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Teenage Fanclub

 

Top Albums by Teenage Fanclub (See all 43 albums)


See all 43 albums by Teenage Fanclub

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  Song Title Album
Time
 
Sparky's Dream (Album Version) Grand Prix
3:15
The Concept (Album Version) Upside Down: The Story Of Creation OST
6:07
Everything Flows Everything Flows (Single)
5:10
God Knows It's True Deep Fried Fanclub
4:53
Discolite (Album Version) Grand Prix
3:07
Neil Jung (Album Version) Grand Prix
4:48
The Concept (Album Version) Bandwagonesque
6:07
Mellow Doubt (Album Version) Grand Prix
2:42
When I Still Have Thee Shadows
3:29
Is This Music? (Album Version) Bandwagonesque
3:17

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At a Glance

Formed: 1989 (25 years ago)


Biography

"the pop landscape is littered with folks who wish they could deliver one or two tracks as good as the dozen found here" ~ PASTE MAGAZINE (of Shadows)

"Proof that youth is a state of mind you need never outgrow." ~ SPIN MAGAZINE

"Shadows is full of drowsy sweetness and mellow doubt: the sound of a great group ageing gracefully." ~ UNCUT (4 stars)

___________________________________________________________________________________________

NORMAN BLAKE is unwell.
“I’ve got a terrible hangover,” he says, not so much forcing the words out as trying to stop them from knocking him to the ... Read more

"the pop landscape is littered with folks who wish they could deliver one or two tracks as good as the dozen found here" ~ PASTE MAGAZINE (of Shadows)

"Proof that youth is a state of mind you need never outgrow." ~ SPIN MAGAZINE

"Shadows is full of drowsy sweetness and mellow doubt: the sound of a great group ageing gracefully." ~ UNCUT (4 stars)

___________________________________________________________________________________________

NORMAN BLAKE is unwell.
“I’ve got a terrible hangover,” he says, not so much forcing the words out as trying to stop them from knocking him to the ground. “I went out for a drink with a friend and we came back to my place and drank whisky last night. It’s a terrible thing.”
Norman has reason for celebration, as he and the rest of Teenage Fanclub have just finished their new album Shadows, which is both reflective and up-tempo, soulful and rocky, and excellent and good. Alcohol has not fogged him with gloom.
“I’m actually happier now. We started this record about a year and a half ago, and it’s been a long time coming,” he says. “I’m very happy with the way it sounds. We made the last album with John McEntire in Chicago and didn’t take any of our equipment other than guitars, whereas this time we took a whole load of stuff—synthesizers, the lot—and we went for it with this record. There are strings and lots and lots of harmonies, so it’s maybe back to what we did with our Grand Prix record, or something like that.”
The brilliance of Shadows, like all the best Teenage Fanclub records, is that it sounds like everything they’ve ever done and like nothing anyone else has ever done, all on one album.
“I suppose when you come to make a record, the way that we work, we can’t really go off on a tangent because it’s three people writing songs; it’s not one person’s vision,” says Norman. “It’s song-based, and all that we can do in terms of making it different is look at the way we arrange the songs. So we do try to make it different from album to album…
“Also, the way we work after all these years has become intuitive, and you just get a feel for when someone comes in with a song. Gerry’ll come in and play a song and outline how he wants it to work, but at that point, he’ll give us the freedom to express ourselves in that context.”

GERARD LOVE is out expressing himself in the freedom of a different context.
“I’m walking down by the River Clyde,” he says, before adding quickly, “it’s not a nature trail or anything, just in the city.”
Not that Gerry is averse to nature. He has fond memories of recording Shadows in rural climes.
“We recorded it in the country, in Norfolk,” he recalls. “Fruit trees outside the studio…you just reach up and pick fruit for your breakfast.” He hints at the length of the recording process, which for some can result in aural stodge, but on this occasion has provided Teenage Fanclub with one of their most thoughtful albums.
“We always have ideas and we always get to the studio without lyrics…and it’s usually the lyrics that take up all the time, really, and provide all the painful moments of being in the studio. We all had our ideas in place this time, but once again, the lyrics slowed it up.”
But surprisingly, the band’s variable geography did not. These days, Norman Blake lives in Ontario with his Canadian wife.
“I moved to Canada about six months ago, but here’s the thing: there is now cheap air travel and the internet,” he says, not entirely defensively. “I’ve actually been tinkering with the website. Other than time differences, it’s actually easy to stay in touch. I just have to get up a little earlier in the morning.”

RAYMOND McGINLEY has a ringing in his ears.
“I’ve been getting an alarm system fitted in my home, so it’s been all bells going off all day,” he says. He’s now sitting in merciful silence and able to ruminate about Shadows.
“I feel different things about it. It always seems strange in this interim period between recording and release. I’ve spent a lot more time doing tweaky stuff on this record than on the other records. We recorded it in a country studio in Norfolk, and then we went to Rockfield and mixed it. I’ve got a home studio now, and we came back and tweaked things here, and Norman did a vocal, so it seems the record is a bit more ‘think about it and go back to it.’”
Shadows may be a considered and well put-together record, but it has all the spontaneity of Bandwagonesque. It may have a deceptively simple feel, but it’s as polished and intelligent as Grand Prix. And despite the input of others and new ideas, it’s still a record that only the three members of Teenage Fanclub could make.
“The time we spend on a record has expanded over the years, but that’s natural. Twenty years ago, you’re in each other’s pockets…” says Raymond. “But everything works in a certain way, and this record’s spread out over a period of time.”
“Other people do other things and have a life,” adds Gerard, “and it’s allowed us to participate in other musical ventures.”
This is a policy that Norman Blake has been able to bring to bear on this record, adding Euros Childs to his rock attack armory.
“I’ve been working with him in our Jonny band, and he sings on ‘Baby Lee’—I thought his voice would work texturally, and I liked the idea for a couple of songs. His voice is quite high and as you get older, you lose the high notes, so we needed to bring in a younger man,” Norman says, manfully.
But it’s still the old firm who runs the show. So welcome to Shadows, a very, very good Teenage Fanclub album.
“Every record you do has some way it works out that isn’t by design,” concludes Raymond. “Things work out a certain way, and a band like us doesn’t do things by design; we don’t have to meet up and work out a strategy. The record is a strange amalgamation of what people are thinking and where they are. We do things intuitively.”
And it shows, and it works.

—David Quantick

Teenage Fanclub’s new album Shadows will be released on June 8, 2010, on Merge Records.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

"the pop landscape is littered with folks who wish they could deliver one or two tracks as good as the dozen found here" ~ PASTE MAGAZINE (of Shadows)

"Proof that youth is a state of mind you need never outgrow." ~ SPIN MAGAZINE

"Shadows is full of drowsy sweetness and mellow doubt: the sound of a great group ageing gracefully." ~ UNCUT (4 stars)

___________________________________________________________________________________________

NORMAN BLAKE is unwell.
“I’ve got a terrible hangover,” he says, not so much forcing the words out as trying to stop them from knocking him to the ground. “I went out for a drink with a friend and we came back to my place and drank whisky last night. It’s a terrible thing.”
Norman has reason for celebration, as he and the rest of Teenage Fanclub have just finished their new album Shadows, which is both reflective and up-tempo, soulful and rocky, and excellent and good. Alcohol has not fogged him with gloom.
“I’m actually happier now. We started this record about a year and a half ago, and it’s been a long time coming,” he says. “I’m very happy with the way it sounds. We made the last album with John McEntire in Chicago and didn’t take any of our equipment other than guitars, whereas this time we took a whole load of stuff—synthesizers, the lot—and we went for it with this record. There are strings and lots and lots of harmonies, so it’s maybe back to what we did with our Grand Prix record, or something like that.”
The brilliance of Shadows, like all the best Teenage Fanclub records, is that it sounds like everything they’ve ever done and like nothing anyone else has ever done, all on one album.
“I suppose when you come to make a record, the way that we work, we can’t really go off on a tangent because it’s three people writing songs; it’s not one person’s vision,” says Norman. “It’s song-based, and all that we can do in terms of making it different is look at the way we arrange the songs. So we do try to make it different from album to album…
“Also, the way we work after all these years has become intuitive, and you just get a feel for when someone comes in with a song. Gerry’ll come in and play a song and outline how he wants it to work, but at that point, he’ll give us the freedom to express ourselves in that context.”

GERARD LOVE is out expressing himself in the freedom of a different context.
“I’m walking down by the River Clyde,” he says, before adding quickly, “it’s not a nature trail or anything, just in the city.”
Not that Gerry is averse to nature. He has fond memories of recording Shadows in rural climes.
“We recorded it in the country, in Norfolk,” he recalls. “Fruit trees outside the studio…you just reach up and pick fruit for your breakfast.” He hints at the length of the recording process, which for some can result in aural stodge, but on this occasion has provided Teenage Fanclub with one of their most thoughtful albums.
“We always have ideas and we always get to the studio without lyrics…and it’s usually the lyrics that take up all the time, really, and provide all the painful moments of being in the studio. We all had our ideas in place this time, but once again, the lyrics slowed it up.”
But surprisingly, the band’s variable geography did not. These days, Norman Blake lives in Ontario with his Canadian wife.
“I moved to Canada about six months ago, but here’s the thing: there is now cheap air travel and the internet,” he says, not entirely defensively. “I’ve actually been tinkering with the website. Other than time differences, it’s actually easy to stay in touch. I just have to get up a little earlier in the morning.”

RAYMOND McGINLEY has a ringing in his ears.
“I’ve been getting an alarm system fitted in my home, so it’s been all bells going off all day,” he says. He’s now sitting in merciful silence and able to ruminate about Shadows.
“I feel different things about it. It always seems strange in this interim period between recording and release. I’ve spent a lot more time doing tweaky stuff on this record than on the other records. We recorded it in a country studio in Norfolk, and then we went to Rockfield and mixed it. I’ve got a home studio now, and we came back and tweaked things here, and Norman did a vocal, so it seems the record is a bit more ‘think about it and go back to it.’”
Shadows may be a considered and well put-together record, but it has all the spontaneity of Bandwagonesque. It may have a deceptively simple feel, but it’s as polished and intelligent as Grand Prix. And despite the input of others and new ideas, it’s still a record that only the three members of Teenage Fanclub could make.
“The time we spend on a record has expanded over the years, but that’s natural. Twenty years ago, you’re in each other’s pockets…” says Raymond. “But everything works in a certain way, and this record’s spread out over a period of time.”
“Other people do other things and have a life,” adds Gerard, “and it’s allowed us to participate in other musical ventures.”
This is a policy that Norman Blake has been able to bring to bear on this record, adding Euros Childs to his rock attack armory.
“I’ve been working with him in our Jonny band, and he sings on ‘Baby Lee’—I thought his voice would work texturally, and I liked the idea for a couple of songs. His voice is quite high and as you get older, you lose the high notes, so we needed to bring in a younger man,” Norman says, manfully.
But it’s still the old firm who runs the show. So welcome to Shadows, a very, very good Teenage Fanclub album.
“Every record you do has some way it works out that isn’t by design,” concludes Raymond. “Things work out a certain way, and a band like us doesn’t do things by design; we don’t have to meet up and work out a strategy. The record is a strange amalgamation of what people are thinking and where they are. We do things intuitively.”
And it shows, and it works.

—David Quantick

Teenage Fanclub’s new album Shadows will be released on June 8, 2010, on Merge Records.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

"the pop landscape is littered with folks who wish they could deliver one or two tracks as good as the dozen found here" ~ PASTE MAGAZINE (of Shadows)

"Proof that youth is a state of mind you need never outgrow." ~ SPIN MAGAZINE

"Shadows is full of drowsy sweetness and mellow doubt: the sound of a great group ageing gracefully." ~ UNCUT (4 stars)

___________________________________________________________________________________________

NORMAN BLAKE is unwell.
“I’ve got a terrible hangover,” he says, not so much forcing the words out as trying to stop them from knocking him to the ground. “I went out for a drink with a friend and we came back to my place and drank whisky last night. It’s a terrible thing.”
Norman has reason for celebration, as he and the rest of Teenage Fanclub have just finished their new album Shadows, which is both reflective and up-tempo, soulful and rocky, and excellent and good. Alcohol has not fogged him with gloom.
“I’m actually happier now. We started this record about a year and a half ago, and it’s been a long time coming,” he says. “I’m very happy with the way it sounds. We made the last album with John McEntire in Chicago and didn’t take any of our equipment other than guitars, whereas this time we took a whole load of stuff—synthesizers, the lot—and we went for it with this record. There are strings and lots and lots of harmonies, so it’s maybe back to what we did with our Grand Prix record, or something like that.”
The brilliance of Shadows, like all the best Teenage Fanclub records, is that it sounds like everything they’ve ever done and like nothing anyone else has ever done, all on one album.
“I suppose when you come to make a record, the way that we work, we can’t really go off on a tangent because it’s three people writing songs; it’s not one person’s vision,” says Norman. “It’s song-based, and all that we can do in terms of making it different is look at the way we arrange the songs. So we do try to make it different from album to album…
“Also, the way we work after all these years has become intuitive, and you just get a feel for when someone comes in with a song. Gerry’ll come in and play a song and outline how he wants it to work, but at that point, he’ll give us the freedom to express ourselves in that context.”

GERARD LOVE is out expressing himself in the freedom of a different context.
“I’m walking down by the River Clyde,” he says, before adding quickly, “it’s not a nature trail or anything, just in the city.”
Not that Gerry is averse to nature. He has fond memories of recording Shadows in rural climes.
“We recorded it in the country, in Norfolk,” he recalls. “Fruit trees outside the studio…you just reach up and pick fruit for your breakfast.” He hints at the length of the recording process, which for some can result in aural stodge, but on this occasion has provided Teenage Fanclub with one of their most thoughtful albums.
“We always have ideas and we always get to the studio without lyrics…and it’s usually the lyrics that take up all the time, really, and provide all the painful moments of being in the studio. We all had our ideas in place this time, but once again, the lyrics slowed it up.”
But surprisingly, the band’s variable geography did not. These days, Norman Blake lives in Ontario with his Canadian wife.
“I moved to Canada about six months ago, but here’s the thing: there is now cheap air travel and the internet,” he says, not entirely defensively. “I’ve actually been tinkering with the website. Other than time differences, it’s actually easy to stay in touch. I just have to get up a little earlier in the morning.”

RAYMOND McGINLEY has a ringing in his ears.
“I’ve been getting an alarm system fitted in my home, so it’s been all bells going off all day,” he says. He’s now sitting in merciful silence and able to ruminate about Shadows.
“I feel different things about it. It always seems strange in this interim period between recording and release. I’ve spent a lot more time doing tweaky stuff on this record than on the other records. We recorded it in a country studio in Norfolk, and then we went to Rockfield and mixed it. I’ve got a home studio now, and we came back and tweaked things here, and Norman did a vocal, so it seems the record is a bit more ‘think about it and go back to it.’”
Shadows may be a considered and well put-together record, but it has all the spontaneity of Bandwagonesque. It may have a deceptively simple feel, but it’s as polished and intelligent as Grand Prix. And despite the input of others and new ideas, it’s still a record that only the three members of Teenage Fanclub could make.
“The time we spend on a record has expanded over the years, but that’s natural. Twenty years ago, you’re in each other’s pockets…” says Raymond. “But everything works in a certain way, and this record’s spread out over a period of time.”
“Other people do other things and have a life,” adds Gerard, “and it’s allowed us to participate in other musical ventures.”
This is a policy that Norman Blake has been able to bring to bear on this record, adding Euros Childs to his rock attack armory.
“I’ve been working with him in our Jonny band, and he sings on ‘Baby Lee’—I thought his voice would work texturally, and I liked the idea for a couple of songs. His voice is quite high and as you get older, you lose the high notes, so we needed to bring in a younger man,” Norman says, manfully.
But it’s still the old firm who runs the show. So welcome to Shadows, a very, very good Teenage Fanclub album.
“Every record you do has some way it works out that isn’t by design,” concludes Raymond. “Things work out a certain way, and a band like us doesn’t do things by design; we don’t have to meet up and work out a strategy. The record is a strange amalgamation of what people are thinking and where they are. We do things intuitively.”
And it shows, and it works.

—David Quantick

Teenage Fanclub’s new album Shadows will be released on June 8, 2010, on Merge Records.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

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