Ten Days That Shook the World and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Ten Days That Shook the World Paperback – Oct 2002


See all 75 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, Oct 2002
£19.19 £5.85

Trade In Promotion

--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.


Product details

  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Tantallon Press (Oct. 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0972042806
  • ISBN-13: 978-0972042802
  • Product Dimensions: 23.4 x 15.4 x 3.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 5,032,938 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Jason Parkes #1 HALL OF FAME on 20 Jan. 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm very surprised that nobody has reviewed this key work of the 20th Century; there are always many books one ought to read- but very few that one needs to read. This falls into the latter category.
John Reed is an important figure within US-socialism, stemming from an era almost erased from US-history- that saw radicalism espoused by many & was eventually crushed by such capitalist's as Henry Ford. When the spectre of "reds" resurfaced in the 50's, McCarthyism would crush these radical notions once and for all. Reed, came from a rich Portland family- like people such as George Orwell and Tony Benn he would reject his background- moving from the playboy he was depicted as in Dos Passos' USA to a bohemian poet/playwright- but always his most dominant skill was journalism. He famously covered the Mexican War of 1916, the First World War and in this classic book, The Russian Revolution.
In many ways, this book is close to fiction- it sits well next to the Dos Passos book mentioned above. As AJP Taylor suggests in his excellent introduction this is not an exact history- "Reed's book is not reliable in every detail. Its achievment is to recapture the spirit of those stirring days. As with most writers, Reed heightened the drama, and this drama sometimes took over from reality". This book does have the dizzying detail of Eisenstein's key cinematic works, or the flow of Dos Passos or even Oliver Stone's Nixon.
Reed captured the complex events of the Russian Revolution in a style that is both readable and informative, turning the myth as it occurred into journalistic prose. I think this is the definitive book on a key event of the 20th century- the chapters each supported by a complex of appendices.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Gerben Kappert on 4 Oct. 2003
Format: Paperback
This isn't holiday literature. Very heavy going. Not until the second chapter did I realise where all the footnotes where. In the back of the book. 71 notes consisting over 80 pages, it resembles any scientific book. I was continually using two papers to keep the pages and reading back and forth.
It is an eye-account of an American journalist of the Russian revolution. And as somebody who considers communism to be the best form of society, I had to read about it. It does confirm my opinion luckily, and don't get me started all you capitalists with your argument that it obviously doesn't work. I might be a pessimist here, but capitalism will collapse as much as the mutilated form of communism did in the Soviet Union and it's dependent countries.
The book is very detailed and very interesting to read, it gave me heaps of information on those very important 10 days, over 80 years back now. Anybody who wants to participate in any political discussion should read this as well.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Sam J. Ruddock on 14 Mar. 2007
Format: Paperback
In trying to delineate a consistent argument, historians tend to forget that what really makes a time and place are the sights, sounds and smells of ordinary lives. That is the wonder of this book. It takes you inside the Russian Revolution. Not from an intellectual or factual perspective, but from a real perspective of living through the events as they happen. In no other work can you see the graffiti on walls, feel the fervour of excitement emanating from the people around you, smell the chaos and determination of a society destroying itself from the inside out, so as to re-mould it on a new footing. The author was an American Journalist with Bolshevik leanings and his access-all-areas authority brings you into the melee of revolution in a way that secondary texts never could.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Richard Brock on 11 Aug. 2004
Format: Paperback
Every student of the Russian revolution should read John Reed's 10 Days that Shook the World. It brings home forcibly that History is not just an academic subject, but something that actually happens to people. However, they should also make sure that they read A.J.P.Taylor's excellent introduction first and make sure they take note of Taylor's warning that Reed was not a historian, but a journalist. This book was not produced in a library, with the author intent on checking and counter checking his facts, but hammered out in the "fog of revolution". Here no one knew what was going on, not the leaders of the revolution, nor their opponents, nor the people in the streets, and certainly not John Reed himself. As Taylor puts it: "the book is a contribution to history not an analysis composed afterwards".
Furthermore Reed is a biased source. It was no accident that the Communist Party of Great Britain first published this book in the UK, for Reed was a committed revolutionary, who wrote for the USA's foremost radical journal 'The Masses'. His purpose was not to produce a dispassionate account, but to inspire his readers and to further the cause of world revolution. Certainly Lenin believed that 'Ten Days that Shook the World' was a powerful weapon for world communism. As Trotsky commented, "Lenin, in his day, desired the incomparable chronicle of Reed to be distributed in millions of copies in all countries of the world".
Therefore the history student must regard this as a highly emotive, slanted, account. Nevertheless it has its own form of purity. Reed's sources are impressive. He knew, and talked to, a host of characters from all sides of the political spectrum and on all levels, both before and during the October Revolution.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback