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Sams Teach Yourself Android Application Development in 24 Hours (Sams Teach Yourself...in 24 Hours) [Paperback]

Lauren Darcey , Shane Conder
2.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
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Book Description

28 July 2011 0672335697 978-0672335693 2
Android is the world's #1 mobile development platform, and with the new Android 3.0, it's becoming as popular for tablets as it is for smartphones. If you are a beginner, in just 24 lessons of one hour or less, this friendly, full-color book will help you master modern Android development. You can build a fully-featured app from scratch, learning all the skills you'll need to create your own. Each lesson builds on prior chapters, providing a solid foundation for success. This edition is thoroughly updated for Android's newest features and development tools, while still supporting the popular Android 2.0. Coverage includes:
  • Using Eclipse to write apps quickly and efficiently
  • Understanding the application lifecycle
  • Building robust, friendly user interfaces
  • Retrieving, storing, and using data
  • Adding network, social, and location-based features
  • Supporting the camera and other hardware
  • Internationalizing, testing, and publishing apps
Revised and simplified step-by-step instructions with full-color screenshots walk you through key tasks... updated Q and As, Quizzes, and Exercises test your knowledge..."Did You Know?" tips offer insider advice..."Watch Out!" alerts help you avoid problems. By the time you're finished, you won't just understand core Android concepts: you'll be comfortable writing, testing, and publishing your own new apps.

 


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Sams Teach Yourself Android Application Development in 24 Hours (Sams Teach Yourself...in 24 Hours) + Sams Teach Yourself Java in 24 Hours (covering Java 7 and Android) (Sams Teach Yourself...in 24 Hours)
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Product details

  • Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Sams; 2 edition (28 July 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0672335697
  • ISBN-13: 978-0672335693
  • Product Dimensions: 2.7 x 17.8 x 23.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 401,918 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

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Product Description

From the Back Cover

In just 24 sessions of one hour or less, learn how to build powerful applications for the world’s first complete, open, and free mobile platform: Android. Using this book’s straightforward, step-by-step approach, you’ll build a fully-featured Android application from the ground up and master the skills you need to design, develop, test, and publish powerful applications. Each lesson builds on what you’ve already learned, giving you a rock-solid foundation for real-world success!

 

Some of the highlights of this new edition include:

  • More comprehensive code listings
  • New, improved exercises based upon reader feedback
  • Completely overhauled sample code on a new companion CD
  • New coverage of hot topics like tablet design, services, app widgets, Android Market updates, and more
  • Even more tips and tricks from the trenches to help you design, develop, and test applications for a different device targets, including an all-new chapter on tackling compatibility issues

 

Learn how to…

  • Develop Android applications quickly and successfully with Java
  • Master the latest Android SDK and development tools
  • Leverage the Eclipse programming environment to develop Android projects
  • Understand the Android application lifecycle
  • Build effective, user-friendly user interfaces
  • Store, retrieve, and manipulate application data
  • Add popular network, social, and  location-based features to your applications
  • Take advantage of Android device hardware like the camera
  • Internationalize, test, and publish your applications

 

Sample code available on CD can also be downloaded at informit.com/title/9780672335693

 

 

informit.com/sams

androidbook.blogspot.com

About the Author

Lauren Darcey is responsible for the technical leadership and direction of a small software company specializing in mobile technologies, including Android, iPhone, BlackBerry, Palm Pre, BREW, and J2ME, and consulting services. With more than two decades of experience in professional software production, Lauren is a recognized authority in enterprise architecture and the development of commercial-grade mobile applications. Lauren received a B.S. in Computer Science from the University of California, Santa Cruz.

She spends her copious free time traveling the world with her geeky mobile-minded husband. She is an avid nature photographer, and her work has been published in books and newspapers around the world. In South Africa, she dove with 4-meter-long great white sharks and got stuck between a herd of rampaging hippopotami and an irritated bull elephant. She’s been attacked by monkeys in Japan, gotten stuck in a ravine with two hungry lions in Kenya, gotten thirsty in Egypt, narrowly avoided a coup d’état in Thailand, geocached her way through the Swiss Alps, drank her way through the beer halls of Germany, slept in the crumbling castles of Europe, and gotten her tongue stuck to an iceberg in Iceland (while being watched by a herd of suspicious wild reindeer).

 

Shane Conder has extensive development experience and has focused his attention on mobile and embedded development for the past decade. He has designed and developed many commercial applications for Android, iPhone, BREW, BlackBerry, J2ME, Palm, and Windows Mobile—some of which have been installed on millions of phones worldwide. Shane has written extensively about the mobile industry and evaluated mobile development platforms on his tech blogs and is well known within the blogosphere. Shane received a B.S. in Computer Science from the University of California.

 

A self-admitted gadget freak, Shane always has the latest phone, laptop, or other mobile device. He can often be found fiddling with the latest technologies, such as cloud services and mobile platforms, and other exciting, state-of-the-art technologies that activate the creative part of his brain. He also enjoys traveling the world with his geeky wife, even if she did make him dive with 4-meter-long great white sharks and almost get eaten by a lion in Kenya. He admits that he has to take at least two phones and a tablet with him when backpacking, even though there is no coverage, that he snickered and whipped out his Android phone to take a picture when his wife got her tongue stuck to that iceberg in Iceland, and that he is catching on that he should be writing his own bio.

 

The authors have also published an intermediate/advanced book on Android development called Android Wireless Application Development, Second Edition, part of the Addison-Wesley Developer’s Library series. Lauren and Shane have also published numerous articles on mobile software development for magazines, technical journals, and online publishers of educational content. You can find dozens of samples of their work in Smart Developer magazine (Linux New Media), Developer.com, Network World, Envato (MobileTuts+ and CodeCanyon), and InformIT, among others. They also publish articles of interest to their readers at their own Android website, http://androidbook.blogspot.com. You can find a full list of the authors’ publications at http://goo.gl/f0Vlj.

 


Inside This Book (Learn More)
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
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Customer Reviews

2.3 out of 5 stars
2.3 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A poor introduction 20 Jan 2013
By app dev
Format:Paperback
Android Application Development in 24 Hours is only an introduction and a poor one at that. It does go into detail on how to set up the development environment, but most developers will have that done anyway before thinking about buying a dev book.

Please note, there is very little code in this book, and there is no effort to tie things together, eg the authors mention's the 'sensor' abilities, i.e. camera, compass, proximity, accelerometer etc, but does not use a full Activity example ? Sensor's are a major part of Mobil programming, they should get a chapter of their own.

The location/map section is shocking, not even an example of how to create and add overlays to a map, touch events etc just how to show a map ? Not a mention of KML which is the fundamental code behind the maps?

I have used 'Fragments' in a recent App, and they are great for modularising code and keeping things tidy, but there is half a page on the topic 'Fragments' ?

Why not create an App with code that has the following :

A Main Activity
A sub Activity with Fragments
A tab based frame
And do some examples in each activity ?

Just give the reader an overall picture / skeleton and create a foundation from the beginning of the book.

I don't get it, do what exactly in 24 hours?

This is not for a beginner or anybody really, you will not be able to build much after reading this, shocking from this publisher.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not very well written, hard to follow. 16 Nov 2011
Format:Paperback
I've used a few of these 24 hour books in the past without too much problem. This one became a bit of a nightmare the further I progressed in it.
The main reason for the problems, is that the step by step process frequently omits to mention significant steps required to make the project work.
Some of the omissions are fairly minor, and can be worked out with a debugger.
One larger issue was that the code example included a call to a function which didn't exist, and which there was no example to create it. Fortunately I was able to improvise my own and move on past this problem, but the code required was above the level at which the book appeared to be aimed.
Things became progressively worse, with chapters taking far longer than necessary, a lack of clarity about whether something was to be implemented, or was just an example, and indeed where it should be implemented. The whole thing came to a grinding halt on chapter 11 where the iteratively built project acquired an error which I am so far unable to debug.
One other point of issue was that the downloadable source files contain some differences in naming conventions, like they were written at a later stage, meaning they are not easily interchangable with the project you create.
On the whole, it takes a lot longer than the hour that each chapter suggests, mostly from the lack of clarity and consistency.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Easy to digest 15 Jan 2012
Format:Paperback
If you're looking to start out on Android, it might be worth considering an online crash-course or refresher course in Java before using this book.

Book itself is fine and does what it claims.

One word of warning. Setting up the Development Environment "By the book" can be troublesome (eg Directory layouts), but Google is your friend.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.6 out of 5 stars  48 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good, But Not For Beginners 26 Oct 2011
By Darth Mortis - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Sams Teach Yourself Android Application Development in 24 Hours is another one of the famous series of "24 Hours" books. While a good resource, I want to mention right off that bat that if you don't have any programming experience, you're going to be completely lost with this one. That doesn't mean you have to be the foremost expert, but you need to have some familiarity with how programming works because this book (no surprise by the title), moves a bit quickly.

If you do have programming experience, but you haven't done Android application development, this is a good introduction. It carries you "hour by hour" (each chapter is supposedly an hour) to bring you through to completion of a basic application. Depending on your level of skill, some chapters will be a breeze, others are going to take longer than an hour. At the end, you will probably not be the foremost authority on Android development, but you'll have a foundation to explore more.

From my own perspective, I did computer programming for several years, mainly in C and C++ (but I've had experience with Java, which you'll need here), later doing database programming. I never touched Android development until this book so I found it useful and, for the most part, I could grasp the concepts. If you find yourself in a similar situation, this book isn't a bad starting off point for you.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Pretty good if you know Java 21 Jun 2012
By Gen of North Coast Gardening - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
This book is generally well-illustrated and does a good job of laying out the step-by-step instructions needed to get started with small projects. It's not super beginner-friendly, but a dedicated person could pick up this book with little to no prior experience and get started programming. That said, if you don't know Java already, you'll need to be learning Java concurrently with this book in order to actually get anything done.

While I feel generally positive about this book, some of the organization was counter-intuitive to me. For example, there are a lot of programs needed in order to get started programming for Android. As the book is telling us instructions for getting started with these programs, they keep telling us to go to the back of the book where the instructions for installing programs are. I didn't like having to flip back and forth between sections, and it would have seemed more intuitive to just have the instructions for installing the programs in the same section where they're telling us to install them. There were a few other weird issues like this which weren't a big deal, but made me feel like they hadn't done a thoughtful job in their organization of the book.

Overall, this is a decent introduction to the topic. Could you do better? I'm not sure, as I haven't read the other books available. This one has enough good stuff in it that you wouldn't go too far wrong, but if you have a chance to compare multiple books in person, I'd do so as this one is not as beginner-friendly as it could be.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Beware beginners! 29 Feb 2012
By avaldez - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I got this book in the hopes of learning the syntax of android programming. My background is java, which the book suggests you know. The issue with this is, THE BOOK DOES NOT GIVE YOU ANY INFO ON THE LIBRARIES NEEDED TO IMPORT! If you do not know what that is, DO NOT buy this book! As I read through the book, it gave me a great background, but it threw information at me with no background info, which is needed in order for you to know what to do with it. The book babies you in what to do, but doesn't really say what to do with it after you have done it, maybe on some of the libraries. For this reason, I cannot justify telling anybody to buy this book. It essentially makes you go search for the background info yourself, and in that case, your better off just learning it from the android page on google... for FREE! That being said, I learned a little, but I cannot say I learned enough to make a fully functional app that actually does something productive.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Don't Expect a Miracle and you better know OOP! 21 Oct 2011
By Diana De Avila - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
You may be a Smart Phone user (be it Android or iPhone) and think you have a great idea for a mobile application that is going to make you filthy rich. Does that sound familiar at all? If it does, than a book with a title such as "Teach Yourself Android Application Development in 24 hours" is just the ticket, right? Wrong ... this would be a case of magical thinking. Who could blame you though ... the book states in it's title that you can teach development to yourself in 24 hours. A few things before you spend your hard earned money and your motivation on this book.

Although this book states that it's user level is for the Beginning to Intermediate level that means those beginners who are well-versed in some programming languages and at very least fundamentals of object oriented programming. Without that, the reader of this book is going to be lost in a hazy fog and probably feel out of their realm and discouraged. Suddenly that application that seemed like such a cool idea seems more out of reach than ever. If you are in that boat and need something built, hire a development team.

So, who is this book for:

- those who may have done some iPhone or other mobile development and want to try their hand at the Android Market. This is a beginning tome for you and just the ticket to see what's barely under the hood. This book will give you enough for the framework and help you get started. You will quickly move on to bigger and better things -- much of it available within the Google Developer community.

- this book could be a nice diversion for other types of developers who have an Android device and understand OOP and want to see what all the hooplah about mobile development is. The book is not going to make you an expert, but it will lead you in the right direction.

Who this book will NOT benefit:

- an entrepreneur who has an idea for a great mobile application but doesn't know Java, OOP or how to work with SDK's or JDK's.

- those who really do expect to teach themselves OOP through this book in a short amount of time.

I am unsure where the authors of this series come up with the "24 hours" gimmick in the title really refers to 24 lessons divided into 1 hour segments.

I gave the book 4 stars because it is a very well thought out and formatted Android Application development book. I enjoy the Sams books -- they offer good content structure and this one does not disappoint. I DID want to make it clear that beginners (not beginners in OOP) but beginners in general should probably steer clear lest they feel overwhelmed.

Having an idea for a great application is one thing, buying a book without the proper skills to back up your efforts because the title seems to make the book sound more accessible than it is ... well, that's just frustrating and I hope if you fall into that category, you'll search for something else. Don't let your application idea go by the wayside because you purchased a book that couldn't really teach you what you needed. Keep searching ...
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great if you are a bit familiar with Java 14 Mar 2012
By John Smith - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
This book is an excellent introduction to the Android development platform using Eclipse IDE. But if you're buying this book thinking that you can learn to write useful Android apps (not just a "Hello World" app) within a day without having any background in programming, preferably Java, you'll be hugely disappointed.

I was looking for prerequisites for this book but I don't see any. Though if you're truly determined to start coding for the Android platform, this book can get you up and running with all the tools you'll need to start your Android development in a very short time.
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