Technopoly: The Surrender of Culture to Technology and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£8.76
  • RRP: £9.58
  • You Save: £0.82 (9%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Technopoly (Vintage) Paperback – 31 Mar 1993


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£8.76
£4.20 £0.01
Audio Cassette, Audiobook
"Please retry"

Trade In Promotion


Frequently Bought Together

Technopoly (Vintage) + The End of Education: Redefining the Value of School + The Disappearance of Childhood
Price For All Three: £27.14

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 10 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage Books; 1st Vintage Books Ed edition (31 Mar 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679745408
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679745402
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 1.6 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 426,268 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 12 Jun 1998
Format: Paperback
Postman has written two hand-wringing books about the impact of technology on culture--this one and his earlier Amusing Ourselves to Death. This book extends his thesis from just television to other media and includes some additional material, such as a chapter on Scientism (criticizing too much faith in science as the answer to every question) and a chapter on The Great Symbol Drain (about the cheapening of our sacred symbols, as for example, using a reference to God to sell Kosher hot dogs). There are a number of good points in the book, but if you will read Amusing Ourselves to Death for the "technology determines culture" argument and David Shenk's Data Smog for the current look at infoglut, you'll have a more interesting and perhaps more informative experience.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 8 Dec 1998
Format: Paperback
Clever and resourceful. It is fascinating the way Postman interweaves different aspect of life, such as printing press, IQ test, language, education, and polling system, into Technopoly. Postman's argument of American culture becoming too technologicaly oriented and loosing the traditions is a legitimate point. However, he ignors the fact that America does not have a tradition. America is trying to stablish a tradiotion. The tradition that America is "loosing" was not American tradition, it came with the pilgrims. As Postman is full of fascinationg information himself, he argues that we don't need any more information, "Technopolist stands firm in believing that what the world needs is yet more information...Information is dangerous when it has no place to go...Information without regulation can be lethal." But, he does not prescribe that, how much information is enough information? And how could we regulate information in a democratic society? The system is set-up for gathering infromation. Students are incouraged to collect infromation. One of the main points of Postman's argument is that the rise of technopoly demolished religious believes and therefore the traditions. Although the topics are repetitious, I found the book easy to read. Postman provokes many questions, such as, are we controlling technology or technology is controlling us? What is the purpose of history? Are we happy about where technology is taking us? Is it too late, or can technology be controlled? What about God?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 2 July 1998
Format: Paperback
I found this book to be one of the best I have read on the subject. Contrary to other reviewers here, I thought it was easy to read. Postman provides both a view on the changes that are occurring in society due to technology, as well as look at the dark side associated with our assumption that technology only works to solve the problem it was created for. Though he does get a little preachy near the end, I think that we would do well to heed his admonition that trusting technology too much leads to loss of liberty, privacy, and humanism.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 20 Mar 1999
Format: Paperback
Neil Postman, leaves no stone unturned in his attck on how technology's ideology is undermining our own values and our very way of life. This could be hardly considered an inspirational book, rather it a deep dark trip into how technology manipulates us,using us to become the supreme dictating system in society. This is a wonderfully informative book, supplying a fantastic amount of history from technology's humble beginnings in the form of the early printing press to the lightening fast computers of today. Even though the title "Technopoly" might suggest that this book might be filled with technical jargon, quite to the contrary, it is not concerned with such technical aspects, rather it is a book that would appeal to anyone, who is open-minded and wants to know the effect of rapidly growing technology on our soceity. Postman at first starts out with a more broad outlook at technology, but then devotes whole chapters to the different sciences that technology employs such as in medicine, physics etc so that it elevates its position to being considered in almost god-like porportions. It's interesting how Postamn points out to us has to how we have become so used to technolgy being integrated into our lifes that we don't notice how much we are prompting the aspects of accuracy and efficiency(which is one of the pillars that technology stands on), that we forget our own traditons and culture, out past is engulfed by technology's insatiable hunger. I could ramble on for quite a bit on this book, since there is so much stuff to comment on, to explain to understand. This book would be perfect as a stand alone read as well highly informative for high school or college students.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By M. Hamann on 18 Oct 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book started a bit slowly for me, but after the third or fourth chapter it became really engrossing. There are eleven chapters in all, the last of these contains a prescription for educational systems as well as individuals. The book reads more like a monologue than a traditional philosophy book. It is well-written but easily accessible to non-academics. The main thrust of the author's thesis is (as I understand it) technology is a moral question: just because something can be done does not imply we ought to do it. Furthermore, we have become indiscriminate in our acceptance of information, which complicates our lives. As I write this, more ideas come to me...I imagine I will re-read this book sometime. There is a lot of good information; this book is an important one for any and all.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback