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Tchaikovsky: Manfred Symphony
 
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Tchaikovsky: Manfred Symphony

27 Nov. 2006 | Format: MP3

£7.46 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
16:23
30
2
9:12
30
3
10:28
30
4
19:29
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 27 Nov. 2006
  • Release Date: 27 Nov. 2006
  • Label: Decca Music Group Ltd.
  • Copyright: (C) 1988 Decca Music Group Limited
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 55:32
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001PJ666W
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 508,974 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By I. Giles HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 21 April 2013
Format: Audio CD
This disc, spectacularly recorded in 1987, enshrines a particularly powerful performance which rises to thrilling climaxes whenever the Manfred theme is heard. The quieter passages are played in a suitably lighter manner as appropriate.

Moments of particular note are the final minutes of the first movement where Manfred's despair cannot be missed. Among several other recordings that I have heard or owned of this work, this moment in this performance is without parallel. Much the same can be said about the equivalent passage towards the end of the last movement.

This symphony was written in the years between his Eugene Onegin and Pique Dame operas and it is striking how much of the elements of despair and self-doubt to be found in those two operas are also to be found in this symphony as expressed musically through melodic and textural means. The plots, of course, are about illicit or compromised love in all three instances and Tchaikovsky is known to have related that to his own compromised situation as he saw it. This symphony could therefore be seen as a somewhat autobiographical statement.

Chailly produces one of his finest and most exciting recorded performances with this disc and Decca have matched that with superb sound of great depth and dramatic bite.

Even with other fine recordings to consider, such as the recent Petrenko offering, I would suggest that this recording still holds its head up high and is well worth considering among the best for purchase. There is more light and shade in Petrenko's performances but Chailly is the more powerful. The solution - buy both!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
A Solid Manfred Symphony 13 Sept. 2009
By Transfigured Knight - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
The reviewer who called this music "boring" isn't listening hard enough. It's a beautifully intense piece of music that rewards the listener with each listening. Riccardo Chailly isn't really known for his Tchaikovsky interpretations, but this is a great reading with excellent playing from the Royal Concertgebouw and audio quality.

Unfortunately, like many recordings, this one is sadly out-of-print, but if you can find one used and in good shape for a good price, it would be worth it. "Manfred Symphony" is seldom recorded. I own many different versions: Jurowski, Pletnev, Petrenko, Jansons, and Rostropovich. I wish Bernstein had recorded this symphony as he would have really brought it alive, but this is a good performance by any standard and worth acquiring.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Powerful interpretation and playing with spectacular sound 21 April 2013
By I. Giles - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This disc, spectacularly recorded in 1987, enshrines a particularly powerful performance which rises to thrilling climaxes whenever the Manfred theme is heard. The quieter passages are played in a suitably lighter manner as appropriate.

Moments of particular note are the final minutes of the first movement where Manfred's despair cannot be missed. Among several other recordings that I have heard or owned of this work, this moment in this performance is without parallel. Much the same can be said about the equivalent passage towards the end of the last movement.

This symphony was written in the years between his Eugene Onegin and Pique Dame operas and it is striking how much of the elements of despair and self-doubt to be found in those two operas are also to be found in this symphony as expressed musically through melodic and textural means. The plots, of course, are about illicit or compromised love in all three instances and Tchaikovsky is known to have related that to his own compromised situation as he saw it. This symphony could therefore be seen as a somewhat autobiographical statement.

Chailly produces one of his finest and most exciting recorded performances with this disc and Decca have matched that with superb sound of great depth and dramatic bite.

Even with other fine recordings to consider, such as the recent Petrenko offering, I would suggest that this recording still holds its head up high and is well worth considering among the best for purchase. There is more light and shade in Petrenko's performances but Chailly is the more powerful. The solution - buy both!
Okay Manfred 12 May 2014
By PianoReview - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Concertgebouw - Decca? You would think this recording would be spectacular. Unfortunately, it is a very run of the mill performance and the sound quality is not the same that Decca got with Haitink and the Concertgebouw in Shostakovich. It was worth a try.
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
The Manfred Symphony - Tchaikovsky's Best & Least Appreciated Work 17 May 2011
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Pyotr Tchaikovsky has been my favorite composer all of my life. His "Manfred Symphony" is my personal favorite. It is hauntingly beautiful, mystical and extremely powerful (powerful being an understatement!). The "Manfred Symphony" is Tchaikovsky's only unnumbered symphony. It was written between his 4th and 5th symphonies. After Tchaikovsky wrote the "Manfred Symphony", it was thought by many to be his best symphony. Unfortunately, it is seldom played. My understanding is that it is a very long, difficult and complex piece. Also, the last movement features an organ. Most orchestras rather play easier and shorter pieces which require less practice and resources. That said, the Manfred really is an exciting piece. This recording by Chailly is my personal favorite. His interpretation is right on. Also, the sound is out of this world. Be sure to play it on a good stereo with the volume on high!
4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
One of Chailly's best romantic CDs, in spectacular sound 27 Sept. 2005
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
The Manfred Symphony is considered by man to be a major misfire by Tchiakovsky, a stepchild to his six symphonies that feels diffuse and banal -- Bernstein called it "trashy" and the great Evgeny Mravinsky never seems to have recorded it over his very long career. But Riccardo Chailly makes the work involving by paying precise attention to every detail of balance and phrasing. This would be too fussy in many other works, but it helps give Manfred moment-to-moment interest. The engineers have helped even more by giving Chailly spectcular sonics that make every bar sound gorgeous.

If you want an exciting Manfred, go for Toscanini's unsurpassed studio recording from 1949 (in surprisingly good sound) or the Naxos bargain version with Vasily Petrenko and the Royal Liverpool Phil., which of course lacks the world-class sheen and polish of the Concertgebouw. If you're doubtful about the work to begin with, this Decca CD is good enough to satisfy.
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