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Tamron AF 18-270mm f/3.5-6.3 Di II VC PZD LD Aspherical IF Macro Zoom Lens with Built in Motor for Nikon DSLR Cameras

by Tamron
| 19 answered questions

RRP: £663.83
Price: £319.00 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
You Save: £344.83 (52%)
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
16 new from £259.40 4 used from £230.00
For Nikon
  • Silent ultrasonic Piezo Drive motor
  • Vibration Compensation
  • Wide 18-270mm focal range
  • Ideal travel lens
  • 24% more compact and 100g lighter than its predecessor the 18-270mm VC (Model B003)

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£319.00 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Tamron AF 18-270mm f/3.5-6.3 Di II VC PZD LD Aspherical IF Macro Zoom Lens with Built in Motor for Nikon DSLR Cameras + Hoya 62mm Pro-1 Digital UV Screw in Filter + Hoya 62mm Pro-1 Digital Circular Polarizing Filter
Price For All Three: £364.09

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Product details

Style Name: For Nikon
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 7.4 x 8.8 cm ; 449 g
  • Boxed-product Weight: 680 g
  • Item model number: B008NII
  • ASIN: B004FLJVYQ
  • Date first available at Amazon.co.uk: 11 Dec 2010
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (110 customer reviews)

Awards

Style Name: For Nikon
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Product Description

Style Name: For Nikon

Product Description

The oustanding Tamron 18-270mm VC ultra zoom for APS-C format DSLRs has reached an astonishing new level of compactness, performance, and speed with the addition of PZD (Piezo Drive), an innovative ultrasonic autofocus motor based on an advanced piezoelectric design. The result is a lens that's light, and noticeably short and slim (filter diameter: 62mm), and provides fast, quiet auto-focusing. The following are the signature features that have made this amazingly versatile lens an ideal all-in-one solution for travelling photographers

Image
Piezo Silent Drive Mechanism

All New Piezo Silent Drive Mechanism (PZD)

The new PZD (Piezo Drive) piezoelectric drive marks another Tamron first in its autofocus SLR lenses, an internal standing wave ultrasonic motor system.

Innovations to reduce parts and simplify operation also contributed to the lens’s reduced size and weight. Light and small, the piezoelectric drive uses a standing wave, instead of a travelling wave, to turn and extend the piezoelectric element. Thus the entire element moves in a standing wave pattern, moving the metal tip (the contact surface) in an elliptic motion. The friction of this movement moves the rotor for a smooth, precise autofocus.

Ultrasonic motors are divided into two categories depending on the principle that generates the energy to move the drive: traveling wave motors and standing wave motors. Traveling wave motors include the ring type ultrasonic motor used in the recently launched 70-300mm F/4-5.6 VC USD as well as other lenses, but this lens with its newer technology, the PZD (Piezo Drive), functions on the standing wave principle. A standing wave ultrasonic motor utilizes high-frequency voltage to extend and turn the piezoelectric (piezoceramic) element, thus moving the entire element in a standing wave movement. The metal tip is the contact point of the element to the rotor, and moves in an elliptic motion from the swiveling motion of the moving element, and the friction from this motion turns the rotor. Standing wave ultrasonic motors have the distinct advantage of being smaller than their traveling wave counterparts, and therefore allow a more compact SLR lens size.

Image
15x Zoom

Powerful 15x Zoom

This lens covers an extremely broad range of focal lengths, from an extra-wide 18mm length to a telephoto 270mm length (the 35mm equivalent of 28mm to 419mm). The resulting 15x zoom ratio is the world's largest, representing a wide cross section of Tamron high-power zoom design technologies. Additionally, the vibration compensation works throughout the entire zoom range, giving you the freedom to create a wide variety of images. The lens lets users capture once in a lifetime panoramic landscape images or close-up pictures of children smiling, all without getting too close to the subject or changing lenses. Other details include a macro magnification range of 1:3.5, a minimum focusing distance of 19.3 inches, and a 72mm filter diameter.

Di II

Tamron Di-II lenses are engineered expressly for digital SLR cameras with image sensors commonly referred to as APS-C, measuring approximately 24mm x 16mm. Rendering an ideal image circle for APS-C sensors, Di-II lenses are also include properties to optimize digital imaging performance. These lenses are not designed for conventional cameras or digital cameras with image sensors larger than 24mm x 16mm.

Image
Low Dispersion Glass

Low Dispersion Glass (LD)

Low dispersion (LD) glass elements in a lens help reduce chromatic aberration, i.e. the tendency of light of different colours to come to different points of focus at the image plane. Chromatic aberration reduces the sharpness of an image, but glass with an extremely low dispersion index has less of a tendency to separate (defract) a ray of light into a rainbow of colours. This characteristic allows the lens designer to effectively compensate for chromatic aberration at the center of the field (on axis), a particular problem at long focal lengths (the telephoto end of the zoom range), and for lateral chromatic aberration (towards the edges of the field) that often occurs at short focal lengths (the wide-angle end of the zoom range.)

Internal Focusing System (IF)

Internal focusing provides numerous practical benefits to photographers, including a non-rotating front filter ring that facilitates the positioning of polarizing and graduated filters, and more predictable handling as the lens length does not change during focusing. Crucially, Tamron’s Internal Focusing (IF) system provides a much closer minimum focusing distance (MFD) throughout its entire focusing range. IF also improves optical performance by minimising illumination loss at the corners of the image field, and helps to suppress other aberrations that become more troublesome at different focusing positions.

Zoom Lock (ZL)

Tamron's Zoom Lock (ZL) function is a simple convenience feature that prevents undesired extension of the lens barrel when carrying the camera/lens on a neck strap.

Vibration Compensation

Vibration Compensation (VC)

Tamron’s VC (Vibration Compensation) just got even better.

It still offers great handheld and telephoto shots. It still delivers the excellent VC (Vibration Compensation) stable viewfinder image, and excellent traceability. It’s still based on a moving three-coil mechanism that activates the lens group electromagnetically through three steel balls. But technology must evolve. Previously, the heavy magnet was positioned near the lens element and worked very well in this placement. In the new VC (Vibration Compensation) mechanism, we’ve reversed the positioning of the magnet and connected the lens to the coils. This innovative new position thus achieves less load on the drive and combined with lighter coils, contributes to a lighter, more efficient lens. Shake can ruin your photos, particularly when taking telephoto shots or shooting in low light conditions. Simply flip the VC switch on and you'll notice the difference immediately.

VC delivers blur free - handheld images for incredible results VC mechanism employs a three-coil system Lens element compensates for vibration using 3-steel balls (making movement quiet & smooth) Exceptional images at slower shutter speeds – reduces the need for a tripod Bring out contrast to motion & stillness Eliminate the need to shoot with a Flash        

Anomalous Dispersion (AD)

Anomalous dispersion glass is a special type of optical glass that is used to achieve more precise control of chromatic aberrations, thereby enhancing overall imaging performance. Glass of this type provides an abnormally large partial dispersion ratio (amount of diffraction) for light of specific wavelength ranges (colours) within the visible spectrum. By combining AD glass having these special characteristics with elements made of normal glass having different dispersion characteristics, it is possible to control the dispersion factors of a specific wavelength. This enhanced level of control results in much lower levels of on-axis (central) chromatic aberration for telephoto lenses (or zooms used at tele-photo settings) and a significant reduction of lateral (peripheral) chromatic aberration for wide-angle lenses (or zooms used at wide-angle settings.)

Image
Zoomed In

Aspherical Lens Elements (ASL)

Tamron uses several hybrid Aspherical lens elements in many lenses bearing the Aspherical designation. These innovative optics allow us to achieve exceptional image quality, and at the same time produce lenses that offer remarkable zoom ranges in extraordinarily compact packages. By perfecting these cutting-edge advances for series production, Tamron virtually eliminated spherical aberration and image distortion from the high-power-zoom series. Through the effective application of Hybrid Aspherical Technology, one lens element can take the place of multiple elements without compromising performance. This is what allows us to produce remarkably compact long-range lenses that deliver a uniformly high level of image quality at all focal lengths and apertures.

Box Contents

  • Tamron
  • 18-270mm VC PZD Lens
  • Lens hood
  • Dust cap
  • Lens cap

Manufacturer's Description

The oustanding Tamron 18-270mm VC ultra zoom for APS-C format DSLRs has reached an astonishing new level of compactness, performance, and speed with the addition of PZD (Piezo Drive), an innovative ultrasonic autofocus motor based on an advanced piezoelectric design. The result is a lens that's light, and noticeably short and slim (filter diameter: 62mm), and provides fast, quiet auto-focusing. The following are the signature features that have made this amazingly versatile lens an ideal all-in-one solution for travelling photographers

Image
Piezo Silent Drive Mechanism

All New Piezo Silent Drive Mechanism (PZD)

The new PZD (Piezo Drive) piezoelectric drive marks another Tamron first in its autofocus SLR lenses, an internal standing wave ultrasonic motor system.

Innovations to reduce parts and simplify operation also contributed to the lens’s reduced size and weight. Light and small, the piezoelectric drive uses a standing wave, instead of a travelling wave, to turn and extend the piezoelectric element. Thus the entire element moves in a standing wave pattern, moving the metal tip (the contact surface) in an elliptic motion. The friction of this movement moves the rotor for a smooth, precise autofocus.

Ultrasonic motors are divided into two categories depending on the principle that generates the energy to move the drive: traveling wave motors and standing wave motors. Traveling wave motors include the ring type ultrasonic motor used in the recently launched 70-300mm F/4-5.6 VC USD as well as other lenses, but this lens with its newer technology, the PZD (Piezo Drive), functions on the standing wave principle. A standing wave ultrasonic motor utilizes high-frequency voltage to extend and turn the piezoelectric (piezoceramic) element, thus moving the entire element in a standing wave movement. The metal tip is the contact point of the element to the rotor, and moves in an elliptic motion from the swiveling motion of the moving element, and the friction from this motion turns the rotor. Standing wave ultrasonic motors have the distinct advantage of being smaller than their traveling wave counterparts, and therefore allow a more compact SLR lens size.

Image
15x Zoom

Powerful 15x Zoom

This lens covers an extremely broad range of focal lengths, from an extra-wide 18mm length to a telephoto 270mm length (the 35mm equivalent of 28mm to 419mm). The resulting 15x zoom ratio is the world's largest, representing a wide cross section of Tamron high-power zoom design technologies. Additionally, the vibration compensation works throughout the entire zoom range, giving you the freedom to create a wide variety of images. The lens lets users capture once in a lifetime panoramic landscape images or close-up pictures of children smiling, all without getting too close to the subject or changing lenses. Other details include a macro magnification range of 1:3.5, a minimum focusing distance of 19.3 inches, and a 72mm filter diameter.

Di II

Tamron Di-II lenses are engineered expressly for digital SLR cameras with image sensors commonly referred to as APS-C, measuring approximately 24mm x 16mm. Rendering an ideal image circle for APS-C sensors, Di-II lenses are also include properties to optimize digital imaging performance. These lenses are not designed for conventional cameras or digital cameras with image sensors larger than 24mm x 16mm.

Image
Low Dispersion Glass

Low Dispersion Glass (LD)

Low dispersion (LD) glass elements in a lens help reduce chromatic aberration, i.e. the tendency of light of different colours to come to different points of focus at the image plane. Chromatic aberration reduces the sharpness of an image, but glass with an extremely low dispersion index has less of a tendency to separate (defract) a ray of light into a rainbow of colours. This characteristic allows the lens designer to effectively compensate for chromatic aberration at the center of the field (on axis), a particular problem at long focal lengths (the telephoto end of the zoom range), and for lateral chromatic aberration (towards the edges of the field) that often occurs at short focal lengths (the wide-angle end of the zoom range.)

Internal Focusing System (IF)

Internal focusing provides numerous practical benefits to photographers, including a non-rotating front filter ring that facilitates the positioning of polarizing and graduated filters, and more predictable handling as the lens length does not change during focusing. Crucially, Tamron’s Internal Focusing (IF) system provides a much closer minimum focusing distance (MFD) throughout its entire focusing range. IF also improves optical performance by minimising illumination loss at the corners of the image field, and helps to suppress other aberrations that become more troublesome at different focusing positions.

Zoom Lock (ZL)

Tamron's Zoom Lock (ZL) function is a simple convenience feature that prevents undesired extension of the lens barrel when carrying the camera/lens on a neck strap.

Vibration Compensation

Vibration Compensation (VC)

Tamron’s VC (Vibration Compensation) just got even better.

It still offers great handheld and telephoto shots. It still delivers the excellent VC (Vibration Compensation) stable viewfinder image, and excellent traceability. It’s still based on a moving three-coil mechanism that activates the lens group electromagnetically through three steel balls. But technology must evolve. Previously, the heavy magnet was positioned near the lens element and worked very well in this placement. In the new VC (Vibration Compensation) mechanism, we’ve reversed the positioning of the magnet and connected the lens to the coils. This innovative new position thus achieves less load on the drive and combined with lighter coils, contributes to a lighter, more efficient lens. Shake can ruin your photos, particularly when taking telephoto shots or shooting in low light conditions. Simply flip the VC switch on and you'll notice the difference immediately.

VC delivers blur free - handheld images for incredible results VC mechanism employs a three-coil system Lens element compensates for vibration using 3-steel balls (making movement quiet & smooth) Exceptional images at slower shutter speeds – reduces the need for a tripod Bring out contrast to motion & stillness Eliminate the need to shoot with a Flash        

Anomalous Dispersion (AD)

Anomalous dispersion glass is a special type of optical glass that is used to achieve more precise control of chromatic aberrations, thereby enhancing overall imaging performance. Glass of this type provides an abnormally large partial dispersion ratio (amount of diffraction) for light of specific wavelength ranges (colours) within the visible spectrum. By combining AD glass having these special characteristics with elements made of normal glass having different dispersion characteristics, it is possible to control the dispersion factors of a specific wavelength. This enhanced level of control results in much lower levels of on-axis (central) chromatic aberration for telephoto lenses (or zooms used at tele-photo settings) and a significant reduction of lateral (peripheral) chromatic aberration for wide-angle lenses (or zooms used at wide-angle settings.)

Image
Zoomed In

Aspherical Lens Elements (ASL)

Tamron uses several hybrid Aspherical lens elements in many lenses bearing the Aspherical designation. These innovative optics allow us to achieve exceptional image quality, and at the same time produce lenses that offer remarkable zoom ranges in extraordinarily compact packages. By perfecting these cutting-edge advances for series production, Tamron virtually eliminated spherical aberration and image distortion from the high-power-zoom series. Through the effective application of Hybrid Aspherical Technology, one lens element can take the place of multiple elements without compromising performance. This is what allows us to produce remarkably compact long-range lenses that deliver a uniformly high level of image quality at all focal lengths and apertures.

Box Contents

  • Tamron
  • 18-270mm VC PZD Lens
  • Lens hood
  • Dust cap
  • Lens cap


Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

476 of 485 people found the following review helpful By Naftade on 14 Feb 2011
Style Name: For Canon
....Versatility never comes without cost:

GENERAL
+ First impression when mounted to my t2i was "wow". I could hardly believe how small this thing really is considering it's zoom range! It's also very light (only a tiny little bit heavier than a Tamron 17-50 2.8!)
You can carry it around easily and my t2i felt very well balanced with it. - A good start
+ the lens comes with a lens hood (you see Canon!?) and with a 5 years warranty. That's quite a package, even though the lens hood (being suitable for all offered focal lengths) cannot really help when you are zoomed in to the max.

BUILT QUALITY
+- the lens is manufactured in China. Quality appearance is ok, but nothing to rave about

IMAGE QUALITY
Resolution
+- considering it's enormous range, I was surprised how sharp this lens can get. Resolution is not the reason why I finally opted against the product. It never really gets razor sharp, but at least at most focal lengths it will get the job done. As long as you don't plan to print really big, contemplate your pictures at 100% view on a monitor, or plan to crop details, things will look quite all right (i will upload a few samples, to show you). There are only a few focal lengths at which it delivers really poor resolution unless stopped down at least two f-stops. Unfortunately two rather important settings are among these problematic ones. At the end of the zoom range (250-270 mm f 6.3) and at it's beginning (18 mm f 3.5) pictures can look plainly soft. Especially at the long end, this can be very disturbing as you need a whole lot of light anyway when shooting at 270mm. At f8 things look better, but you won't blur your background that easily and of course you will need quite bright light to get these shots free of shake.
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251 of 256 people found the following review helpful By Shaun Horrigan TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 17 April 2011
Style Name: For Canon
Photography has changed since I last owned an SLR some 20 years ago. At that time, for most of us, prints would be viewed at 6x4 or 7x5, or perhaps for that special one or two pictures enlarged to 10x8. Now we look at our photos on a large computer monitor or an HDTV at a much higher resolution than our old pictures would ever be viewed at and we expect them to still look good.

After much research I once again found that lenses are still all about compromise. The compromise of price against performance, of performance versus ease of use, of zoom versus prime, and many other compromises. As with most amateur photographers I don't have infinite funds and although without doubt a collection of Canon L series lenses would give the best image quality possible, I had to look at more realistic options.

I also wanted a lens with a large focal range so that I would not have to carry other lenses with me and I was initially going to buy the older version of this lens. After trying the two side by side though, the PZD version wins hands down. It is smaller, lighter, quieter, and much faster to focus than its older brother. I know the weight difference doesn't sound like much on paper, but the two lenses feel totally different on the camera. The older version feels heavy and bulky compared to the newer one. Also compared to the older version of the lens, the PZD motor is almost silent the focus locks on very quickly, as does the image stabilisation.

As for image quality - once again there are compromises. There is some vignetting at longer focal lengths and perhaps the images are a fraction soft around the edges, but these really are a small price to pay for the convenience of a lens that covers such a massive focal range.
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51 of 53 people found the following review helpful By PETER DAVID OWEN on 14 Feb 2012
Style Name: For Canon
I've only had this Tamron AF 18-270mm f/3.5-6.3 Di II VC PZD a couple of weeks now and have taken a couple of hundred images using it fitted to my Canon 600D / T3i. I purchased this lens in the UK for £425 and can immediately state that I'm very pleased with it.

Image quality wise I'd say that it's on par with the Canon kit lenses (EF-S 18-55 & 55-250), so don't expect this Tamron lens to provide you with ultra sharp images on your HDTV or monitor! As well as appearing a bit soft images also seem slightly flat on colour & contrast (though the time of year is a major factor here I suspect!), and certainly you'll need relatively good lighting conditions to get the best out of the very fast & accurate PZD auto-focusing system. The PDZ auto-focusing works well in "Quick" and "Live View" modes on the Canon 600D body.

Notwithstanding, the VC stability system certainly helps to keep "shake" to a minimum and really does make this lens easy to use at near maximum telephoto extensions when hand held. One point worth noting is that the view in the viewfinder jumps slightly to one side when the camera button is half pressed (VC & Autofocus engaged) - I've read somewhere that this is normal for this lens and does not affect the image recorded which naturally is what you see just before the shutter button is fully depressed.

Yes, the lens barrel will readily extend (creep) as soon as it's pointing down, but the 18mm position lock switch is readily accessible and easy to apply when the camera is not in use.

Given it's huge zoom range, compact size and it's fast accurate auto-focusing coupled with an excellent lens stabilizing facility then I'd certainly rate this lens as a MUST HAVE for everyday general use as it saves the hassle of trying to carry an array of other lenses - a definite 5 star!
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