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Talk Talk Paperback – 7 May 2007

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Product details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC; New edition edition (7 May 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0747586195
  • ISBN-13: 978-0747586197
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.7 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 686,487 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

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Product Description

Review

`A thriller, road chase and exquisitely modulated examination of
identity' -- Financial Times Magazine

`Boyle is masterful at putting you right there with Dana, feeling
the full force of each injustice' -- Independent

`Boyle is unashamedly an entertainer ... the shambolic criminal
justice system is as well realised as it is in Tom Wolfe's Bonfire of the
Vanities' -- Time Out

`Entertaining, headlong, and told with the sharp, droll and
inventive prose one would expect from an author of this calibre' -- Economist

`The writing has real literary polish and the best set-pieces are
superb, illuminating whole social worlds ... hugely entertaining' -- David Robson, Sunday Telegraph

About the Author

T.C. Boyle's novels include World's End, winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction, The Tortilla Curtain, Riven Rock, A Friend of The Earth, Drop City (which was a finalist for the National Book Awards) and The Inner Circle. His stories appear regularly in most major magazines, including the New Yorker, Esquire, Playboy, Granta and the Paris Review. He lives in California.

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First Sentence
SHE WAS RUNNING LATE, always running late, a failing of hers, she knew it, but then she couldn't find her purse and once she did manage to locate it (underneath her blue corduroy jacket on the coat tree in the front hall), she couldn't find her keys. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A. Reynolds on 13 Aug. 2009
Format: Paperback
Just as Kinglsey Amis complained of the 'compulsive vividness' of his son's literary style, so I must place TC Boyle in that same starstruck category. Yes, Boyle is as consummate in his use of the language as such modern greats as Anthony Burgess and Martin Amis, but it is no substitute for the classic structure of the good story that has a beginning, middle and end with plausible situations involving believable characters that we can sympathise with.

And this is where "Talk Talk" falls down. It is one of TC's duds. The plot is weak, the situations implausible and the ending just made me want to hurl the book across the room as it suffers the same structural weakness as some of Boyle's other works that have also marred my enjoyment with a weak denouement.

That said, Boyle is one of those writers who can be read for the sheer, inventive playfulness of the language. For that, he has three stars and my forgiveness.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By larry deluxe on 25 July 2006
Format: Paperback
TC Boyle is a great writer, but this newest is a little too thin. Identity theft is a hot topic, and he will probably score big points with movie options and current event freaks, but these lame brain characters go way overboard in their reaction and you spend a lot of time yelling advice and "why dont you just call the cops!" out loud at them. Talk Talk was a great idea, but at the end you feel youve wasted your time.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By T. W. Mcclurg on 18 Aug. 2006
Format: Paperback
This is a gripping tale and ideal holiday reading . T C Boyle is an expert storyteller and the narrative never flags . The characters are well drawn and maintain our sympathy throughout. The author conveys the world of his deaf heroine Dana in all its frustrations and silent striving and gives the reader a vivid picture of how reality must appear to the deaf. He also gives an intelligent vision of American lifestyles and the way we are all besottted ( and enslaved ) by technology .I recommend this book to anyone who admires skilful, taut and unpretentious prose.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Scribbler on 20 Nov. 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
T C Boyle has written some cracking books, but this isn't one of them. The plot is just silly - as others have said, too many coincidences, a very poor ending and the never-answered question of why they don't call the cops - and the characters appear to have come from a stock library of goodies and baddies. Boyle shows off his command of the language but to no material effect. The descriptions of what is being cooked are as boring as it gets. I felt cheated, because I stuck with all of this rubbish in the hope of a strong ending, or at least an upturn in the quality of the story. No such luck.
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Format: Kindle Edition
This book started so, so well. I was immediately drawn in by Dana, a young deaf woman facing a hideous case of mistaken identity. I clicked instantly with her boyfriend too, Bridger. In my head I cast him as Jesse Pinkman, Breaking Bad's loveable every-dude. This pair are smart, attractive, interesting, and suddenly thrown together into a cross country road trip/ nightmare set up that I found irresistible.

But like Dana's deaf-girl driving, it drifted. The action came in fits and starts, with both parties apparently losing interest then getting angry again without much apparent motivation. I'm willing to overlook the elephant in the room - their failure to call the police on countless occasions - because this is a thriller. But the pace just faltered too many times.

I read this book quickly, and yes, I couldn't put it down. I was drawn in again and again, only to find loss of steam and tailing off every time things moved forward.

The book has inevitably dated quickly in the fast rush of digital technology. The protagonists all flip their phones shut, and at one point we're expected to be impressed that Bridger has downloaded and printed off a map from The Internet. Maps? We don't use them now.

The writing is verbose, as you would expect from TCB. At times it's almost laughably over written, but who am I to question this mans skill with words. I actually enjoyed the food theme, the fast food on the road as much as the gourmet stuff served up by the violent ex con. Oh I know, just go with it.

The ending is just so rubbish I can hardly credit it. I'm sure most reviewers here feel they could do better themselves, I feel certain that I could. I would just love to hone and fine tune this book, because I loved the characters, the settings, the whole idea of it so much and I think it lost a lot in the execution.

But I learned a lot, and I enjoyed the ride.
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Format: Paperback
The hardest thing about being an unconsecrated novelist for the highway scribe, is being an unconsecrated novelist.

Or at least it used to be. There is nothing more boring after 20 years of scribbling to sit around and stew in one's own bitter brew of what writer Steve Almond calls "fame angst."

In the end, all the clichés apply. As an artist, you're not racing anybody, rather engaged in a most particular and personal journey of learning that has nothing to do with other creatives.

The point being that the scribe is at a good place where he knows being the BEST BIGGEST WRITER IN THE WORLD, COUNTRY, STATE (or just on the block), is an illusory goal, that such things are hard to quantify, least of all through immediate commercial success.

And so it's nice to sit and read a novel by someone like T.C. Boyle, with fame and many, many more novels and achievements to his credit than the scribe, and simply be able to enjoy it for the good writing it is, as opposed to the good writing it is next to the scribe's equally good writing etc.

the scribe's sister Rosemany (Ro) sent Boyle's latest, "Talk Talk" as a gift for Christmas.

Ro turned the scribe onto Boyle with a book of short stories she loaned him a few years ago. the scribe took it to a Boyle reading and had the author sign it to the sister, which he sent back to her. It (the book) soon found its way to another Boyle reading on the very same tour, but in Boston.

One of us (probably her) must have made an impression because a minor character in "Talk Talk" is a pizza chef named, Skip Siciliano.

Anyway, who the hell cares about that. "Talk Talk," is a wonderful novel and a great read. Go out and get it and rip through it the way the scribe did.
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