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Templars: In Sacred Blood CD


Price: £14.15 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
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£14.15 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Templars: In Sacred Blood + Moonchild + Ipsissimus
Price For All Three: £39.99

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Product details

  • Audio CD (21 May 2012)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Tzadik
  • ASIN: B007N8PRC8
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 210,823 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
Listen  1. Templi Secretum 5:33£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Evocation of Baphomet 5:26£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Murder of the Magicians 4:14£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Prophetic Souls 6:20£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Libera Me 3:21£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. A Second Sanctuary 5:06£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Recordatio 3:53£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Secret Ceremony 9:15Album Only

Product Description

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Sordel TOP 500 REVIEWER on 27 Sept. 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I've repeatedly given the Moonchild trio of Patton, Dunn & Baron high review scores for their distinctive and enjoyable brand of Hammer Horror art metal. Here they are joined by John Medeski and the result, with the odd surprise or two along the way, is more of the same.

One of those surprises is that far from "songs without words' like the original Moonchild album, Templars has proper texts, with all the sort of dark, malevolent, arcane elements that have always been implied in earlier albums. To me, these lyrics border uncomfortably on laughable but - if you are coming to this from some of the murkier depths of Black Metal - they may be right up your street.

Musically, this is not as athletic an album as Ipsissimus or The Crucible. While those albums focused very much on the rhythm section, this album concentrates more on atmosphere and (dare one say it?) nuance. It's very far from an "ambient" album, but "Prophetic Souls" (for example) has some actual singing in it and the organ sets up a powerful contrast when the uptempo refrain kicks in. "Secret Ceremony" - the album's longest track - is so theatrical that it sounds like a possible backing track for an Alice Cooper stage routine.

As usual, the performances are all in tour de force territory, with Patton showing a range and fluidity employing a range of vocal effects that comes close to emulating his extraordinary work on Six Litanies For Heliogabalus.

Overall, though, I feel that this album has less to offer than Heliogabalus or Ipsissimus. If you've never heard Moonchild before, those are the albums to start with. If on the other hand you already love those albums, this is a safe purchase.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Casual listener beware: some Dark Magick Here 6 Feb. 2014
By jay taylor - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is one of those recordings that comes along, at most (if I'm lucky) maybe once or twice a year, that I totally fall for, that obsesses me, that I play every day for days so I can fully explore every nuance of what it does, that I make lists of other people who must hear it for. And I'm told that this is the "most accessible" of the Zorn / Moonchild discs. From the other one I have (Six Litanies for Heliogabalus) I must agree. However, this is still not for everyone. Not even most people. Patton's chainsaw banshee wailing and screaming can clear a room in a heartbeat, and even inspire anger in some. For me, it was the first of what is commonly referred to as the 'Moonchild Trio' discs (so-named after their first release titled "Moonchild: Songs without words", featuring the music of John Zorn as played by Mike Patton on vocals, Trevor Dunn on bass, and Joey Baron on drums, though with the addition of John Medeski on organ I argue they should now be called the 'Templars Quartet') and is one of my favorite works of the past couple years.

I have been a casual Zorn fan for many years, enjoying 'The Big Gundown' and 'Spillane', though rarely playing them, and a rabid Mike Patton fan for as many. The Mr. Bungle and Fantomas discs fascinated me each in their turn. But that was all a while ago, and like the typical shiny-obsessed music fans, I moved in-and-out-and-on to other things. Most Zorn / Patton recordings I had heard where just exercises in random noise making, lacking the focus and drive that truly excites me. As such I paid no attention to the Moonchild catalogue. Until this. And it was every thing I was looking for and more, without knowing it. I guess the timing was just right for me to hear it. Driving thru the dark windy pre-storm streets of Atlanta, playing it loud, I was transported to another world.

This music is thick with brooding, medieval atmospheres, as befits the subject matter (The Legend of the Knights Templars and their accusation by the Catholic Church of Baphomet / Devil Worship, which subsequently led to their persecution and near extinction, some say so that the Church could get the 'treasure' they had supposedly acquired) John Medeski's organ paints mysterious swaths of darkness in candle-lit monastic hallways over Baron and Dunn's jazzy rhythms while Patton whispers impressionistic poetry alternating between Latin and English, suddenly lurching into dissonant, King Crimson-ish blasts of metal, Patton shrieking and screaming and roaring. It is this characteristic see-sawing between delicate impressionistic medieval jazz and barbaric metal noise slabs that cause some to consider this 'more accessible' than the other ones (consistent structure as opposed to constant chaos) yet, as I discovered to my consternation, disturbs others to the breaking point. A couple of songs nearly sent my girlfriend into an anxiety attack. I thought she would appreciate the quiet sections, but nope, they just made her more nervous than ever, waiting for the screaming to come back around. Cant play it for her anymore!

This is the first Zorn disc I have ever fully loved. To my ears, his music has never before been so arranged, so focused in its effect. He has the best musicians here to help him. Joey Baron and Trevor Dunn can do anything they want with bass and drums, no limits there, and the addition of Medeski's organ adds an indescribable and unexpected beauty. For me, the music is never better than when Patton is reciting Zorn's graphic and evocative poetry (inspired by and dedicated to the works of Edgar Varese, Antonin Artaud, and Aleister Crowley, heavy stuff indeed) over the swirling vortex of sound this ensemble creates. Patton is the best, most interesting, most versatile vocalist around, and his wordless screaming and gibberish on "Heliogabalus' is a listening experience like no other, yet his effect is intensified even further by the rhythmic / phonetic demands of reciting actual words over this music, something I did not expect!

For the musically adventurous this is one of those great coaster rides that must be experienced all the way through. But the feint of heart beware: there is some dark, powerful magick at work in this music. Careful what you think about as you listen, for it may give you the power to manifest it, as befits, I suspect, Zorns' will and purpose.
Five Stars 2 Mar. 2015
By Jason Rook - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Very good
6 of 11 people found the following review helpful
THE CRAZY WORLD OF JOHN ZORN 18 Jun. 2012
By Manuel Grosso Galvan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
John Zorn had made in this year more that five albums. Only in the last months four, two incredible albums; "Gnostic Preludes" and "Mount Analogue". I know that he had different ways to see the world of music but in this case I can not understand the reason of this one. The mix of Gregorians chants, atonal melodies and cuasi-heavy metal is estrange and for me did not work at all. John Medesky at organ, Joey Baron and drums, Trevor Dunn an bass and and the infamous voice of John Patton try to make something bizarre about the mistic world of the Templars but and the end is not a good CD. Is far away from the world of Antonin Artaud, Edgar Varese or Aleister Crowley and near of the Crazy World of Arthur Brown. If you like something heavy or the concepts albums probably you love it, in other, case not. Anyway, Zorn is always interesant
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