The Terror in the French Revolution and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Terror in the French ... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: A few small marks to the page edges. Ex Library book with usual stamps and stickers. Minor Shelfwear. Previously water damaged, slight waving to the page edges. Over 2 million items sold. Fast dispatch and delivery. Excellent Customer Feedback. Most items will be dispatched the same or the next working day.
Trade in your item
Get a £0.58
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Terror in the French Revolution (Studies in European History) Paperback – 30 Jul 2010

2 customer reviews

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£16.50
£12.91 £3.28
£16.50 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Terror in the French Revolution (Studies in European History) + The French Revolution: Class War or Culture Clash? (Studies in European History) + The French Revolution: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions)
Price For All Three: £39.39

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £0.58
Trade in The Terror in the French Revolution (Studies in European History) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.58, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 152 pages
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan; 2 edition (30 July 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0230201814
  • ISBN-13: 978-0230201811
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 0.9 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 525,049 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

Praise for the first edition:

'This is a pithy, readable textbook which acts as an excellent introduction to the reams of material which have been written on the terror.' - History, Journal of the Historical Association

Book Description

A revised and updated short analysis of the causes and nature of French revolutionary terror, focussing on the years from 1789 to 1795

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Terror is a hard topic to get to grids with and this book is a very good introduction as well as a brilliant revision aid for undergraduates.

Some reviews on amazon are unfair on Hugh Gough. He may have a fairly liberal interpretation of the Terror but it is wrong to suggest he brushes over the atrocities - Simon Schama's highly emotive history is only one of many valid approaches to study of the Terror. Gough gets his facts right it is simply his delivery is less emotive. To infer he is no better than a Holocaust denier so ridiculous and show a complete lack of awareness of the wider historiography on the Terror. As an overview of the topic Gough actually gives a more balanced perspective on the Terror and its legacy than Schama.

The book is divided into short chapters on each period of the escalating crisis. The first chapter offer a brief overview of the historiography on the Terror. Gough does offer a short conclusion and synthesizes the views of both the Left and the Rights to give a very balanced interpretation of the Terror. As a revision aid this book is invaluable.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Sardonicus on 22 Sept. 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There are aspects of history about which any reader simply can't be neutral, like the Holocaust, the U.S.S.R or the crusades. The French Revolution is one such event. Even after two centuries, it divides historians along contemporary political lines between those who see it as generally a positive integer driven by democratic, socialistic and egalitarian ideals and those who regard it as largely negative and inevitably underpinned by totalitarianism, dictatorship and, above all, terror.

Hugh Gough is Emeritus Professor of History at University College, Dublin, and he sides firmly with the positivists. His short book - one hundred and twelve pages - concentrates only on the byproduct of the Revolution: terrorism or, more formally, The Terror. The book is not an original history; it's a summary and digest of previous historians' work. That's not a bad thing in itself since this book seems intended to have been a 'Beginner's Guide to The Terror'.

However, he seems so enthused by the ideals of the Revolution that throughout the book he systematically downplays the arrests without trial, the mob murders and the mass executions that were the fundamental features of The Terror. Every time he lists an atrocity, he attempts to rationalise the actions of its perpetrators as being some form of self-defence against 'counter-revolutionaries', 'emigres' or 'foreign interventionists'. This is a question of interpretation which is, of course, the prerogative of the author. However, at key points there seems to be wilful distortions of objective fact designed to cast a positive - or 'balanced' - gloss on the actions of the revolutionaries.

For example, on 10th August 1792, a mob attacked the Tuileries Palace and seized the king.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
Student Review 6 Jun. 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book deals with academic views of the Terror and also gives a chronological account of events, from 1789 to the fall of Robespierre in 1794. The author himself leans towards the more modern revisionist argument, that the Terror was the result of both circumstance and problems within the French political system. Hugh Gough balances the academic arguments and the account of historical events far more successfully than T.C.W. Blanning's "The French Revolution" from the same series, which becomes confused by presentation of conflicting arguments alongside the historical narrative, leaving me unsure which parts are reliable as evidence. That pitfall is avoided in this book.
Overall, the book gives a good, concise picture of events and facilitates further reading on the subject, containing an excellent bibliography, each entry evaluated by a short sentence. As a student I found the book most useful, making much additional reading unnecessary, and it was also quite inexpensive.
I should probably declare that I was lectured on this course by Prof. Hugh Gough in University College Dublin. Even so, for any students studying the French Revolutionary era this book would prove invaluable.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Good case study 29 April 2005
By Happy Ed - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is very interesting in detailing what went wrong with the revolution and how it turned against itself. The book deals in depth with the origin of the terror and its consequences. It would not be advised as a book for somebody looking for a general history of the revolution due to its narrow scope.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback