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Teimo/Permafrost Double CD

5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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2 new from £63.96 4 used from £33.00

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Product details

  • Audio CD (7 Feb. 1997)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Double CD
  • Label: Mille Plateaux
  • ASIN: B00000B49G
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 600,007 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Ilira
  2. Andenes
  3. Teimo
  4. Nieve Penitentes 1
  5. Nieve Penitentes 2
  6. Nieve Penitentes 3
  7. Teimo. Schluss
  8. Ruska

Disc: 2

  1. Nival
  2. Serac
  3. Firn
  4. Permafrost
  5. Meta Incognita
  6. [Untitled Track]

Customer Reviews

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By G. Hardy VINE VOICE on 11 April 2002
Format: Audio CD
Let's get this straight first - this is not the sort of thing that will appeal to everyone. I've been told on numerous occasions : "What's that you're listening to. That's not music".
I guess it all comes down to what you define music as.
Koner obtains his effects from close-miked gongs, and adds some pretty heavy effects (relatively speaking) to them after that. The overall feel could best be described as being like a huge submarine scraping along the ocean floor. It is pure ambience, and it is minimal and bleak at times too.
I admit that this sort of music just does it for me. I have all his albums and can (possibly sadly) tell each album apart from a brief listen. There are differences there if you are prepared to *listen* to the music, and not just stick it on in the background.
It does take a little work to get something out of this, and the more you put in, the more you'll get out (cliche cliche - I know).
This is a superb double CD set, at a great price. Might just be worth the money to expand your horizons a little.
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Format: Audio CD
Koner's recordings are apparantly processed gong sounds. The effect is as if a momentary sound has been stretched, allowing the listener to enter the moment. Here everything is still, calm. There is no imagery, narrative or detail. Just a pure sound.
Teimo was Koner's first in this vein, Permafrost followed. It is possible to discern a progression from one to the other, some of the sounds are quite raw on Teimo, on the second they have become mostly unrecognisable. My favourite is the third album, Aubrite, where the sound has almost become music.
Koner also records mimimal techno as Porter Ricks.
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Format: Audio CD
absolutely incredible stuff, but be prepared for something very isolating and really rather inaccessible. On these albums Thomas Koner manages to artificially reproduce the sounds and of an arctic winter - wind, snow, cold, solitude. Really worth getting deep inside these recordings if you find most "ambient" too bright and jolly, or if you find the techno and dub leanings of his collaborative works too uptempo (unlikely, but possible)
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Format: Audio CD
arguably some of his best stuff. bought the originals on Barooni yonks ago but the sound quality's much better on this double pack. and cheaper too. bargain.
teimo's a bit of a mixed bag but has some fine examples of scary bass and also the very beautiful 'teimo' title track where koner's idea of melody is played out in his usual extremely subtle and slow form. really good.
permafrost seems much more of a proper concept album and again the title track is the one that really does it. if the rolling bass and subtle atmospherics dont evoke the image of an arctic wasteland then im not sure what will. maybe thats not something you want to be treated to anyway which is understandable. what amazes me about the permafrost track is the *really* subtle, almost musical note that comes in at around 7 1/2 minutes. its distance and faintness, plus the fact that it recedes to be repaced once more by all that bass, has an incredibly isolating effect. like youre there, in this blizzard, you perhaps hear a distant sound or voice but then its gone and youre completely alone again. gives you the shivers.
i once read an online quote where someone described thomas koner's music as 'emotionally devastating'. it sounds a bit sensational but i agree. if you 'get' it (and most people ive played it to DO, surprisingly) then there's little out there that can touch it for pure emotional impact.
anyone interested in his other stuff should stay away (not really) from his first album, nunatak gongamur cos its like a horror film. specially at night on headphones.
actually everything he's done solo is excellent so buy them all, the guy's obviously a genius :)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x8bb7fae0) out of 5 stars 3 reviews
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8bcb3e64) out of 5 stars An experience... 19 Oct. 2003
By Craig - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Words will quite simply not do justice to this brilliant collection of ambient soundscapes. Thomas Koner has produced what can only be considered as THE quintessential dark ambient album. There are many fine dark ambient producers making fantastic soundscapes at the moment. Some do it just as well as Koner, but none better.
This album is dark. However, not in the sense of Lustmord darkness. Listening to lustmord you get the feeling that some immense beast is lurking around the corner and will soon be doing nasty things to you. It's more hellish than Koner. Teimo/Permafrost provides a kind of immensity, a kind of enourmous solitude and thoughtful atmosphere. Some of it I think would make a good ambient soundtrack for lord of the rings in both Mordor and the Mines of Moria - odd noises barely audible, carried on the wind float past you and lead you to the inevitable question - what the hell made that noise?
I really is hard to capture the feeling of this album in words. It reminds me of the slow grind of plate tectonics, of the stately orbit of neutron stars. Massive submarines moving through the depths of the ocean and fading into the darkness. Of desolate and misty plains in the middle of lands long forgotten by man. The immense beauty of nature.
It really has to be experienced with a big, high quality hi-fi system to get the full effect. My system is pretty good, but I had the pleasure to hear it on a $15,000 system not long ago, and, well, wow...
Please do yourself a favour and buy it.
Note: Many people these days are classing any music that is not suitable for insane all night raves as ambient. Any music you can sit and listen to in your house! This album is REAL ambient. You won't hear a single beat or piece of percussion that hasn't been processed beyond recognition here. This is just a warning, as many people i've talked to have bought this album only to be dissappointed at just how ambient it is. Perhaps you should download before you buy, just to check its what you think it will be. But then BUY IT!
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8bcb3ec4) out of 5 stars Feel the ambience 8 May 2002
By G. Hardy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Let's get this straight first - this is not the sort of thing that will appeal to everyone. I've been told on numerous occasions : "What's that you're listening to. That's not music".
I guess it all comes down to what you define music as.
Koner obtains his effects from close-miked gongs, and adds some pretty heavy effects (relatively speaking) to them after that. The overall feel could best be described as being like a huge submarine scraping along the ocean floor. It is pure ambience, and it is minimal and bleak at times too.
I admit that this sort of music just does it for me. I have all his albums and can (possibly sadly) tell each album apart from a brief listen. There are differences there if you are prepared to *listen* to the music, and not just stick it on in the background.
It does take a little work to get something out of this, and the more you put in, the more you'll get out (cliche cliche - I know).
This is a superb double CD set, at a great price. Might just be worth the money to expand your horizons a little
15 of 19 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8bdb0450) out of 5 stars Dark Ambient 6 Dec. 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
As dark ambient musicians go, Köner is one of the best. The material here represents that genre in its purest form, with no concessions to such diluting influences as melody or rhythm. There's slowly drifting layers of dark synths, deep bass drones, all the usual stuff by the bucketload. Abyssal, sepulchral, subliminal, and so forth. Where Lustmord's older stuff had a dark, slightly demonic edge to it that suggested something nasty lurking just out of hearing, Köner's Teimo is cold, bleak, lifeless and inhospitable. Note that those aren't criticisms, that's just the way it sounds - Teimo calls up images of barren wildernesses scoured clean of life by howling winds. Not even lichen stands a chance in Köner's blasted wasteland. Well, almost - one track ("Nieve Penitentes 2") is rather more suggestive of bombers overhead than anything else. Permafrost, by contrast, takes the listener on a journey below the surface of this barren world. While it shares many of the same sonic ingredients, it's got more of an edge to it, and is a little noisier. We're not interested in lifeless wastelands and howling icy winds here, now we're floating through kilometres deep permafrost (well, I had to work the title in somehow), hearing the grinding of continental plates, listening to granite, the only sounds those of geology. Picture the lifeless landscape of Mars as seen by Pathfinder. Now imagine the same landscape - on a Bank Holiday. Sorry, I can't think of a particularly good US equivalent, since nothing ever seems to close down completely over here. Think of...umm, Nebraska, maybe? That's how utterly devoid of living things, how inhospitable Köner's soundscapes seem. All in all, good stuff, even if I can't adequately describe it. Fans of Lustmord-style dark ambient will lap it up. There's no direct comparisons to Lustmord's work - I can't say "this sounds a bit like Heresy" or anything like that. The only Lustmord that takes this bleak approach is The Place Where The Black Stars Hang, but there's not really a comparison there, Köner's work suggest a different kind of emptiness. It seems as good an introduction to dark ambient as any - Köner is, after all, one of the major names in the genre, and these two albums are almost definitively dark ambient.
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