesco - are now a corrosive feature within our society. He tells of how their actions undermine our food culture and wider aspects of culture and society, how they destroy local and regional economies, and how they are endangering the environment and the planet in their quest for continuous growth in sales. He explains how the supermarkets and particularly Tesco have been able to achieve their frightening level of power within our society and, consequently, how our individual freedoms as consumers and citizens are being erroded. He also explains how Tesco (and others) have been able to get what they want for business growth by manipulating planning laws, bullying local councils, threatening farmers and suppliers, and eliminating competitors - the independent food stores - through unfair and anti-competitive practices. Amazingly, this has occurred with the full support of the Government. Essentially, Tescopoly tells of of the failure of the market economy and of how the supermarkets are being allowed to achieve monopoly status in the UK food marketplace and in many other countries.

Tescopoly is essential reading for students of marketing, business, management and retail management, and anyone with an interest in the workings of the food marketplace and the oppressive and destructive power of big business.
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By J. Smith on 29 Jan 2008
Format: Paperback
Blimey, did I read a different book? Judging by some of the unfair criticism I read here I can only assume TESCO must've bombed the site with reviews! I found 'Tescopoly' readable and enjoyable - so much so that I decided to stock it in the little North Yorkshire organic grocery store I run. Well, go and try to find an independent bookstore to buy it? Any luck?

Little business is gradually disappearing from the streets of our towns and cities, replaced by faceless uniformity... call me old fashioned but I just don't want to live that way. When all the little shops have gone there'll be no place for titles like this one. I can't see the supermarkets stocking it alongside the next installment of Jordans biography can you?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By m. dosa on 24 July 2013
Format: Paperback
a clearly critical look at tescos revealing lots of dodgy practises,how it helps to shut local shops replacing them with fewer jobs lower pay and less money going back into the community.how it blasts its way thru planning regulations.its general negative relationship with suppliers everything you need to know to make you shop less at this ugly shop
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By J. Coulson on 28 July 2008
Format: Paperback
Like many of this book's reviewers, I think Andrew Simms started out with a conclusion and then researched facts to fit it. The book is unashamedly biased, heavily anecdotal and at times descends into little more than a rant.

However, some of the wider arguments in the book are plain common sense, and difficult to dispute regardless of which reseach you choose: Supermarkets are too big and powerful; They use their power in abusive ways; They suck the life out of communities; The oil-dependent logistics behind their operations are a study in lunacy.

The book is well written and engaging. If you take it with the pinch of salt that any politically savvy reader should, you will enjoy it thoroughly and will probably still want to change your shopping behaviour afterwards.
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13 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Alison TOP 500 REVIEWER on 18 April 2007
Format: Paperback
The previous reviewers comments about the book are spot-on, it is an important read about the destructive effects of big business and would be a valuable read for students of business and marketing.

What the previous reviewer doesn't mention is how this book is important on a personal and ethical level. When I realised how ignorant I was about the wide reaching business practices of supermarkets like Tesco and Asda Wal-Mart, I really felt that I had to change the way I bought my food and where I shopped for many other items. I now shop at my local shops; greengrocers, butchers and bakers. It's a liberating experience and one that is important for our local community.

I'll be buying this book for many of my friends and family. It's important that they know about where they shop and the impacts their purchases have on their community and more widely across the world.
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By marcello on 11 Jun 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Not an academic book but a good read & eye opener to what the retailer get up to. Easy to read-
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22 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Dc Bassant on 10 Jun 2008
Format: Paperback
Before I begin, i must stress that i only managed to read the first 3 chapters. So this isn't so much of a review, more of a quick overview of why i couldn't finish it which might have an impact on certain potential readers.

As a Computer Scientist, i am well aware of good practice when it comes to experiments. One of the main rules is limit the bias, else many of your peers will not take your results as seriously as you might like. This is exactly what i didnt like with this book. Simms hates Tescos, and it shows.

One such niggly example is how he points out that the staff in the Tescos he visits for the purpose of his research arent as happy or bubbly as they are in the ads. I've worked in food retail, it's boring, don't hold that against them! Another example is how he claims he was "treated as a criminal" when his wife was asked not to push their child in a trolley at fast pace down an aisle (while he was researching i imagine) but in all honestly, if an accident occured then Tesco would be liable, so who can blame them?! The first chapters are riddled with examples which show his contempt for Tescos which for me, destroy his credabilty for providing a fair look at the situation, which in my opinion this book should be. If Tesco produced a highly biased overview of the main topics that surround them then i'm sure Simms would pick it to pieces, so asking for neutrality is only fair.

Sorry, this book just isn't for me. If however you don't like big multi-national corporations and want something to further your interest or provide interesting quotes or figures from the people involved then go for it. Simms at least does provide reference in his notes which is a plus.
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